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Which BEV model will be the first to reach 100,000+ deliveries in 1 calender year? And in what year will that be realised?

Which BEV model will be the first to reach 100,000+ deliveries in 1 calender year? And in what year will that be realised?

The second half of the current decade is underway and we can expect a few things to happen in the next few years.

Generally the awareness and acceptance of BEV models is continuingly growing in many countries, year after year.

Affordability (less than $40,000) and range (200+ miles) are two key factors for the success of BEV models in the near future.

So far, we have learned that at least three BEV models will come to market in 2017: Tesla Model 3, Chevrolet Bolt, Second Generation Nissan Leaf. Other Car Manufacturers could also introduce BEV models that will compete with these three.

But how do we think that this all will work out in the next few years?

Which BEV model will be the first to reach 100,000+ deliveries in 1 calender year?
And in what year will that be realised?

MountainVoyageur | 01. November 2015

I'm afraid I do not understand the entire 200+ mile BEV story. It makes no sense to me (other than Tesla). 200+ miles is more than is needed for a town car, and I have not yet seen anything about a road-trip charging strategy. Perhaps they will take up Elon's offer to cooperate with Tesla on the Supercharger network, but I have seen no hints that is in the works.

--MV

deeageux | 02. November 2015

It is not about need but want and comfort level.

Zero chance I would buy a sub 150 mile car.

I have read on this forum wives of P85D owners freaking out because range was less than S85.

Over on the GM-Volt forums that are several Volt owners that say they need a dcfc on every corner or 1000 mile range to feel comfortable giving up their ICE er range extender.

A majority of Americans seem unwilling to consider a BEV until they can afford one with a real world 300 mile range even if they have not drive over 150 miles in one day in the last five years.

Back on topic

Bolt EV will have enough batteries coming from Korea for 30k Volts per year. They have also told other suppliers to prepare for 25k-30k Bolt EVs.

Nissan has the capacity to assemble enough cells for 200k LEAFs in Tennessee, the UK and Japan for a grand total 600k. It seems Nissan will be buying cell components from LG Chem then assemble the cells themselves. How much they are buying is unknown. I don't think even Nissan knows how much material they want.

My wager is LEAF is the first model to get to 100k in 2018.

Tesla will get to 100k in 2017 with S and X.

And my second wager is the Model 3 is the first model to 200k in 2019.

Benz | 02. November 2015

@ deeageux

"Nissan has the capacity to assemble enough cells for 200k LEAFs in Tennessee, the UK and Japan for a grand total 600k."

That's a grand total of 600k per year?

Timo | 02. November 2015

Will there be enough buyers for Leaf to reach that 100k is the question.

My bet is that Tesla beats Nissan with Model 3 because of the SC network. Currently Tesla is the only BEV manufacturer that has made any effort to make longer road trips possible in reasonable time. As long as this is the case Tesla will be the only BEV manufacturer with actually successful BEV models.

deeageux | 02. November 2015

Yes, capacity per year. Global capacity of 600k units per year.

At least when they launched the LEAF.

I have not heard they decommissioned any capacity.

The EV platform is just a modified version of the B platform now called V platform. So making gliders is not the issue.

The issue was assembling the cells then the packs. They have the capacity to assemble 200k battery backs in each of those countries.

Carlos had really high hopes for LEAF 1.0.

deeageux | 02. November 2015

@Timo

Nissan has found roughly 60k customers per year around the globe for 84 mile 24 kWh LEAF 1.0 in 2013 and 2014. This year is down in anticipation of 30 kWh 107 mile range LEAF 1.5.

LEAF 2.0 appears to get a 60 kWh ~200 mile range pack in top spec.

And given the module arrangement likely 40 kWh for the base model at still $29k before incentives.

I think they can find the extra 40k customers even with a base $35k Model S.

Some two car households don't require/insist on two road trip worthy cars. And rather save the $6k. Some want maximum efficiency. Some insist on having service nearby and not some Ranger service with dollars per mile plan.

Some don't yet trust a new startup without a long history. Some are just Nissan/LEAF fans. Hard to believe I know but they exist.

Some are anti-Tesla anti-Posh "BEV of the people" sorta buyer. The actor Joseph Gordon Levitt is one of these guys. Absolutely will not consider a Tesla because he is not "one of THOSE guys." He drives a LEAF. But he buys bespoke suits that cost what a LEAF replacement pack cost :)

deeageux | 02. November 2015

Oops another reason somebody might buy a LEAF 2.0 instead of Model 3. Nissan will have LEAF 2.0 on lots for sale TODAY. Model 3 will be a 6-12 month wait for some time. Then maybe 6 weeks way into the future. Past 2019.

Benz | 02. November 2015

@ deeageux

"My wager is LEAF is the first model to get to 100k in 2018."

Production capacity will apparently not be a problem for Nissan to deliver that many LEAF cars. As Nissan will be producing and shipping them to Nissan dealers up front, so that the customers can choose from the stock that will be available at the dealer lots. For sales that surely is an advantage (time).

But still, I think that Timo has made a crucial point.

@ Timo

"My bet is that Tesla beats Nissan with Model 3 because of the SC network. Currently Tesla is the only BEV manufacturer that has made any effort to make longer road trips possible in reasonable time. As long as this is the case Tesla will be the only BEV manufacturer with actually successful BEV models."

I have to agree with that.

But the question remains if Tesla Motors will have everything in place and under control in order to be able to produce and deliver 100,000+ Tesla Model 3 cars in 2018?

Grinnin'.VA | 02. November 2015

@ deeageux | November 2, 2015

[[ A majority of Americans seem unwilling to consider a BEV until they can afford one with a real world 300 mile range even if they have not drive over 150 miles in one day in the last five years. ]]

^^ I believe that a majority of American car owners have driven a car "over 150 miles in one day in the last five years." All it takes is one modest road trip.

Timo | 02. November 2015

75 miles one way. That's not far. A bit over one hour (or less if roads are good) of driving. Or just multiple shorter trips, like six separate 25 mile trips. You get quite a bit miles just by doing one complex shopping trip where you can't get everything you want from one place.

Benz | 02. November 2015

@ Grinnin

What is your view on the initial questions as mentioned in the first post of this thread?

"Which BEV model will be the first to reach 100,000+ deliveries in 1 calender year?
And in what year will that be realised?"

deeageux | 02. November 2015

I think the Supercharger Network is crucial to the BEV experience. Apparently not everyone agrees. In 2015 the World will buy 300k BEVs plus 200k PHEVs. And of the 300k BEVs only ~50k will have a range of over 110 EPA miles and be connected to the Supercharger Network. When the range jumps from 84 to 130-210 I have to believe there will be a significant jump in sales. Even with the Model 3 available.

Many car owners have not taken a single road trip in the last five years. What percentage it is I don't know for certain. I have not seen any data. I just have anecdotal data of friends and family. And I live in West Los Angeles not Manhattan.

SamO | 02. November 2015

2014 - 33,600 deliveries
2015 - ~50,000 deliveries/annum
2016 - ~70,000 deliveries/annum
2017 - ~100,000 deliveries/annum
2018 - ~250,000 deliveries/annum

This is the sales trajectory to date. ~50% growth. You can shift the numbers a bit, but if Model X sells in equal or greater numbers to the S, then likely 2017 or 2018 at the latest.

Benz | 02. November 2015

@ SamO

"2014 - 33,600 deliveries" ???

Where did you get that from?

Total annual Tesla Model S deliveries in 2014 were 31,655.

And the questions are about just one particular BEV model.

The Tesla Model S and the Tesla Model X are two different BEV models (although they share the same skateboard platform).

Therefore, we cannot add the annual delivery numbers to get a combined total of 100,000+ annual deliveries.

Nice try though.

SamO | 02. November 2015

@Benz,

Lol.

Well . . . then I'll (read review the call of the question more carefully) stick with 2018.

It's possible that X is a runaway hit given that the entry point is eventually lowered and they get to 2000 cars/week by the end of 2017.

Tesla could take out all seats and sell it for package delivery. That configuration would sell 30K worldwide.

However, with first deliveries of Model 3 in 2017 Q4 (soonest), I'm guessing a ramp to production of 3-5K/week pretty quickly due to increased battery supply from the Gigafactory and a simpler design will make both the Model 3 a 100K seller in 2018.

It's possible the Model X delivers in excess of 100K in 2018 as well.

Tiebreaker to the Model that delivers the most cars that year.

Benz | 02. November 2015

@ SamO

"It's possible the Model X delivers in excess of 100K in 2018 as well."

OK

I think that Tesla Motors will possibly deliver 100,000+ of the Tesla Model 3 in less than the first 8 months in 2018.

And surely they would need more than only the first 8 months in 2018 to achieve the 100,000+ Tesla Model X deliveries.

So in that respect the Tesla Model 3 would still be the winner, I think.

Grinnin'.VA | 02. November 2015

@ Benz | November 2, 2015

[[ @ Grinnin

[[ What is your view on the initial questions as mentioned in the first post of this thread? ]]

^^ I haven't offered an opinion about this before now because my magic crystal ball is a bit cloudy about the growth rates for BEV sales.
Nevertheless, here's my WAG:

I expect Leaf to reach the 100K milestone first, edging out the M3. which will reach this milestone the next year.
I guess that the milestone year will be 2018.
I project that M3 sales exceed 100K in 2019.
M3 sales will roughly match Leaf sales in 2021 with both of them topping 300K.

Note: I have little confidence in these projections.

Benz | 02. November 2015

But what if deliveries of both the Chevrolet Bolt and the second generation Nissan Leaf will start in January 2017?

Could they reach 100,00+ deliveries in 2017 already?

If not both, then which one is more likely than the other to reach 100,000+ deliveries in 2017?

johnse | 03. November 2015

@Benz
GM has stated a capacity of 30K Bolts. I doubt they have the battery supply needed for any more than that.

deeageux | 03. November 2015

Bolt EV so far is scheduled to sell in the US, Canada, and S Korea.

The LEAF is going to be sold in dozens of markets. LEAF is sold from Bhutan to Puerto Rico.

Red Sage ca us | 05. November 2015

The Tesla Model S already outsells the Nissan LEAF. The Chevrolet Bolt has an eventual annual production goal equivalent to how many of the LEAF that were sold, in the US alone, during 2014... And that would be at the expense of Volt sales, since they share the same supply chain for battery packs. The Tesla Model ≡ will be the first long range EV to sell/deliver in excess of 100,000 units in a single year... Unless the Model X ends up outselling the Model S at a 3:1 ratio worldwide, instead of only in the US...

MODEL X 2017
MODEL ≡ 2018

deeageux | 06. November 2015

Tesla outsells the lame duck 84 mile range 2015 LEAF in its last year when many customers are waiting for the 2016 107 mile range LEAF. Well at least 107 in two of three trims.

That does not mean Model 3 will beat the 130-210 mile range LEAF to 100k units.

Timo | 06. November 2015

As soon as Tesla gets production so high that Model 3 can reach 100k it sells that much. So the question is which is there first, desire for 100k Leaf cars or Tesla production for Model 3.

Model 3 will beat Leaf in sales for sure as soon as they get production high enough to do that just because it will be better car.

Like Red Sage said, Model S already outsells Leaf, and that's three times more expensive car. Model 3 will basically be just smaller and cheaper Model S.

deeageux | 06. November 2015

Crappy 84 mile LEAF has demand for 60k units worldwide.

Model Year 2018 LEAF released Q1 or Q2 2017 will have capacity for 100k units on day one.

130-210 mile range LEAF will almost certainly have 100k unit global demand.

On top of that Tesla price is firm or firm minus $1k.

LEAF price is flexible. Plus it has subsidized leasing.

Effectively, LEAF can be 30% cheaper for roughly same range.

There are plenty of high rollers here that can't conceive of not "buying the best" if the difference is $10k or less.

But for many $5k-$10k is a lot of money which alters demand.

Tesla sells 50k copies of the best sedan in the world. The larger market buys about 35 million sedans that are not the best in the world.

Red Sage ca us | 06. November 2015

Tesla Motors will not have to worry about demand for the Model ≡ at all. Ever. That is not going to be a problem.

It's nice that someone, anyone, has a positive outlook for an optimistic result in the EV segment for offerings from traditional automobile manufacturers. I'm not going to join you in that optimism though. Because I am very certain that no matter how well the LEAF sells, it will still be dwarfed in every territory and region by sales of Versa and Sentra instead.

Here, compare US Sales in recent years:
LEAF VOLT MODEL S
2011 9,674 7,671 0
2012 9,819 23,461 2,558
2013 22,610 23,094 18,195
2014 30,200 18,805 16,550
2015* 14,868 11,299 19,800

CRUZE VERSA SENTRA
2011 232,588 99,730 114,991
2012 237,758 113,327 106,395
2013 248,224 117,352 129,143
2014 273,060 139,781 183,268
2015* 193,680 123,687 169,244

* First ten months, YTD.

Benz | 08. November 2015

First of all Tesla Motors will need to make further investments in expansion of their production capacity. And I think that we will hear more about that in 2016.

2016 is going to be an interesting year with regard to the Tesla Model S. Will deliveries of the Tesla Model S keep on increasing?

In the first three quarters of 2015 Tesla Motors has already delivered more Tesla Model S cars than in all four quarters of 2014. And the total for 2015 will be about 50,000. That's a significant growth of more than 50%.

But what about 2016? Will Tesla Motors deliver more Tesla Model S cars in 2016 than in 2015? And will that continue to be the case in 2017 as well?

Benz | 08. November 2015

In February 2016 Tesla Motors will release it's ER Q4 2015 Shareholder Letter. Then we shall know what their guidance for 2016 will be. I guess that they will give one combined total annual figure for vehicle deliveries in 2016 (of both Tesla Model S and Tesla Model X). Although they could also give a separate guidance figure for each vehicle model as well.

I think that it's highly likely that total combined annual guidance will be somewhere between 80,000 and 90,000 deliveries in 2016.

And I also think that in 2016 there will be more Tesla Model S deliveries than Tesla Model X deliveries. And it will be unlikely that there will be more than 60,000 Tesla Model S deliveries in 2016. Therefore I am expecting Tesla Model S deliveries in 2016 to increase by not more than 25% (compared to 2015).

Grinnin'.VA | 08. November 2015

@ Benz | November 8, 2015

[[ And the total for 2015 will be about 50,000. That's a significant growth of more than 50% ]]

^^ FWIW, my estimate for 2015 deliveries is 48,000 +- 1000. I'd guess that they have maybe a 10% chance of delivering more than 50,000.

Of course, they year-year growth is something close to 50%, which is pretty damn good, but a bit short of what they hoped to achieve.

Red Sage ca us | 08. November 2015

I believe that Tesla Motors sales of Model S and Model X will likely be very close to each other during 2016. I don't think Tesla really cares one way or the other, because they get paid either way. It will probably be something like 55% for one, and 45% for the other, overall and worldwide.

That said, I do believe there will be a distinct split in the sales of Generation II vehicles when comparing domestic US Deliveries versus international orders. In particular, I figure that for Model S, around 40% of Deliveries will be in the US, and 60% international. I think the Model X will be the opposite distribution, with 60% sold in the US and only 40% of Deliveries made to international buyers.

I do not believe that US sales of Model S will go down, they'll likely increase a bit... But ultimately, more of the Model X will be Delivered on these shores during 2016. And I expect that Tesla will find domestic sales of Model X increasing at a faster rate than expected, through the release of Model ≡.

I hope they are ready to be ready for the upcoming onslaught.

Benz | 09. November 2015

@ Red Sage

Your post from November 5th:

"The Tesla Model ≡ will be the first long range EV to sell/deliver in excess of 100,000 units in a single year... Unless the Model X ends up outselling the Model S at a 3:1 ratio worldwide, instead of only in the US...

MODEL X 2017
MODEL ≡ 2018"

AND

Your post from November 8th:

"I do not believe that US sales of Model S will go down, they'll likely increase a bit... But ultimately, more of the Model X will be Delivered on these shores during 2016. And I expect that Tesla will find domestic sales of Model X increasing at a faster rate than expected, through the release of Model ≡.

I hope they are ready to be ready for the upcoming onslaught."

Both of your abovementioned posts combined actually do make sense, I think.

In 2017 awareness and acceptance of EVs will be at a much higher level than in 2015. Supercharger network and also charging infrastructure in general will be much more expanded than it is in 2015. And EVs from Tesla Motors (both S and X) will be more popular than they are in 2015. But the Tesla Model X will be more popular in than the Tesla Model S in 2017, because a significantly higher portion of the demand for the Tesla Model X in 2017 will come from Europe and Asia. And this could actually lead to 100,000+ Tesla Model X deliveries in 2017.

Further investments in 2016 for the expansion of their production capacity at Fremont will be crucial though.

Timo | 09. November 2015

I believe that Model S sales will continue to exceed Model X sales pretty much forever in Europe. At least if their prices are similar. Model X is just too big, and as such impractical for majority of people.

Red Sage ca us | 09. November 2015

Benz: Yes. I believe that the 'best case scenario' for Model X means that the Model ≡ might be delayed to a 2018 launch. Neither Model S nor Model X are meant to be mass market vehicles. I think that Tesla Motors is probably figuring for sales of around 50,000 of each, perhaps stretching to 60,000 of each, per year maximum.

However, if it ends up that they can move 150,000-to-180,000 of the Model X alone in 2017... While Model S sales stay at the 50,000-to-60,000 level... There will not be enough capacity at Fremont to allow timely delivery of all three vehicles until 2018.

In other words, if you are really waiting to buy a Model ≡ in 2017, you'd better hope that my highly optimistic expectations for Model X sales falls far short of the mark.

Timo: I understand that the size of American vehicles in general seems daunting to Europeans. What I'm confused by though, is that European automakers build cars that are larger than the Model S, and no one complains about them at all. Where are the people complaining that those cars are 'too big' for European roads?

I am also confused that people keep pointing to AUDI A6/A7, BMW 5-Series, and Mercedes-Benz S-Class, as if they are direct competitors to Model S... Yet no one says those cars don't sell to Europeans... Nor do they say that A8, 7-Series, and S-Class -- the actual competitors to Model S -- don't sell in Europe either.

The Model X doesn't have to be the right size for the majority of people in Europe. Neither do the Q7, X5, GLE, or Cayenne. It only has to sell those Europeans who want to buy a Model X.

Timo | 10. November 2015

I didn't say that it is too big for everyone. Just for majority of people. That is why Model S, which is main competition to Model X, will be selling more. For majority of people here there just is no point to buy seven-seater SUV.

If there were no Model S then I would bet Model X would sell very well to Europeans, almost as well as Model S does.

Benz | 10. November 2015

@ Timo

Yes, the majority of people in Europe buy compact cars (VW Golf, Audi A3, Renault Clio, Opel Astra, Peugeot 308, etc.), but that's most of the time just because of the limited amount they are prepared to spend on a new car, I think.

In Europe there is a market for all kinds of vehicles in all the available segments.

I think that people will first need to get comfortable with the functionality and the durability of the Falcon Wing Doors. I think that this is very very very critical. And if that realy does go well, than the Tesla Model X will gain a lot of popularity, and not only in Europe. Because that's something new and something different. Something apart from the mainstream vehicles. A kind of like the next step in the evolution of vehicle design. When it's better than what we currently have, then everybody will want to have it.

There was a time when mobile phones did not have touch-screans. Today, only the very cheap mobile phones do not have a touch-screan.

Timo | 10. November 2015

I haven't bought Model S because it is too big. I probably will buy Model 3 just because it is smaller, not because it is cheaper. I would not even consider Model X. Cool car, but not for me.

I believe most of the people buying cars buy it because they need it, not because it is just new and shiny. If the car does not match what you need, you don't buy it.

Benz | 11. November 2015

@ Timo

"I haven't bought Model S because it is too big. I probably will buy Model 3 just because it is smaller, not because it is cheaper."

I just want to be sure that I understand you correctly.

Do you mean you can afford to buy a Tesla Model S, but you haven't bought it because it's too big, and NOT because it's too expensive?

Is that correct?

Timo | 11. November 2015

Yes

Timo | 11. November 2015

I would like to have Gen 3 platform based sportcar if possible, but that might be a bit too expensive to me. Or not. We'll see. Also I have been waiting for one more SC a bit more north here to be able to comfortably travel between my parents house and my own.

Benz | 12. November 2015

So far only two Plug-In car models have reached and crossed the 100,000 mark (just not in one calender year):

Nissan Leaf (January 2014)
Chevrolet Volt / Opel Ampera (October 2015)

And the Tesla Model S will do that in December 2015.

But which Plug-In car models will follow?

finman100 | 12. November 2015

Doesn't the Volt have a gas engine? why is that included here? I used to plug-in my Jeep (block heater) way back too, but it was no EV!

Benz | 13. November 2015

@ finman100

Yes, the Chevrolet Volt / Opel Ampera does have a gas engine, so it's not a BEV. But still I mentioned it, because there would otherwise only be the Nissan Leaf to be mentioned for reaching that 100,000 mark. We haven't seen much success to that extent yet. But that will change soon.

And I think that the Chevrolet Volt / Opel Ampera has had it's share in the Plug-In revolution in the past 5 years, and that it will also have a substantial share in the coming years as well. Specially in the US. The second generation Chevrolet Volt is better and looks great, and it will attract more buyers away from buying ICE vehicles.

finman100 | 13. November 2015

Okay, no problem. I would call any car with the ability to use shore power a plug-in. If it has a gas engine, then NOT a BEV. Yes, yes, a few plug-ins do alot of EV miles, but if it has a tailpipe...NOT a BEV. My own viewpoint, that's all.

Benz | 18. November 2015

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV is doing well both in Japan and in Europe. And it will be sold in the US as from Q2 2016.

The Mitsubishi Outlander PHEV the next to reach the 100,000 (total cumulative) deliveries mark in 2016?

Red Sage ca us | 20. November 2015

I wrote, "The Model X doesn't have to be the right size for the majority of people in Europe. Neither do the Q7, X5, GLE, or Cayenne. It only has to sell [to] those Europeans who want to buy a Model X."

I'm pretty sure that was in English.

Benz | 22. November 2015

@ Red Sage

Your post from November 5th:
----------------------------

"The Tesla Model ≡ will be the first long range EV to sell/deliver in excess of 100,000 units in a single year... Unless the Model X ends up outselling the Model S at a 3:1 ratio worldwide, instead of only in the US...

MODEL X 2017
MODEL ≡ 2018"

AND

Your post from November 8th:

"I do not believe that US sales of Model S will go down, they'll likely increase a bit... But ultimately, more of the Model X will be Delivered on these shores during 2016. And I expect that Tesla will find domestic sales of Model X increasing at a faster rate than expected, through the release of Model ≡.

I hope they are ready to be ready for the upcoming onslaught."

My post from November 9th:
--------------------------

"Both of your abovementioned posts combined actually do make sense, I think.

In 2017 awareness and acceptance of EVs will be at a much higher level than in 2015. Supercharger network and also charging infrastructure in general will be much more expanded than it is in 2015. And EVs from Tesla Motors (both S and X) will be more popular than they are in 2015. But the Tesla Model X will be more popular in than the Tesla Model S in 2017, because a significantly higher portion of the demand for the Tesla Model X in 2017 will come from Europe and Asia. And this could actually lead to 100,000+ Tesla Model X deliveries in 2017.

Further investments in 2016 for the expansion of their production capacity at Fremont will be crucial though."

My post of November 22nd (today):
---------------------------------

There is actually one factor that I would like to mention here as well. And that is that the Tesla Model S is becoming more and more popular every year. People have seen the car driving around for more than three years already. People have had the time to accept the Tesla Model S as a viable option for their daily driving needs. And that is something that still has to happen for the Tesla Model X. So that actually means that the Tesla Model S has a head start. The Tesla Model X doesn't have that yet. It will take at least a year (or a bit more) in order to become as popular as the Tesla Model S.

What I am trying to say is that we might see a different scenario in 2017. Meaning that their might be more deliveries of the Tesla Model S than the Tesla Model X in 2017. With a result of 100,000+ deliveries of the Tesla Model S (instead of the Tesla Model X) in 2017.

It's all about how fast the popularity of each model can gain traction. And the difference is that the Tesla Model S has had a head start. And this is something we should not ignore.

Red Sage ca us | 22. November 2015

Benz: A good point. However, the Model X garnered three times as many Reservations in less time than the Model S did. This tells me it is already very popular, and will hit the ground running. Yes, Model S sales will increase, simply because Tesla Motors will sell you whatever you order... But I believe Tesla should be prepared for the eventuality that Model X sales will increase at a vastly quicker rate than they have seen thus far with the Model S. And that rate will go up exponentially for the Model ≡, because they are likely to have 150,000 reservations before the first Production car rolls out of Fremont.

Timo | 23. November 2015

That's the brand getting more popular. People start to notice the car and trust the manufacturer.

JuJoo | 23. November 2015

Hopefully their website servers can handle the paramount of online traffic crowding in March. People are going to jump on reservations the moment it's open.

Gotta get the reservation in before it crashes!

Benz | 27. November 2015

How many Chevrolet Volt cars will be delivered to customers in the US in 2016?

Red Sage ca us | 29. November 2015

Benz: Per GoodCarBadCar, 11,299 of the 2015 Chevrolet Volt have been sold thus far in the US. They don't have stats yet for the 2016 version, which has been said to have limited release this year.

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