Model S

Model S and X will soon get the same keyless smartphone entry that the Model 3 has

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Comments

  • SOSO
    edited November -1
    1. This Bluetooth option should work better than the app because Bluetooth doesn’t require internet connectivity to the car through the servers.

    2. One time I parked close to a high powered transmission antenna and my fob wouldn’t work. Fortunately the app did.
  • SOSO
    edited May 2018
    @Tropopause - get a dashcam.
  • edited May 2018
    @Ketchups
    If my (possibly) “soon” to come Model S phone key (which communicates via Bluetooth—I’d know, because I own a Model 3 too) doesn’t work, my backup would be to use the app to unlock the car via internet connectivity. If my phone key doesn’t work AND the car is parked somewhere without internet connectivity, then calling Tesla wouldn’t add any extra functionality.

    My point was that the phone key Bluetooth feature, which BTW has worked perfectly for me on the Model 3 with my iPhone X and my wife’s iPhone 7 Plus, didn’t work for some reason, I’d use my Model 3’s keycard (which you tap against the B pillar) to unlock the car. If Bluetooth phone key is added to my Model S, and if it fails, my “failsafe” would have to be my keyfob, since there’s no B pillar RFID sensor in my 2014 Model S.
  • edited May 2018
    @tropopause that sucks dude! I second @SO and say get a dashcam! I have the blackvue750s and absolutely love it! I installed it as a 4ch system, so I have 4 cameras and it's been great. So far I've been able to use it once, successfully, for insurance reimbursement.
  • edited May 2018
    I wonder if it could be made to work with an Apple Watch 3?
  • edited November -1
    I said 6 months ago that the Model S & X would soon have availability to use their phones as keyfobs, similar to the Model 3. So no surprise.
  • edited May 2018
    From what I saw on Youtube, the BlueTooth antennas are in both side mirrors. A Model 3 owner discovered this when he damaged his passenger side mirror. So for phone keys to work, S and X will need these new mirrors. Yes there will most likely be no key fob in the near future. The key card is much cheaper to make. I am happy either way. However "Now You Know" on YouTube says the phone key on Android is not reliable. They are not happy. They feel they have to use key card to often.
  • edited May 2018
    Elon said "All X & S will soon work with no key if your phone pairs w Bluetooth, signal strength is high & you enable feature" All = All - I don't interpret that to mean Some.

    But that would pale in comparison to the dashcam feature activation Elon confirmed on Aug 30, 2017. As far as I know, this would be the only OEM version of the feature to come with a car. That's a major benefit in so many respects: No worry that thieves break in and steal the expensive standalone dashcam cameras, the video will most likely be stored in the car's computer or cloud rather than a removable SD card, it's free, Tesla maintained, increases the value of the car, provides added peace of mind, could possibly be linked with smartphone notification when away from car under certain driver selected conditions, etc. etc.
  • edited May 2018
    This tweet:



    Says this:

    "This will work on entire S & X fleet, even first production units. Cool thing about software upgrades is that we can keep making your car better long after you bought it."


    Which to me means every Model S and X. Remember all that needs to happen is that the phone needs to be near the car. The antenna will pick up a phone that is nearby the car even if it is not in the car.

    Works for me!
  • edited November -1
    On the iPhone, Siri can unlock your doors, and with hands free Siri, you don't have to do anything but say "hey Siri, unlock my car". Works for me.
  • edited November -1
    @Wprather - the “Hey Siri” approach only works if both phone and car have cellular connection which can be a problem in a lot of underground parking garages. That’s the beauty of the Bluetooth approach; only need connection between phone and car. Cell towers or Tesla server can be down and in theory still works.
  • edited May 2018
    I will not travel without my FOB just as no Model 3 owner should travel without their key card. You may not need a cell signal to get into your car, but you do need a working phone. Your battery dies on you and you are hosed. Can’t call Tesla, can’t use the app to get into/start the car, can’t call a “life line” to unlock the car for you, etc.
  • edited May 2018
    +1 @jordanrichard
    That was my take on the situation as well. Unless there’s a keycard option with the Model S too, doing without the fob as a backup plan would be risky.
  • edited May 2018
    What phones are people using where they have to worry about their battery dying all the time?
  • edited May 2018
    Trop, sorry to hear about your car. The guy that uses a Tesla charger for his personal parked ng spot got his quarter panel kicked in. We're not sure if a hater did I or a Tesla owner that lost his temper after seeing his car at the spot every day.

    Get a dash cam, they are very easy to install
  • edited November -1
    There’s no reason why it’s shouldn’t work on all existing cars. I can play music via BT from my phone to my car when I’m in the house and the car is locked in the garage.
  • edited May 2018
    +1TranzNDance
    I can't remember the last time my phone battery died since my Motorola Nextel phone. That's a throwback. In any case I welcome the Bluetooth enable feature and I will use it once available.
  • edited May 2018
    I do have clients who run their cell phone battery down to zero quite often throughout the day.
  • edited May 2018
    What's the point?

    Model S and X owners would have to carry the fob as backup anyway.
  • edited May 2018
    The point is that with the current app options, you risk being locked out if you park where there's no cell signal, in an underground lot, etc. With Bluetooth, you should (in theory) be able to use the app even when there's no coverage. In practice, it's possible for Tesla's servers to go down and sometimes the app logs itself out for no reason. So unless Tesla figures out how to fix that, there's still a hole in this that goes beyond a person's ability to overcome by keeping the phone charged.

    The chances of the app getting logged out just before Tesla's servers have a problem may be slim, but the chances of a fob battery going dead without plenty of warning is much slimmer.

    In general, it's at least feasible for a person to be able to use the phone as a primary source as long as the person makes sure not to let the phone run dead. The phone could go dead or get misplaced or lost. A fob could get misplaced. A dead phone battery might be more common among the problems that are the fault of the owner, but if I know that I need to rely on the phone battery, I'd turn off the phone before it got so low as to be a risk, and then plug the phone in once I got in the car.

    Another risk with the current app and method of using it instead of a fob is that the phone can be locked in the car by accident. When it's being used as a fob, that changes it to the risk of the phone being left in the car by accident with the doors unlocked. Assuming that's relatively rare and that strangers don't tend to go up to presumably locked cars very often to check to see if they are unlocked, in a rare case where a person forgets the phone, at least the person won't be locked out. It will also address cases where a person steps out for a moment such as to add air to a tire when the person might not think of getting the phone out of the car, since that would typically be done when the person parks and is going to leave the car.

    Obviously a fob can't be used as a backup because it would connect to the car each time, making the phone app irrelevant as a fob.

    Plus for now there's the issue of the phone working as a fob for the currently selected vehicle only. If it stays that way, it's not hands free for anybody with more than one Tesla.
  • edited November -1
    I agree that I likely would not every leave my fob at home, so one could argue what’s the point. I do wonder if someone relying upon the phone Bluetooth approach might be a potential way to minimize the growing number of people using key repeaters to intercept the signals between the car and the fob as a way to steal a vehicle.

    I am NOT an expert on Bluetooth authentication/handshake protocols, but that might potentially be one potential advantage to the phone Bluetooth approach.
  • edited May 2018
    I'm more likely to have my phone/watch with me than my fob, so it would be useful when I don't want to grab the fob just to get into my car when I'm home. I can unlock with my phone/watch through apps but they take longer than the Bluetooth would presumably take.

    There are times, like going to the beach, where I want to minimize things that I carry with me. It would be nice if I could leave my phone, but then I want to take photos so I want to take my phone with me. The fob would be a good candidate to leave behind since it is less useful than a phone.
  • edited November -1
    I think the only reason the Model S and X are getting a phone key option is because Model 3 has it, not because Model S/X need it (they don't). Model 3, on the other hand, does need it.

    I'm glad Tesla is adding the feature for those that want it. I'll stick with the key fob. On thing I don't like about the Bluetooth key is that you can be 30 feet from the car and still be in range, so if you rely on walk-away locking the car might not lock if you park nearby.
  • edited May 2018
    Our M3 android phone works with the car like the FOB. When we first got it the bluetooth would not connect but putting it in airplane mode and off reconnected it. It works great but I do carry the credit card FOB just in case. We also charge the phone in the car console. I really like the credit card FOB.
    The MS FOB is bulky and the phone can be used to start the car also and now it has added some features like remote open/close the trunk. Some very cool new stuff.
    More features the better and each depends on the person's preference.
    In the future I think FSD for Tesla sharing will require a transfer of some type to the client renting the car.
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