Forums

Limit performence on Model 3

Limit performence on Model 3

Hello. Will it be possible to set performance limitations on model 3 when eg. children will use the car?

Regards
Roger Heglum

PhillyGal | 04. Januar 2017

Hey Roger,
There is currently a "valet mode" on Model S and X, so we expect that to be possible for Model 3.

As for a "I'm letting my teenager drive my super fast car" mode, no one knows. It's been talked about with the S/X for a while but again, no one knows for 3.

dave.m.mcdonough | 04. Januar 2017

Teenager gets a $500 Honda. If it stays shiny-side-up until graduation then maybe help them buy something better.

Red Sage ca us | 04. Januar 2017

"A man's got to know his limitations." -- Clint Eastwood as Harry Callahan, 'Magnum Force' (1973)

EaglesPDX | 04. Januar 2017

If you look on the Consumer Reports website, they have tested some devices that plug into the car to monitor teen driving.

Don't know if the T3 will have the diagnostic port these monitoring devices have, if so you could at least monitor the kids behavior.

With the 3 being a bit more of a family car vs. the S and X, it would be nice if Tesla offered such service. Seems it would be easy to program in a car with AutoPilot and Autonomous driving. That Tesla has not done it yet is surprising. It may have to do with the buyer demographic to date which is older, higher income and less likely to have teenage children.

bmwgs | 04. Januar 2017

@dave.m.mcdonough
Like a $1000 Honda.

Haggy | 05. Januar 2017

I'd like to see that feature, and none of my kids drove my Model S or even asked to drive it. My son is the one who would be most likely to want to drive it but I don't think he'd have the nerve to ask. That's because he was very instrumental in me getting it. He let his girlfriend drive my previous car without my permission and that was the end of that car. Good acceleration has its drawbacks.

jefjes | 05. Januar 2017

I'm still trying to decide if I'll let my kids or grandkids near the car or even in it at all much less drive it. I feel lucky my wife doesn't drive so it won't be an issue as to whether she will drive it. She probably will be the only other person I let get in the car though...lol.

roger.heglum | 09. Januar 2017

Since safety is an important topic for Tesla, I hope this will be in place.
My teenagers are going to have to borrow the car, and in lack of experience, I'm not overjoyed to have them running around in such a fast car.
My wife is also an "off and on" driver. :-)

andy.connor.e | 09. Januar 2017

If there are children in the car, who are you limiting the performance on? If you feel that you need to limit the performance when a certain person is driving around with children, then i think the real problem is that you shouldnt be trusting said person to be driving around with children.

smule1720 | 09. Januar 2017

I asked the same question in a letter to Mr. Musk dated 7/12/16, sent shortly after the incident in Florida, e-mailed and snail mailed, more so at the behest of my wife. I have yet to receive a response formal or informal from Telsa.

My biggest concern is I'll have two teenage boys who will come of driving age shortly after the anticipated delivery of our reserved Model 3. Although I'm mature, and I'd like to think experienced enough, to enjoy the fast aspects of the the car, I'm not so sure about my two boys...and having the option to limit it's performance (or enhance it) depending upon the occupant/driver would be fantastic, not only from a safety perspective, but it might save me some coin in tire expenses.

andy.connor.e | 09. Januar 2017

@smule1720

Perhaps a lesson in discipline?

Frank99 | 09. Januar 2017

smule -
I fully agree with you. Sometimes experience is the best teacher of things like discipline; but I'd like to maximize the chance that my children survive their experiences to learn from them. Teenagers do stupid things in cars all the time - heck, they used to do stupid things in 40 HP VW Bugs when I was young - but they're a lot more likely to survive doing stupid things in a 0-60 in 10 second car than in a 0-60 in 3 second car.
My kids are 15.4 years old now (yes, they want to go get their learner's permits in a couple of weeks), so they'll have licenses shortly before I get my 3. I don't expect they'll drive it anytime in the foreseeable future - but I'm sure it'll happen once or twice before they reach an age of wisdom. I fully expect the 3 to have a "Valet" mode, and I fully expect to engage it for them if they drive without me. I'll likely do the same for my wife.

Frank

APERTIERRA | 10. Januar 2017

If your kids are not ready to drive your "nice toy"... then get them something they can afford to break... like they said before "a $1.000 honda" until they get experience enough. The problem is not the car being limited... is the parent letting his child taking the car. Would you let your kid with a brand new license driving a Ferrari 350? same idea....

dave.m.mcdonough | 10. Januar 2017

My half brother seemed like the reckless type so I helped my mom out and fixed up a $500 beater for him. I knew it wouldn't stay shiny-side-up, and it didn't. Rinse and repeat, now his license is suspended.
If he turned out to be responsible, he would have gotten a much better one.

Never buy a new car for the kid's first, especially one like this. Even good drivers catch some hard lessons early on.
I have a sneaking suspicion that there will be an epidemic of fender benders because electrics have quick torque, and people aren't going to stop being late through intersections.

smule1720 | 10. Januar 2017

@andy.connor.e - perhaps, but discipline is subjective, I know many disciplined morons, I'm thinking more of sound judgment, which is usually lacking w/ inexperienced young drivers...the tire wear on these cars due to torque is substantial....Ha!

@Frank99 - Ha! Yes, I was once an inexperienced teenager, who slipped the clutch several times on a few 911s (glorified bugs), losing the tail end a lot, and learned to drive M3s at limit, but I'll never forget the patience my father had, as I learned to drive a stick...and the responsibility I learned that came with it...

@apertierra - starting at $35k, it's a family car, the kids won't get a car, but will be expected to learn on this one, no other car maker is making this claim:

"All Tesla vehicles produced in our factory - including Model 3 - will have the hardware needed for full self-driving capability at a safety level substantially greater than that of a human driver" "Tesla will take responsibility for any incident involving a failure of Tesla's systems."

And no other car in this segment/price range has the capability of being as quick as a super car...which is fantastic...but I think the risk to other drivers in a $500 Honda will be greater than a car with the aforementioned safety features...ha! It will be interesting to see how the insurance industry reacts, you'd think policy premiums will go down, but that's probably a pipe dream....

smule1720 | 10. Januar 2017

When I say risk to other drivers in a $500 Honda (Beater), I mean to other drivers/property, with an inexperienced driver at the wheel of the said "Beater"

Red Sage ca us | 10. Januar 2017

Experience is the ability to recognize a mistake when you make it again.

What new drivers need is practice and instruction.

There are certain cars that I presume EVERY stop is an EMERGENCY STOP. Particularly those top heavy econoboxes rolling 165mm or less wide tires. I give them all a wide berth and extra car lengths of space, just in case.

Why would you expect a Model 3 to be 'more safe' with the performance profile of a Yaris?

Do you expect a Lexus LS to be 'less safe' than a Corolla?

smule1720 | 10. Januar 2017

@ red sage ca us - I agree, do you mean "before you make it again" or is that wisdom?

Experience is the knowledge or mastery of an event or subject gained through involvement in or exposure to it. If the car's technology is suppose to be superior to that of a humans in this regard (safety), then we'll all be new to the experience of not experiencing it when it comes to this particular aspect, it sure will be interesting...

I do think a horse is more safe in different aspects than a car, but a car is more safe than a horse in other aspects...fortunately or unfortunately, it looks like we've finally bred a mule with a thoroughbred, I would just like to be able to control how it gets whipped and when...since I'm boarding it....

Red Sage ca us | 10. Januar 2017

smule1720: No. I meant "when". Because we all have those moments where we say to ourselves, "Ah! I should have known better... This has happened before." That is a function of experience. Usually, that is where wisdom comes in, and we are more vigilant about recognizing potential issues BEFORE they happen again. ;-)

I think you would be killed just about as instantly when crashing a 120 MPH horse as you would a 180 MPH car. :-D

smule1720 | 10. Januar 2017

Ahhh...yes...i.e. like when my wife told me we were having another child, just kidding...if you've experienced that, then you know why I want to put a "Stymie" mode in addition to the anticipated "Insane" and "Ludicrous" modes on this thing...just trying being more vigilant...ha!

smule1720 | 10. Januar 2017

I'd like to have the control to give everyone else on the road 10 seconds to get out of the way verses 3 seconds, as Frank99 mentions above...because there are people like me that will be putting teenagers in these cars...

smule1720 | 17. Januar 2017

Interesting article I read today:

http://jalopnik.com/the-latest-tesla-lawsuit-proves-how-important-human-...

Not posting this to defend my argument for the ability to limit the acceleration, more so for discussion of the logic behind it, from another perspective...Tesla's not Mr. Son's, the article gets interesting the more you read...

Embarrassment and perhaps shame may be a large driver behind Mr. Son's dispute...

I guess the crux of my post is wondering if Tesla can code something that would allow the owner to reduce the fallibility index when you have a more "fallible" individual behind the wheel....

topher | 17. Januar 2017

This quote says it all: "How could they make me out to be such a shameless person to put my life on the line that way? They boast that Tesla X is the safest car, but to my family, it is a name that we will never forget."

In other words, why isn't MY SERVANT taking the blame for me? Isn't that what servants are for?

Thank you kindly.

Red Sage ca us | 17. Januar 2017

Faster horses, Slower cars!

Badbot | 17. Januar 2017

"I guess the crux of my post is wondering if Tesla can code something that would allow the owner to reduce the fallibility index when you have a more "fallible" individual behind the wheel...."

if human = crash then disregard action
if not equal to crash then save data for neural net.

so bad drivers get ignored.
good drivers train computer.

now was that hard? if it was then we ignore you.

see how that works

hobowankenobi | 17. Januar 2017

Count my vote as one that thinks there should be a driver-in-training mode.

If there can be an Insane or Ludicrous mode.....please stop saying that driver-in-training mode is not possible. It is possible.

It would be an easy to implement. and it could be a simple slider; with a admin lock out. Should be no harder to operate than limiting the maximum volume on an iPhone. Limit torque/acceleration, and/or top speed.

This should be done ASAP, and would actually be a great selling feature. A safety feature that will never be available in an ICE vehicle! It would actually sell cars.

If they wanted to truly innovate the way we all know they can......then there could a full featured driver-in-training mode, that would nag about tailgating, speeding, stopping too close to car in front, giving pedestrians and cyclists enough room, and so on.

And if the car generated and delivered automatic reports of detected good and bad habits....that could open the door to truly training new drivers to be GOOD drivers. Nearly everybody with a new teenage driver would want this, and would pay a premium for it.

Running an old beater around and banging into things, trying to keep the greasy side down while learning to drive is so 1978.

If Telsa doesn't enable this soon, like on the M3 rollout, others will.

Badbot | 17. Januar 2017

valet close enough?

topher | 17. Januar 2017

Forget driver-in-training mode. How about train-the-driver mode?

The problem of who has priority is not going to have an easy answer until we go back to only one entity gets a vote.

Thank you kindly.

Frank99 | 17. Januar 2017

Wouldn't it be great if Valet mode morphed into not just a limited-power mode, but a follow-the-speed-limit mode also?

hobowankenobi - I fully agree with you.

smule1720 | 18. Januar 2017

@hobowankenobi - yes!!!!!!!!

smule1720 | 23. Januar 2017
smule1720 | 23. Januar 2017

So we know it's possible, will Tesla allow owners to whip it; or walk it by the reins, when junior's in the saddle???

M3forMe | 23. Januar 2017

Both of my sons (18 and 19) had asked if they can drive my M3 after deliver. My answer is YES after We learn how to drive the EV correctly. Show them how powerful the M3 is compare to ICE and trust them.

M3forMe | 23. Januar 2017

Both of my sons (18 and 19) had asked if they can drive my M3 after deliver. My answer is YES after We learn how to drive the EV correctly. Show them how powerful the M3 is compare to ICE and trust them.

Red Sage ca us | 24. Januar 2017

M3forMe: I believe that is the proper strategy. My Uncle John made sure both his Sons could drive his Oldsmobile 442 with skill before unleashing them on the world in a Ford Pinto. Make sure the kids know how to drive, teach them, then don't worry.

Twiglett | 24. Januar 2017

my easy fix is to have my teenage son learn to drive in our LEAF first.
he will only see the Model ☰ from the passenger seat until he learns how to drive properly.
I'm not about to blame Tesla for not having an option that no other car has.

Red Sage ca us | 24. Januar 2017

Twiglett: Kids that know how to drive were the original Autopilot 2.0 ... The Autopilot 1.0 was a horse that knew the way home. ;-)

Bill Korea | 24. Januar 2017

I always chuckle when I see a vehicle with a "limited" model logo. Why would anyone want to advertise their vehicle as being limited, when others want to project imposing power? Without the advertising, plenty of power is fine, as long as it is balanced with proper control. Or was that an important balance of power and responsibility, or freedom and responsibility? Anyway, we often don't do well with the responsibility part.

Red Sage ca us | 24. Januar 2017

For years I wondered why the Ford LTD wasn't just called the 'Limited' instead. Apparently it didn't stand for anything at all, they just liked the way those letters sounded together. Coincidentally, they just happened to be my Dad's initials and he was apparently a lifelong Ford fan.

dave.m.mcdonough | 24. Januar 2017

LOL Red Sage "There are certain cars that I presume EVERY stop is an EMERGENCY STOP."

I thought this of every car when I visited CA. They love to stand on the brakes!!

smule1720 | 24. Januar 2017

@ Red Sage ca us:

Here comes a horse that knows where you're going when you leave home too...

http://www.teslarati.com/teslas-full-self-driving-capability-arrive-3-mo...

smule1720 | 24. Januar 2017

just want to stymie, not castrate (leaf/pinto)...

smule1720 | 02. März 2017

.

Coastal Cruiser. | 02. März 2017

"For years I wondered why the Ford LTD wasn't just called the 'Limited' instead. Apparently it didn't stand for anything at all, they just liked the way those letters sounded together"

Yeah, like "Corinthian" leather.

dsvick | 02. März 2017

"Yeah, like "Corinthian" leather."

They just liked the way Ricardo Montalban said it. He could have said "I request nothing beyond the thickly cushioned luxury of seats available even in soft crushed sea shells and coke bottles." and people still would have bought it.

brando | 07. März 2017

https://en.wikipedia. org/wiki/List_of_countries_by_traffic-related_death_rate

Sadly, I suspect auto deaths are so high in US from lack of training. Also kid start driving too young (25 years ago, most in Europe didn't start driving until in their 20s often about 25 before owning first car).

smule1720 | 23. März 2017

NOt sure what a stock analyst knows about car safety:

http://www.marketwatch.com/story/the-real-surprise-about-the-tesla-model...

I guess this is good news, especially on the insurance front...just saw an article that says more people in the US die from horse tranquilizers, than auto deaths, each year...interesting, when will we see this car?!?!?!?!?!

smule1720 | 23. März 2017

Excuse me...elephant tranquilizer, my bad...

smule1720 | 22. Juni 2018

Looks like they've addressed it, this is awesome:

https://www.engadget.com/2018/06/21/tesla-speed-limit-mode/