Model 3

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2018.21.9 is BIG update to autopilot

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Comments

  • edited June 2018
    Haggy,
    I don't entirely agree with you. Although it is true that it is the TACC that appears to have failed in the incidents you mentioned, I think it is the autosteer that led to the crash of the model X. I have put ~600 miles of EAP usage on my car in the last 10 days. It has been flawless with one glaring exception. It doesn't know what to do when a lane splits in two. I have learned to always take control when this situation arises.

    Aside from that, I agree. I do not have to touch the "gas pedal" periodically to prove I am paying attention to the the TACC. Yet I have to constantly argue with the autosteer or else it nags at me. It is annoying. The autosteer works very well. In order for it not to nag, I have to tug on the wheel effectively telling it to drive incorrectly in order for it to stop the nag. If I agree to much, it nags. If I disagree too much it just surrenders control and I find myself in control of a car that I have now accidentally pulled out of the center of the lane. There has to be a better way!

    Either the autosteer has to be in control or I am. The only time I touch the brakes or the "gas" is when I want control. The only time I should be tugging against the autosteer is when I want control.
  • edited June 2018
    djharrington | June 11, 2018 "3) relaxation and comfort on trips (with head on headrest I arrive less tired and with no neck soreness compared to pre-AP)"

    What is it that prevents you from relaxing with head on headrest without AP?
  • edited June 2018
    "I think it is the autosteer that led to the crash of the model X."

    It was, but fanbois insist that drivers must babysit autopilot and therefore software inadequacies like this are effectively given a free-pass.
  • edited June 2018
    @mos Perhaps you mean - FUDsters insist that drivers are incapable of understanding that the driver is always in ultimate control and is responsible for the vehicle's driving and therefore FUDsters inadequacies are effectively repeated ad-nauseum.
  • edited June 2018
    @phil: “What is it that prevents you from relaxing with head on headrest without AP?”

    I’ll get sleepy if I rest my head while I’m actively controlling the car, so I don’t do this. It seems counter-initiative that being relaxed while I “babysit” AP keeps me more refreshed and not falling asleep, but it is what it is (for me).
  • JADJAD
    edited June 2018
    I don't understand why so many people spend so much time on the Forum explaining how bad autopilot is. If they don't like it, don't buy it, don't use it, it is not a required part of the car. I like it and use it all the time but the car is amazing either way.
  • edited November -1
    @mos6507. When you do not have autosteer, you need to pay attention to all your driving. Autosteer is clearly beta and does have it's flaws. So you still need to pay attention but can let autosteer take over most of the steering functions under your supervision. For the record. Do you have a Tesla or just an opinion?
  • edited June 2018
    TexasBob wins for the funniest and best argument for why the name Autopilot is ok.
  • edited June 2018
    "TexasBob wins for the funniest and best argument for why the name Autopilot is ok."

    And to extend what TexasBob said, AP maintains direction and altitude. And if left unmonitored it will fly the plane into a mountain or another plane, just like AP in a Tesla if left unmonitored will drive into a barrier or a truck.

    The AP systems in both a plane and a Tesla are of roughly the same capability, in fact the Tesla system is a bit MORE sophisticated and will avoid some of the obstacles some of the time.
  • edited June 2018
    I don't think it is "effectively given a free-pass," everyone knows it must be fixed. However, it is hard to protest Tesla when the driver (who I knew personally), did not follow the operating instructions which is really dangerous. I am not sure why keeping your hands on the wheel and paying attention to the road is considered babysitting.
  • edited June 2018
    djharrington | June 11, 2018 "I’ll get sleepy if I rest my head while I’m actively controlling the car, so I don’t do this. It seems counter-initiative that being relaxed while I “babysit” AP keeps me more refreshed and not falling asleep, but it is what it is (for me)."

    Thanks, dj. Yes, it is counterintuitive, but if it helps you that's great.
  • edited June 2018
    Have you noticed the new display actually DOES show when cars are in your blind spot? Not all the time, mind you, but I have a few pictures where it shows this actually working.
  • edited June 2018
    SCCRENDO, I'm with you! I have same experience -- an offer to park in the left turn lane at a stoplight but never next to an actual parking space flanked by two cars. The feature is useless.
  • edited June 2018
    "Maybe some of you need to beef up your forearms or something (do some naked ice climbing!), but I cruise in AP with either my right or left hand at 5 or 7 o’clock and my elbow on the armrest. "

    Maybe that will work, but I shouldn't have to go to the gym three times a week in order to be able to use a car when I paid as much for it as anybody else. Even when I did work out three times a week, my forearms didn't get beefy. I might have problems doing 20 pull ups nonstop these days, but I'm sure I can do far more than most people, and I still have the problem.

    "I think it is the autosteer that led to the crash of the model X."

    Autosteer needs proper lane markings. It was clear that there was a problem with the lane markings. It's absurd to say that it was autosteer because that implies that it wouldn't have happened without it. Yet we know for certain that it happened to somebody without autosteer less than a week earlier in the same spot. My wife wasn't surprised when it happened because she saw people swerve in that area many times each week, when they realize that the line wasn't really a lane line.

    The real problem seems to be that people are using a minimum following distance, and have the same nag interval as any other following distance. I could see if Tesla gave a following distance of one a nag every 10 seconds, but they don't. If you are following somebody closely, not paying attention, and the person ahead swerves at the last moment to avoid an accident, then don't expect autopilot to save you.

    People need to pay attention, and that includes taking over the steering when the lane markings aren't clear. People need to look for that constantly. In the case of the Model X, the driver even acknowledged that he knew there was a problem in that area.
  • edited June 2018
    Haggy, well said.
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