Model 3

Range in winter really bad - Chicago area

edited November -1 in Model 3
I have charged full (250Miles shows after full charge-limited) and I got 111.7 real Miles Plus 49 - see picture
Is this what everyone is getting in the cold season?
I am in Chicago

https://photos.app.goo.gl/P8VFTe9m1ce1KK4BA
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Comments

  • edited December 2018
    More information please

    - Which variant
    - What tires
    - Do you park in a garage, if not where
    - How do you charge?
    - Are you able to top-off charge before leaving home

    BTW Range drops off in cool and worse in cold, but there are some tricks to improve.

    250 miles implies you have an MR vehicle.
    Can you charge to 80% overnight, then top-off to 90% before leaving home? Ensures batteries support regen from get go. Also preheat car while still plugged in.

    See if you can plug into 120v at work during winter
  • edited December 2018
    I have a LR RWD and I drive about 8 miles one way to work in the city to South side. I've been averaging 350 to 450 last week when it was snowing and cold. This week with it being warmer, it's about 250 to 350. Today was my best 230. I drive 50 percent city and 50 percent LSD. I have about 400 miles.
  • edited December 2018
    Also, I've been playing around with the settings. I found turning off the back vents and putting manual with fan of 2 or 3 at 70 to be comfortable but yet better battery
  • edited December 2018
    I’m averaging ~380 Wh/mi over the last month in Alaska. LR AWD 18” aero, nokian Hakka 9’s. Pretty much all snow/ice, climate auto to 68, pre heat every day before I leave work, stored in a garage heated to 55 (f) every night.
  • edited December 2018
    Short trips in the cold are very inefficient because heater uses huge energy to get hot and then shuts down again instead of running at lower power to maintain temperature on longer trips. If you sit in traffic with heater on it's also using a lot of power to go nowhere. The constant heating your car and then shutting it down is killing your efficiency.
  • edited December 2018
    For example, on a 30 degree morning if I shut down 8 miles from home I'd be well above 300 Wh/mi but my 30 mile commute ends up below a 250 average. A 0.5 mile trip to the store can be over 600 Wh/mi (and maybe more) in the cold, if the heat is running full blast in a cold car.
  • edited December 2018
    You’re only showing 42 kWh of travel when the car can supply 73 kWh. Something’s not right with this picture. Was this over several days?
  • edited December 2018
    The short answer I would give here is maybe. My experience is when it is cold, snowy, and generally stop and go, this type of thing is about what you can expect or at least is what I have seen with AWD and 19’s. I will say, however, I never really paid attention to the mileage my ICE car got in similar circumstances.

    The good news is that when weather is better or out on the highway it should get better. I understand your fear. You want to make sure there is nothing wrong with your car. I have had mine about a month and have the same fears.

    The problem you are going to run into is that people will come on here and just pretend that you are driving with a lead foot or it’s something else that you are doing. Those people are likely in warm climates or just not in the same traffic or topographical circumstances that you are.
  • edited December 2018
    It's strange to see that low of mileage. I have an LR AWD with factory 19in tires. I put my max charge to almost in the middle of the two lines suggested(Charging finishes at 250Miles). My commutes are small 8 to 10 miles a trip. Real miles I get is like above about 140 miles. MY most worry is like Baltfan says, Is there something wrong with my car. Not worried about range anxiety.
  • edited December 2018
    My guess is that new owners expect that the range estimate will last a week and that if one charges ithe car to 300 miles, they should be able to drive a 60 mile round trip to work all week long. Not how it works and all indications are that the OP and others have this misapprehension. Rated range is good for trip planning. Plan to plug in every night or realize that there are many ways for miles to be spent other than driving if it’s not.
  • edited December 2018
    nagesh, the number to evaluate is the wh/m number. At a trip average around 240 you'll realize the estimated miles shown by the battery icon. Less than 240, my travel plus estimated remaining miles adds up to a higher number than the initial estimate for the trip. More than 2401, the miles traveled plus remaining estimate will be less. Lots of things affect the wh/m - rain, wind, displacement of mass on the roadway (water, slush, snow), running of other electrical users in the car (mainly heat), starting a cold weather trip with a cold soaked battery, starting a cold weather trip with a cold interior (more heat running).

    The cold weather part can be mitigated some by parking and charging in an enclosed space, most by using a heated enclosed space. A preheating charge prior to leaving will help warm the battery, and pre-warming the interior while plugged in will help with energy use for heaters.

    If you have a LR battery and a 100% charge is yielding ~260 estimated miles, that probably needs looking into. As Bighorn stated Above, the LR battery has in excess of 70kw available power for driving. You picture shows 42kw used. That agrees with the 372 wh/m figure as well. On a cold windy day 372 wh/m isn't that unusual, especially if there is precip and heater use. A fully charged LR M3 battery should yield nearly 200 miles total range at that wh/m rate.
  • edited December 2018
    @gballant4570 Wait, your numbers may be off. 260 miles out of 310 is 83% efficiency.

    Between 32F and 41F I'm getting 58% efficiency on my LR AWD.

    58% out of 250 is 145. He's probably doing the same than I am.
  • edited December 2018
    garibaldi, my numbers are based on the performance of my Model 3. Its a dual motor LR model. My main concern about the OP's post is that he seemed to state that a 250 estimated mile charge is a "full charge". That is the only abnormality I could find for his car in his post. The rest I would call normal.
  • edited December 2018
    I should have mentioned the 42kw hours left with 49 miles remaining rather than the estimated miles when charge. A "full charge" would yield more than 70kw available for driving. Better to use battery kw than estimated miles .
  • edited December 2018
    "This just in... The weather gets really bad in Chicago!"

    DUH. It's... Chicago.
  • edited December 2018
    Sorry, another screw up..... that would be 42kw spent..... not 42kw left.....
  • edited December 2018
    *Sam as I am.

    @gballant4570 The OP gave this impression on his/hers first post, but later they said:

    "I put my max charge to almost in the middle of the two lines suggested(Charging finishes at 250Miles)"

    I'm not sure which two lines are those, though.
  • edited December 2018
    The ignorance seems to be compounding (not you, gb).

    I wonder what EM has to say.
    https://mobile.twitter.com/elonmusk/status/1068969435732434945
  • edited December 2018
    I'm trying to answer this with more details, but I keep getting access denied. I did the math and he's doing 60% efficiency.
  • edited December 2018
    I think the numbers add up. Let's assume that 250 miles is 80%, or 56 kwh. He used 42 kwh, or 75% of 56 kwh. 75% of 250 miles is 187 miles.

    So, with this charge, he spent about 187 miles for 111 real world miles. This is about 60% efficiency, which is higher than what I'm doing now although I don't do anything to save energy.
  • edited December 2018
    It worked! It didn't like my parenthesis.
  • edited December 2018
    I think the fact that when talking wh/m, a lower number being more efficient and higher number less efficient can confuse. Its the opposite of some other metrics commonly used to talk efficiency. Miles per kw might be more aligned, but to my knowledge we don't have the option of displaying the data that way......
  • edited December 2018
    @bighorn
    In the same Tweet exchange, Elon makes a comment about people in Norway not complaining as much as the Americans about cold weather operations despite a much higher density of Teslas per capita...
  • edited December 2018
    I do, however, be interested about what the Norwegians think about the Model 3 in particular. They don’t have it yet! And my experience is that the MS/MX seem to warm up the battery much faster then the 3. It takes less than 5 minutes to warm up the X versus more than 20 minutes for the 3... (in 40F weather).
  • edited December 2018
    No need for complicated thinking. His efficiency was 372. 236 is rated, so his range should be 63% of rated. 372 would arise either from repeated stops to keep the battery from staying warm or using the heater a lot. Not difficult to add 100 Wh/m with the heat blasting. Simple newby lack of understanding on some front.
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