Model 3

Any chance AM Radio will ever be added to the Model 3?

Waiting for my AWD and wondering is there a technical reason why there is no Am radio or is it just an assumption that its not important for Tesla owners to have. I'm a big sports fan, I'm sure there are plenty FM simulcast, online, apps and streaming options. None of those appeal to me more than just turning the radio on and selecting the station. Obviously this wouldn't prevent me from buying this car and it might seem inconsequential to most but its actually a big deal to me.
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Comments

  • edited July 2018
    Probably not.
    I was upset about it for a while.
    I am over it now.

    Most games can be live streamed now which, for me, is even better since I will now be able to listen to my favorite sports broadcasters, while driving.
  • edited July 2018
    I'm a little disappointed too. When you travel on the interstates, traffic and emergency warnings are broadcast over the AM radio...
  • edited November -1
    @marinergreg: No. Tech reason is likely the electronics in the car produce so much interference that AM sounds terrible.
  • edited July 2018
    I'm going to add an AM radio to my Model 3 by purchasing a portable one, preset it to wsdot Highway Advisory Radio frequencies, and stashing it in the console. I'm not counting on Tesla adding one. A variation on that approach might work for you.
  • edited July 2018
    I can't believe I didn't think of the reception interference from the car. How well does the FM work?
  • edited July 2018
    @marinergreg: "I can't believe I didn't think of the reception interference from the car. How well does the FM work?"
    FM sounds fine to me. Especially when it pulls in HD stations
  • edited July 2018
    Model S/X have AM radio. Maybe the 3 will get it too.
  • edited July 2018
    If you haven't check TuneIn for the AM stations you listen to. All the local stations I listen to here in the Chicago area are on TuneIn. I don't have my Model 3 yet but I use TuneIn on my phone.
  • edited July 2018
    I am still just a bit bummed by no Android Auto. I am sure that one day I will look back and laugh at myself.....but for now I want it. Probably won't get it.

    But sitting in the M3 on Tuesday in the Tesla store, the navigation screen looked so much better than the Google nav screen on my Android Auto head unit 5" screen that it wont be long after taking delivery that the laughing will start....
  • edited July 2018
    snowball, look around ya. see all that fire and brimstone? snowball? snowball? where'd the hell you go, snowball?
  • edited July 2018
    EVRider | July 12, 2018
    Model S/X have AM radio. Maybe the 3 will get it too.

    Um, X never had AM radio (but did have XM option). Now, the S no longer has AM, either. (But XM option).

    After a 3,500 mile road trip passing multiple signs "Tune to AM xxxx for information...", I'm totally lost as to why Tesla omitted AM, but clearly the intent was to eliminate it from all their contemporary vehicles.

    TuneIn and Slacker work okay, if 1-5 minute interruptions and not having either of these in cellular deserts don't bother you. But at least an XM option would cover those eventualities and also provide a way to listen to MLB and other sports that are NOT rebroadcast on TuneIn.

    So, Tesla, throw us a bone: XM option for the "premium audio" like in the S/X.
  • edited July 2018
    AM essential in outback Australia and much of Europe where internet coverage is non-existent and FM limited to local town stations.
  • edited December 2018
    It's my 3rd day and I'm shocked by this admission which I found out yesterday. I'll look into Streaming. To the decision makers at Tesla, please correct this major blunder.
  • edited December 2018
    I haven’t used AM radio in 35+ years, since I was a kid. I knew some coworkers that used it for talk radio shows, but nobody I know uses it. I guess now I know it is still a thing in some regions.
  • edited December 2018
    Just put it on Tune in.. it should work through that app
  • edited December 2018
    check your local listing to see, most AM radio stations are broadcast on an FM HD2 channel
  • edited December 2018
    Here is an article about EVs and AM radio. The electromagnetic frequencies generated by the vehicles’ electric-powered motors occupy the same wavelength as AM radio signals.

    https://incompliancemag.com/will-electric-cars-make-am-radio-obsolete/
  • AM radio works just fine in our Model S
  • edited December 2018
    There are some AM stations available on the Radio.com app. You could install the app on your phone and stream via Bluetooth. Not a perfect solution as cellular reception can be spotty and not all stations are available on the app. Just thought this might help.
  • edited December 2018
    @leo33

    Driving through Kansas around Thanksgiving, the road status stations were all FM. And all useless.
  • Unfortunately, clearly the folks at Tesla don't understand what AM radio is. After all, the icon is a quarter note for music. AM radio isn't very good for music. Its for broadcast communications, something that it does very well. The low frequencies propagate very well, making it very useful in rural areas a long way from transmitters. The low frequencies, however, also mean that there isn't much bandwidth to carry high quality audio such as music.
    If you see dark clouds and you're in a remote area, tuning to AM can tell you about tornado alerts when there is nothing else around. Again, it isn't beautiful and melodious but, if it is news or broadcast information you need, its available pretty much everywhere, unlike FM radio and cellular coverage.
    Additionally, because of the low frequency, a long antenna is needed to receive it. Antenna performance is best when the antenna is about 1/4 of the wavelength. Remember that wavelength = C / F (C = speed of light, F = frequency) so lower frequencies have longer wavelengths. Designers don't like these long antennas because they can dominate the lines of the car.
    Urbanites wouldn't understand.
    Unfortunately, as many have pointed out, the motor and power electronics switching frequencies are very close to the AM frequencies, and, because it is Amplitude Modulated, switching electronics noise at these frequencies wreaks havoc with AM radio. Even ICE vehicle have this problem. Car manufacturers have to work very hard to combat this. It seems that Tesla has weighed the cost and benefits of supporting AM and decided it isn't worth it though.
    to @leo33,
    Let us know how that portable AM radio works for you. I'll predict it is very static noisy.
  • edited December 2018
    Y'know.. I play an EMI/EMC expert on a regular basis, right down to using spectrum analyzers, signal generators, and EMC chambers and, yes, I know and live by Maxwell's equations.
    Point #1: I own a Prius. It's got a pair of serious electric motors in it. In fact, for those of you who don't know, a Prius doesn't move unless those motors are generating/sinking serious current, and there's a large amount of switching of heavy currents at frequencies in the 1 MHz range and down to make the car go.
    Point #2: If one looks into engine compartment in one of these things, there are Big High-Voltage Wires going in and out of the inverter/motor assembly. And they're covered in a loose metal braid. It ain't coax, that's for sure.
    Point #3: The Prius comes with an AM radio. Speaking as a Ham Radio type, it's as hashy as most AM radios tend to be, what with the usual noise from the environment and the ionosphere. (The lower in frequency one goes, the more noise there is. And you wouldn't believe the good stuff one hears down at 9 kHz: Lightning strikes from around the world doing a cool chirp noise as the signals bounce around the earth, multiple times.)
    Point #4: Switching noise is fun, but the high-energy stuff tends to be inside large hunks of metal which, as a rule, do a superb job at keeping the EMI inside, rather than outside.
    Point #5: The FCC in its (past) wisdom has This Thing about $RANDOM objects causing interference. In effect, Class B equipment (which is durn near everything) is supposed to be designed _not_ to interfere with commercial radio and/or TV interests. And if it does, the FCC's got these cars with more radio equipment than a normal person can count and They Will Come And Get The Idiot Who's Blowing Away WABC And Take All Their RF Equipment Away From Them. If a manufacturer thinks, for example, that they can make equipment that blows away TV channel 6, they'll get disabused of that notion _really_ fast. So.. I rather doubt that Teslas make that much EMI; and, if they do, they may get a visit from the FCC, sooner rather than later.
    Point #6: If stuff can leak out, it works both ways: Stuff can leak back in. And what this means is that if one has a car that leaks RF energy and one is driving up Intermod Alley on Rt 95 outside of Boston, and the motor suddenly stops running or throws an error, That Would Be Bad. Back in the 70's when electronically controlled cars first hit the scene there were German cars that would hit their brakes without human involvement up on Intermod Alley. And, yes, that got fixed in a Big hurry. (Not to mention the English Tornado fighter that fell out of the sky over London due to similar issues, resulting in the European Fighter Aircraft standards for electronics immunity.) And, in fact, on the Prius Toyota is Very Proud that their car can withstand 1 kW RF on all the ham radio frequencies at 160 m, 80 m, 40 m, 15 m, 10 m, 2 m, and 3/4 m (if memory serves). 160 m is around 1.8 MHz or so, just above the AM band.
    Conclusion: I'll bet a nickel that, while there may be some hash in and around the car, it won't be much, and it wouldn't be enough to stop an AM receiver from working, especially within an urban zone and particularly at night, when the skip signals come in at high levels. I suspect the lack of an AM radio has more to do with Tesla cost-cutting and the ugly faces millennials get when faced with non-high fidelity sound.
  • edited December 2018
    AM in my Model S broadcasts the sound of the RWD motor. Kinda cool the first couple of times.
  • edited December 2018
    AM and FM radio are relics of the past. Any and all information can be had via the internet. While internet coverage may not be all encompassing yet, I believe that full global internet coverage is inevitably going to happen and most likely by the same fellow who makes these cars. We are just in a transition period which is inconvenient to those who have enjoyed these services for their entire life. I'm one of those that are inconvenienced but I also have boxes of 8 track tapes, cassette tapes and CD's that are useless and I am no longer mad at that fact.
  • edited December 2018
    Wow, learned far more about AM radio than I ever expected just reading this thread. Thanks to all the engineering types for sharing their knowledge in sort of understandable fashion for us non-engineers.

    That said, my Model 3 doesn’t have AM as we all know. But my 2012 LEAF does and it works very, very well, at least as good as any other AM radio I’ve owned. Do I miss it in the Model 3? Yes, but I’ve not found the lack of AM to be a major downside, but just one of those things it would be nice to have, like, oh say, 450-mile range.
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