General

VW could build up to 50 million electric cars

edited November -1 in General
FRANKFURT (Reuters) - Volkswagen could build up to 50 million electric cars on its new electric vehicle platform and is looking at expanding its manufacturing footprint in the United States, Chief Executive Herbert Diess told Automotive News.

He said VW could build 50 million electric vehicles globally across its brands, beginning in 2020,...

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-volkswagen-electric-ceo-idUSKCN1NH1BJ
«13

Comments

  • edited November 2018
    Coulda, shoulda, woulda...
  • edited November 2018
    Where would the batteries come from. Mars?
  • edited November -1
    ^^^^^ Exactly!
  • edited November 2018
    Proof is in the pudding. Believe it when you see it. VW, Daimler, etc and comparatively limitless money and manufacturing experience and yet they are still 2 years from actually producing an EV. Daimler literally had a front seat tot he future when they initially invested in Tesla and that was what, 10 years ago and only they are only now coming out with thier own EV.
  • edited November 2018
    yada yada yada. Same crapola.
  • edited November 2018
    The U S can pump as much oil out of the ground as we need. Germany can’t. If there is a war or a block aid that country comes to a standstill. Remedy go electric. VW will do what is right for their people. Country first.
  • edited November 2018
    @up north: "...VW will do what is right for their people. Country first."

    VW, along with all the other German auto manufacturers, will move to EVs because the German government has mandated no ICE sales starting in 2030. Period. No patriotism involved.
  • edited November 2018
    By the time that happens, Musk will be on Mars.
  • edited November 2018
    In Germany the government is the people.
  • edited November 2018
    @up north: "In Germany the government is the people."

    Same as in the US - it's a govenment of, by and for the people in power.
  • edited November 2018
    I hear they also can build a clean diesel that is more smog free than a Prius.
    ;)
    .
  • edited November 2018
    VW has invented a very special diesel engine. Under all test and measurement devices it will appear to be a battery!

    50 million vehicles? In how many years? scratch that, in how many decades? starting from which decade?
  • edited November 2018
    meanwhile Deiss is lobbying to reduce CO2 reduction targets.

    https://insideevs.com/vw-ceo-evs-crash-auto-industry/
  • edited November 2018
    And a monkey could fly out of my but
  • edited November 2018
    Seeing is believing,and saying something is long way from making it happen. Tesla is so far ahead with proven, beautiful cars with batteries that are years ahead of competitors like VW.
  • edited November 2018
    This was a pump and dump by CEO. No worries. He's known to be a huge liar across the board.
  • edited November 2018
    Some of the posters in this forum need to do some research. VW already has a 200 km range electric Golf available for sale. Audi will bring the etron 95 kWh battery electric SVU to North America in the spring/summer of 2019. The etron is priced lower than a Tesla X. Later in the year, Audi will introduce a battery electric sedan that looks like serious competition for the model S. Jaguar is advertising the iPace battery electric SVU on television.

    The European car manufacturers are making their own batteries; large single cell units that take the place of hundreds of the small cells used by Tesla. Go on YouTube and do some searches. You can find videos about their electric vehicles including content shot in the electric vehicle and battery manufacturing plants. Remember that traditional automakers have a century of experience building automobiles so they are just putting a new type of powerplant in their vehicles and not starting from scratch like Tesla.

    I respect and admire what Elon Musk and Tesla have achieved in pioneering battery electric vehicles but serious competition is coming soon. I drove Audis before I got my Tesla and I can say with confidence that Tesla has a long way to go with customer service and delivery. Model 3 deliveries seem to have overwhelmed them. The traditional automakers have the advantage of large, high volume dealer networks that can handle their new electric vehicles. For dealers its just a new model car.

    Tesla has a first to market advantage with the model 3 and an overall advantage with the Supercharger network. Electrify America and Electrify Canada networks, funded by other automakers, will build out over the next few years and offer 150 to 350 kW DC charging. The Supercharger network advantage will go away over time.

    The electric car market is about to get really interesting and competitive.
  • edited November 2018
    Here is the basic research I needed to do to know this was a pump n dump or fake news article...
    In another article they stated they had budgeted $50B for the batteries. They can make 50M cars. That means they believe the batteries will cost about $1k per car. Anyone else think VW is going into the electric toy car business? ;)
  • edited November 2018
    @Roger1, until you can charge on a road trip in 40 minutes or less with these "competitors" (cough!), they are not at all competitive with Tesla.
  • edited November 2018
    @Roger1, All we hear about the competitors is “coming soon”
    It’s not just a new model of a car for dealers, it’s a new model that will disrupt their income from service as BEV cars require much less service than ICE cars.
  • edited November 2018
    "The European car manufacturers are making their own batteries; large single cell units that take the place of hundreds of the small cells used by Tesla."

    Questions: Are the car manufacturers making the batteries (the cells), or are they getting cells from a battery manufacturer and assembling those cells into a battery pack like Tesla is doing? Either way, how do the cells compare to the Panasonic cells that Tesla uses? Is it better to use more smaller cells like Tesla does or fewer larger cells like Nissan does? I don't have the answers, only the questions, but I do note that Nissan stopped making its own cells and sold the operation to a Chinese private investment firm.

    "Remember that traditional automakers have a century of experience building automobiles so they are just putting a new type of powerplant in their vehicles and not starting from scratch like Tesla."

    Yes, but the traditional automakers do not have a century, or even a decade, of making the new type of powerplant and integrating it into their vehicles.

    "I can say with confidence that Tesla has a long way to go with customer service and delivery. Model 3 deliveries seem to have overwhelmed them."

    Agreed, Tesla's customer service is taking a hit and needs attention, but damn isn't it selling a lot of Model 3s!

    "The traditional automakers have the advantage of large, high volume dealer networks that can handle their new electric vehicles. For dealers its just a new model car."

    I wonder if that's an advantage? It seems that some dealers are anxious to sell the new product, others not so much.

    "Tesla has a first to market advantage with the model 3 and an overall advantage with the Supercharger network. Electrify America and Electrify Canada networks, funded by other automakers, will build out over the next few years and offer 150 to 350 kW DC charging. The Supercharger network advantage will go away over time."

    Possibly. The supercharger network will have to keep up with Tesla's sales, and the Electrify America network will need enough non-Tesla sales to keep it going.

    "The electric car market is about to get really interesting and competitive."
    I'm tempted to agree, but when I look at sales figures I wonder how many EVs, how many EVs and ICEVs combined, the competition is going to be able to sell. You mention Audi and Jaguar, for example. Big names, but they don't sell a whole lot of cars as it is - are their EV sales going to take away from Tesla's EV sales or from their own ICEV sales? Probably a little of both, but yes it will be interesting to see if EVs take those niche players to main stream, or if the main stream automakers come to embrace EVs and stay main stream.
  • edited November 2018
    First of all, go on YouTube and search out electric cars. Check out the European manufacturers. There is content produced by the car makers showing what they are doing. Audi announced the etron in August with a flashy production done in San Francisco. There is content from their factories showing the machines producing the batteries. One of my friends saw an etron SUV driving on highway. They are real.

    rxlawdude, these European BEVs are designed to charge at Supercharger speeds. Tesla chargers are usually 115 - 120 kW units. The Electrify networks are 150 - 350 kW units. The non-Tesla companies that run existing EV charger networks will have to get serious with high speed DC charging and deploy more than 1 unit at a site if they want to survive. At some point, and it can't be too far in the future, Tesla will have to offer a CCS plug connection rather than Tesla proprietary for North American vehicles. They don't use their proprietary connector for European vehicles - they have a J1772 style connector and put DC on the pins. Tesla are part of the CCS plug group and will put the CCS connector on their European cars starting with the model 3. European Superchargers will get retrofitted with CCS cables in addition to the J1772 existing cables. Check Wikipedia if you want some information on charging connectors.

    jlhm, you are correct about the loss of maintenance revenue for dealerships but electric cars still require brakes, suspension work, and tires. Their big issue may be finding trained technicians able to handle more complex software and systems. They will probably adapt with higher hourly rates to makeup for less maintenance per vehicle.


    Yodrak, the machine I saw in a video was manufacturing the battery from basic materials. The structure was not an assembly of small cells. The machine was wrapping some type of flat core with layers of material that looked like a plastic film. I think this material formed the anode or cathode of the battery. The completed unit was filled with the lithium-ion electrolyte.

    Electric motors are not complex to construct compared with internal combustion designs. They don't use transmissions either. Mechanically, the electric motor connects to the axle with a reduction gear. That's pretty simple mechanically. The big challenge is battery management and vehicle control software. Overall vehicle efficiency and range depend on getting it right.

    Some of Tesla's problems come from vehicle design and construction that make it more expensive to manufacture. I saw a YouTube video that I think was from Bloomberg news about a Detroit area company that buys vehicles and methodically tests, disassembles and reverse engineers them. This was not a guy in a garage - the whole operation was very professional. I have no doubt that auto companies and big investment firms buy expensive reports from them to understand what's happening. In the video, the company had purchased two model 3s and torn them apart. The video was shot in what appeared to be a client presentation room with parts from the car mounted on stands; some components had been cut with cross sections. They had a battery pack cut open with the cells visible. I have little doubt that any automaker in the electric vehicle space has extensive knowledge about Tesla's vehicles.

    I mentioned that Audi and Jaguar are selling pure battery electric vehicles. Mercedes, BMW and Porsche are right there too. Where I live in Toronto, Canada, high end European brand vehicles are very common as are Asian brand names like Lexus, Infinity and Acura. Tesla seems to be doing well - I usually see at least one whenever I drive somewhere. There are three electric vehicles I have noticed in my neighbourhood - Model 3, Leaf and a Porsche PHEV. On a recent trip to Buffalo, NY, I didn't see a single Tesla on the US side of the border.

    The Europeans are forced by EU regulations to produce and sell zero emission vehicles. The manufacturers are expecting to sell significant numbers of EVs by 2025. VW, one of the world's largest, if not the largest, manufacturer of automobiles announced plans to convert 3 of their German factories to electric vehicle production. VW (Audi, Porsche) is not a niche player. I think VW and others have started their EV programs with high end vehicles because they have high margins. Technology from the Audi and Porsche will end up in the VW very quickly. The Audi Q5, Porsche Cayenne and one of the VW SUVs are all on the same platform.

    I think EV sales will come from the ICE vehicle segment. EVs have very nice driving characteristics - quiet, smooth and quick. If you can put a power connection where you park overnight then you don't need inconvenient trips to the gas station. More fast DC charging infrastructure means you can travel intercity without worrying about range. No more concern about the price of oil going up. If you are concerned about climate change and urban pollution then you are doing the right thing buying an EV. Carbon dioxide emissions from electricity production will keep declining.

    The next generation of electric vehicles will be present in the next two years with some high end cars and SUVs in 2019. Ford, GM and FCA will need some exciting electric vehicles to compete.
  • edited November 2018
    @Roger, so TODAY can I take an etron from Madrid to Amsterdam with only 40 minute fast charges?
  • edited November 2018
    Not yet, based on their service map. They just got started with 23 stations online and 40 under construction with 400 planned for 2020. If you want more, try

    https://ionity.eu/

    You might want to read 'About' which tells you who is behind the network and who is providing sites.
  • edited November 2018
    Most of us are happy that others are finally seeing the light and getting into EVs. Tesla's shipping it's 4 generation product, while most others are still designing their 1st generation product. Some of these new EVs are likely to be good products, while others may be crap. Hard to tell until these automakers shift from showing concepts to actually delivering cars people want, with a charging network that works, and through dealers that actually want to sell them. There are a lot of risks and potential problems that have not been solved yet for these automakers. Can they be solved - sure, but we don't know if they can or will solve them.

    It doesn't help that so many outrageous statements have been made by some of these companies and outright lies. Maybe VW will spend $50 billion on EVs over the next 500 years - who knows? Perhaps VW dealers will want to sell EVs, even though it dramatically reduces service revenue. Perhaps the culture of outright fabrications (dieselgate) will change. I'm not picking so much on VW, but the industry has a lot of catching up to do, and Tesla is still accelerating with new products and delivering real products people want today. Those that try to duplicate 30% of what Tesla did 8 years ago, are unlikely to be all that successful against Tesla.
Sign In or Register to comment.