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Does using superchargers only harm the battery more than regular chargers?

Does using superchargers only harm the battery more than regular chargers?

I'm going to have to rely on only superchargers for my Tesla model 3, I'm wondering if superchargers negatively impact the life of the battery more than regular chargers since it charges much faster

Wilber | 19. Februar 2020

Which kind of superchargers? the "Urban ones with 72kw power? or the standard ones at 120kw, or the new faster kind?

Teslanene | 19. Februar 2020

There is this guy on tweeter @mcarbon who has over 100k miles mostly all super charging and has not seen any impact on the battery. Just don’t charge over 90%.

ellett | 19. Februar 2020

Charging rate, i.e. level 2 vs level 3, doesn't impact battery life nearly as much as the SoC to which you charge. Stay below 90% and you won't see any significant impact on battery life compared to level 2 charging.

Note that this is based on owners who have been charging using the commonly deployed V2 120-145kW or Urban 72kW Superchargers. There's no data yet to tell whether charging at V3 250kW will have any appreciable negative affect on battery life.

Earl and Nagin ... | 20. Februar 2020

The battery management system will reduce the charging speed before damage will be done to the battery. People will grouse about how their charging speed decreases as their battery gets older but it won't do any significant harm the battery.

Magic 8 Ball | 20. Februar 2020

● My sources say no.

yudansha™ | 20. Februar 2020

What M8B said.

teslamazing | 20. Februar 2020

What teslanene said

yudansha™ | 20. Februar 2020

What teslamazing said.

RES IPSA | 20. Februar 2020

From Tesla's website...

Does Supercharging affect my battery?
The peak-charging rate of the battery may decrease slightly after a large number of high-rate charging sessions, such as those at Superchargers. To ensure maximum driving range and battery safety, the battery charge rate is decreased when the battery is too cold, when it is nearly full or when its condition changes with usage and age. These changes in the condition of the battery may increase total Supercharger time by a few minutes over time.

andy.connor.e | 20. Februar 2020

fortunately, you have the Tesla benefit of having the most advanced battery management system. As it has been stated, there is no noticeable difference. Just do not charge above 90% and let it fall below 20% too often.

vmulla | 20. Februar 2020

No.
Here's my experience with the battery - watch from 1min mark https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d8_CiYYkP-8

teslamazing | 20. Februar 2020

Had mine since July 18’ and only used SCs at least twice a week. Still have about 309 ish at 100%

Also never really followed the 20 to 80-90 % rule tbh

LR RWD

session just last week
https://imgur.com/a/LODtu1L

teslamazing | 20. Februar 2020

Went past 95% only one time to charge to 100%. Otherwise usually 90-93%

FISHEV | 20. Februar 2020

"I'm wondering if superchargers negatively impact the life of the battery more than regular chargers since it charges much faster."

Yes. Fast charging causes the batteries to degrade faster. The science on the Li-ion batteries is straight forward and the degradation starts when the battery is made.

www.batteryuniversity.com

I charge exclusively on fast charging, 90% Tesla SC's and some EVgo's and EA's. You can see how it has impacted my battery degradation via the Battery Health app from StatsApp for Tesla. I've got more battery degradation than 70% of other Tesla users.

https://imgur.com/vQwhJlO

Here's that actual battery degradation after 18,000 miles of super charging.

https://imgur.com/yI1pBb6

teslamazing | 20. Februar 2020

As always, ignore posts by fishev

coselectric | 20. Februar 2020

Dear @OP, you may already know this, but @FISHEV is an evil disinformation generator with apparent psychological issues and/or ulterior anti-Tesla motives. Read his posts at your own peril.

derotam | 20. Februar 2020

...and if you are interested, please actually read EVERYTHING on the subject at www.batteryuniversity.com, and then realize that some of the information on there is dated and/or may not be relevant to Tesla's specific battery composition and design. Things in this arena aren't as simple as some people make it out to be.