Model 3

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Would you 'root' a Tesla to get Android Auto support?

edited November -1 in Model 3
As we all know, Tesla runs a version of Linux on both the entertainment computer and the drive control MCU. The Model S and X have been 'rooted' ( i.e. superuser access, which allows modifications to the operating system and software ) for a while now... both the Tegra ARM based one, and the new Intel based systems.

On the Model 3, with only the center display, all the functions of the Tesla are basically run through a single program. It's one big "app", that acts partially like a window management system, and partially as a fully integrated control system.

Because of the way the software is architected, it -may- be possible to run a program and integrate it into the console software. Kind of like installing a 'rooted' app into an Android phone. Because it's Linux, it should be possible to integrate Android Auto into the software load.

( As it turns out, the Model 3, the Model X, and the Model S all actually run pretty much the same software -- just with different features enabled. Some features are hidden in the 3, like the browser... but the software is still hiding in there, and could be activated by changing a configuration. Some people have managed to accidentally activate some of the S features in the 3 while playing around with the interface.... )

So -- knowing that it might cause Telsa to raise their eyebrows, or not update your car automatically -- would you risk 'rooting' your car to unlock some of the undocumented potential in your car?

Comments

  • edited June 2018
    No and not going to happen.
  • edited June 2018
    Hell no. Not even for CarPlay.
  • edited June 2018
    I would root it without a doubt.
    Root would not disable the update features but you could potentially lose root due to the update. So unless you have a hardware exploit that cannot be patched then I would just play cat and mouse each update in order to have the freedom to do what I want with the vehicle.
  • edited June 2018
    As long as you could easily reflash the stock OS in case something went south, I'd do it in a minute. Just another toy as far as I'm concerned.
  • edited June 2018
    My inner geek is really torn......
  • edited June 2018
    In Australian lingo, if something is “rooted” it is totally stuffed, buggered, no good, ruined. Seems apt :)

    And rooting is not something you do in public here, just warning ya all.
  • edited June 2018
    For Android Auto? NO. To get VLC Media Player or KODI installed? Sure.
  • edited June 2018
    I'd like to get browser support like in the S and X. The software should already be there but there's just no way to access it yet. Maybe with root it could be manually launched?
  • edited June 2018
    "Would you 'root' a Tesla to get Android Auto support?"

    Let me get back to you. I'm still trying to figure out if I'd walk a mile for a Camel.
  • edited June 2018
    I would root my Tesla for a Klondike bar.
  • edited June 2018
    this is by far the biggest drawback of leaving my old vehicle. using a pioneer appradio it would mirror my phone's screen exactly so i could do anything on the radio that my phone would do
  • edited June 2018
    Maybe? I've had custom ECU software on my Evo for a while, I wouldn't be opposed to rooting my Tesla either. I'm pretty lazy though, so it would depend how much work was involved.
  • edited June 2018
    Not only No, but Hell No!

    Rooting bypasses several security protections and you don’t know what interactions a misbehaving app will have on Tesla’s apps. Furthermore, doing so likely voids your car’s warranty.

    Until such time (if ever) that Tesla opens an API for apps to run fully sandboxed, please leave your Tesla a car—don’t try to turn it into the world’s most expensive app platform.
  • edited June 2018
    If you "rooted" the system and then got involved in an accident I would expect that you would end up at fault no matter what. No way on earth I would even ride in a "rooted" Tesla.
  • edited June 2018
    Agreed with the above -- given the computer is so heavily involved with the driving systems, I would never muck with yet for my safety, the safety of others and liability issues.

    That being said, I would love to see Android Auto integrated. However, Tesla has 0.0 incentive to do so as long as they are in an environment where demand so outweighs supply. Maybe in a few years when there's competition.
  • edited June 2018
    Not a flippin' chance! That's an open invitation for some yahoo script-kiddie in their mom's basement to mess with your car.
  • edited June 2018
    I would not. I have not rooted my android cell phone yet.

    And I write code for a living. I love writing code. But... I am not going write code unless someone pays me to do it. And after a hard day at work messing with code, I am not looking at "segmentation fault. core dumped" in my spare time.
  • edited June 2018
    If something goes wrong during the root, that would be an expensive “Brick”. Don’t do it.
  • edited June 2018
    Sure.. if someone gives me a free Model 3!
  • edited June 2018
    Whaddya think the yoyos at teslafi did? Come on Ravshankar, they did it, you can DO it. YeeHawww
  • edited June 2018
    Absolutely NOT!

    I'm an engineer, a "tinkerer," even a bit of what the kids these days call a "hacker" (though I hate that term because of its negative and even criminal associations). But I'm also smart enough to recognize two attributes of my car:

    First, it's mission critical.

    Second, it's life-safety critical.

    If you tamper with the software in such a software-intensive, all-but-software-defined car, you jeopardize your insurance coverage. The insurance company may deny any claim on the grounds that you recklessly modified the car.

    You also jeopardize any grounds you may have for a lawsuit (which is another reason why your insurance company may not like you very much since you also undermine any position they may have to recover their losses).

    It's also potentially illegal. This is an unclear area. The Tesla is a car like none before it. But, in general, it is illegal to tamper with safety- or emissions-critical equipment on a car. Obviously, there's nothing emissions-critical on a Tesla (I found the emissions compliance label on the lip of the trunk lid amusing.) But safety-critical is another matter. You may say, "But I'm not going to -- wouldn't dare to -- touch any of that." But can you be sure that a jury of 12 ordinary people will be convinced beyond a reasonable doubt that there's no way your changes affected anything safety-critical?

    No. It's not wise to tamper with some things.
  • edited June 2018
    I desperately, desperately want CarPlay (even more now that it will support Waze in iOS 12!). But no. Even I wouldn't do this.
  • edited June 2018
    Somehow, amateurs tinkering with the smarts of a 4,000 lb rolling computer seems ill advised.
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