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Volkswagen is pegging its fate to a major bet on electric cars

Volkswagen is pegging its fate to a major bet on electric cars

How do you interpret this news? I cannot grab the point. I don't see any source of this claim in the article.

http://qz.com/522844/volkswagen-is-pegging-its-fate-to-a-major-bet-on-el...

JuJoo | 13. Oktober 2015

At this point, whether true or not, it's a desperation move. They hardly have anything else to lose, so the only logical decision would be to go to where the enthusiasm and the future is pointing to: EVs.

That's exactly what Musk wants anyway. It'll only benefit him, whether they fail or succeed.

Let's just hope that those VW EV's dont have some sort of cheat software, too. :) Joke. Sort of.

Tesla-David | 13. Oktober 2015

This is great news, and signals a major shift to EVs in the future. This is exactly what Elon Musk wants to happen, and will only benefit Tesla going forward.

Pluto is a Planet | 13. Oktober 2015

It'll benefit everyone >.>

Mike83 | 13. Oktober 2015

It will be hard to cheat on an EV but who knows?

JeffreyR | 13. Oktober 2015

Umm @ quesder here are the sources from the article:

"VW executive Herbert Diess said in a statement...."

and this press release is the statement:

http://www.volkswagenag.com/content/vwcorp/info_center/en/news/2015/10/V...

Wolfsburg, 2015-10-13

Volkswagen Brand Board of Management takes strategic decisions

• Accelerated implementation of the efficiency program creates room for
reorientation
• Streamlined processes leverage further cost-saving potential, including
cuts in fixed costs
• Investments to be reduced by 1 billion euros per year compared with
planning – combined with prioritization of projects for the future
• Product decisions formulated
• New Phaeton will be electric
• New Modular Electric Toolkit planned

"The newly-formed Volkswagen Brand Board of Management took further strategic decisions at a special meeting...."

Captain_Zap | 14. Oktober 2015

For starters, the VW Board of Management needs a new Board of Management.

Mike83 | 14. Oktober 2015

VW has about $30 billion cash but will that be enough for the fines and criminal charges? Also will their sales drop?
I don't think they can afford to do much with EVs for now. This will take time to see the damage.

mcdonalk | 14. Oktober 2015

If I could buy and have serviced an eGolf in AZ, I would buy one today. I cannot wait for the Model 3.

JuJoo | 14. Oktober 2015

Well, the CEO was already changed up. Now for the rest of the Board...

Bubba2000 | 15. Oktober 2015

Besides VW, other diesel and even gasoline autos may pollute a lot more, than their lab tests show, in real life driving. So the political pressure will be to develop BEVs, not only for VW, but also for others. I am surprised that none of the auto companies chose to license Tesla technology or even its Supercharger Network. Even Toyota and Mercedes who were large investors in Tesla.

What are the ICE makers thinking? Develop their own global charging network? Each different from the other? Make their own batteries? Porsche wants to use 800V chargers. Is that practical and safe?

JuJoo | 16. Oktober 2015

Many of the big auto companies EV concepts are just that: concept. I find it hard to believe that all of them will be coming to the EV market anytime soon.

Although, I do know that Nissan has exclusive charging stations, like Tesla. It's going to take a long time before charging options are more standardized. Everything is still in development.

finman100 | 16. Oktober 2015

Uh, it's just a Chademo port on the Leaf. Not Nissan exclusive. Other EVs have them (Kia Soul, Mitsubishi iMiev).

CCS (or SAE combo, whatever) is the fast charge for VW, BMW, Mercedes and GM.

Some dual-format fast chargers exist so no matter who pulls in, you can fast charge via Chademo or CCS! leaded or unleaded 'pumps'.

Bubba2000 | 16. Oktober 2015

The ICE companies are not in total denial. They know that any serious shift to BEVs would take $Billions in development/design, production of autos from ground up. Can not just strap batteries in the trunk. Then would have to spend more $Bs in producing batteries. All while writing off their ICE investment. Don't need to be a CPA to figure out that their income statements, cash flow and balance sheet would all suffer.

The book "The Innovator's Dilemma" addresses some of these issues. At some point the BEV tech will reach the tipping point. In my opinion, the big impediment is that the $/KW-hr and KW-hr/kg have not reached the tipping point. The GF in conjunction with newer chemistry, electrodes, economies of scale could achieve the tipping point. Model 3 sedan and SUV would have to be something that is simple, cost effecting and mass produced.

After the MX, I think that Tesla will be much more conscious about sticking to simple design and production.

deeageux | 17. Oktober 2015

CCS is the standard subscribed to by the Detroit and European companies.

CHAdeMO by the Japanese and Korean companies.

Model Y, CUV variant of the Model 3, will have Falcon Wing Doors per Musk.

negarholger | 17. Oktober 2015

This is the start of the shift... the other big companies can ignore Tesla but they can not ignore VW.

Will VW survive? It can't fail as the German government has to rescue them if needed. maybe they will sell assets like Porsche and Audi...

Red Sage ca us | 17. Oktober 2015

The issues that other manufacturers face in transitioning to electric drive is outlined fairly well here:

"It's actually even worse than I ever imagined..."

Amplify Mentor Event: Marc Tarpenning (Tesla) (1:10:44)

Bubba2000: The problem is that to the installed management of traditional automobile manufacturers, the 'tipping point' is further away. They wouldn't be able to match Tesla Motors' efforts at $240 per kWh if they only had to pay $60 per kWh. In their minds, battery technology is not worth it, because they want the profit margin to be larger, much larger -- probably somewhere in the $2 to $20 per kWh range, before they would want to do mass market production of EVs on their own. Since they don't care for the EVs, they only seek $500 per kWh 'solutions' instead. Luckily, regulations for fuel economy and emissions will move them in that direction much, much earlier.

The act of manufacturing is not simple. There is an immense amount of complexity involved. The trick is to make it look easier than it really is... It takes a whole lot of hard work to reach that point. Designing something simply, to allow less complexity in its manufacturing, may not have the desired result. Better to design the correct product the right way, then engineer the process by which its individual components are assembled as efficiently as possible during manufacturing.

Foor Foot Drive: Simplicity in itself!