Model 3

Supercharger price increase means more superchargers in 2019?

edited January 2019 in Model 3
The supercharging costs go up to 31 cents per key in all states. https://www.tesla.com/support/supercharging

I think this was necessary to pay for the upcoming 2019 SC expansion. A pretty steep increase though. What do people think?
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Comments

  • edited January 2019
    Explain.How much and in what state?
  • I see this as a way to subsidize all the owners who live in California, Tesla's major market and where electricity prices are high. Charging at a supercharger in my Commonwealth of Virginia is now almost triple the cost of charging at home. Rate is now $0.34 per kWh supercharging versus $0.12 per kWh at home. I see this as a way to discourage the routine use of superchargers. Over my six months of ownership, I averaged 3.91 miles per kWh. At the new supercharger rate, that's $0.09 a mile. In my previous car, it cost about $0.12 a mile using today's local gas prices. That's getting pretty close.
  • edited January 2019
    Prices haven't changed in FL. Still the same .22 per kWh as it was when I took delivery in August of 2018.
  • edited January 2019
    Non-issue if you do most of your driving locally and charge at home or at work. It's reasonable to pay a premium when traveling to cover Supercharger infrastructure and operating costs. We need a viable Supercharger network and this increase will (hopefully) support expansion and day-to-day operation.
  • edited January 2019
    https://www.tesla.com/support/supercharging

    You can see that Tesla has increased the price quite a lot..... it went from .11c to .14c per minute, and now it is .28c per minute above 60kw. Per KW locations are .31c per kw.

    What that comes out to cost is a steep $22 if you go from 6% to 100% using the per KW pricing. The minute pricing (assuming 30 minutes) is $4.20 (170 miles) and for a full 5%-100% is $15, a good price for a full charge.

    TESLA had to do something to combat the superchargers becoming so full. I think the per minute price right now is Fair, and will pay for the supercharger in a 5 year payback period. I think this current model is sustainable and is the right way to continue.
  • edited January 2019
    This makes me happy that I waited on trading in my unlimited free supercharging. I'll probably keep it, especially since the trend may continue once the shock of this increase wears off.

    I don't think this means more superchargers, OP. The very first supercharger that they installed was the most expensive. They had to pay for the R&D to figure out how they would work and they had to design all the parts and find someone to make the parts for them. As they build out more and more of these, they should become cheaper per unit and so it should cost less per kwh as they expand, not more. If electricity prices went up drastically, then that would make sense, but electricity prices haven't gone up.

    This is more likely either a money grab by Tesla (they have stated they would never use SCs as a way to make money, so hopefully this isn't the case) or its a way to decrease unnecessary use of the superchargers by locals wanting to top up quickly, rather than waiting until they get home. If the price difference is big enough, many people will choose to just charge at home to save money, which will leave the superchargers open for people who are on a long distance trip and have no other option. It would be great if they could just have surge rates like uber. On really busy days, bump the rates up (and display current rates on the car's screen) to encourage locals to use their home chargers and on slow days, just charge whatever Telsa's actual cost is (including SC upkeep, etc). This would make charging costs less predictable, but would keep the superchargers available for people who actually need them and the average cost should be lower than just raising the prices 24/7.
  • edited January 2019
    "Charging at a supercharger in my Commonwealth of Virginia is now almost triple the cost of charging at home. "

    And there you have it.

    I think higher Supercharger rates accomplishes several things
    1. encourages charging at home
    2. funds expansion of Supercharger system - by those who use it
    3. discourages charging to that last 100% at a Supercharger
    4. puts Supercharger system price in line with "for profit" third party systems
    5. makes financial sense for Solar City and Power Wall home installations

    It only makes sense.
  • edited January 2019
    "Where possible, owners are billed per kWh (kilowatt-hour), which is the most fair and simple method. In other areas, we bill for the service per minute."

    So that means, that at .31c per KW, we folks are now paying much more for supercharging then your average car. that comes up to $19 0-80% for 250 miles of WARM weather range.

    It cost me $17 to go that same distance in my Chrysler 200. TESLA, what the hell are you doing? What happened to "Tesla is committed to ensuring that Supercharger will never be a profit center." At .31c per KW, you're making a 100%-300% markup on the price of electricity? On top of ruining the cost effectiveness of taking your car on a road trip...
  • CSTCST
    edited January 2019
    Depends, in CA... Cost of afternoon per can hit 50cents/ kW hr.
    Plus, encouraging charging from home is a good thing.
  • edited January 2019
    TESLA like all companies have to make a profit so I see this as a necessary move by TESLA. There is a new CEO and a new board member that certainly is interested in TESLA making a sustain profit. However some people complain about everything, if the supercharger is too expensive charge at home, at relative or friend's home, better yet don't buy an electric car. In my case I have solar, so I am not going to worry too much if the electrical company's rates are higher in my state. There are all kinds of decisions people can make to, but if you are complaining about TESLA, which is by the way currently an expensive car, you could never afford it, so buy yourself a cheap car. LOVE MY TESLA!!!!
  • edited January 2019
    Anyone complaining about the OTA FREE SOFTWARE UPGRADES??? LOVE MY TESLA!!!
  • edited January 2019
    Nothing has changed in FL. Here is a September 2018 bill as compared to a January 2019 bill.

    St. Augustine, FL Supercharger
    9/3/2018 11:36AM

    Energy
    44 kWh @ $0.22/kWh
    $9.68
    Tax included
    $0.59


    Jacksonville, FL - County Road Supercharger
    1/17/2019 11:40AM

    Energy
    51 kWh @ $0.22/kWh
    $11.22
    Tax included
    $0.68
  • edited January 2019
    Are the electric companies charging Tesla more?
  • My understanding is that Tesla found that most Supercharging, especially urban supercharging is done during the peak hours of the day. Even worse, the Superchargers in my area seem to be busiest in the evening which is, from a solar energy perspective, the absolute worst time since solar production is waning while grid usage is increasing (often called "the duck curve") This is the most expensive electricity. Also, given that Tesla is a business, they will pay commercial rates and, in many places, demand charges for high current draw (above average energy cost).
    As such, I'm not surprised if Tesla is having to increase the costs.
    This shouldn't affect most Tesla owners who either have, or should be looking to find a way to charge at night, when electricity is cheapest, the car is doing nothing anyway so it is not costing their time, and one can charge at slower, more grid-friendly rates.
  • edited January 2019
    At this rate EV open road traveling will decline. The dynamics may change soon, but for now local gas is $2 and my son's 2019 Jetta gets 40 mpg on the road. If EV is going to be close to the same expense and you have less freedom to move about the highway system due to finding charging spots and being concerned about if they are working or full. It is just not a good move. The cost for charging on the highway needs to be kept low to encourage people to use it in spite of the potential anxiety in doing so. I don't use it yet and not sure I would really, especially if there is no real savings. Subsidizing by Federal and Local authorities might be needed to really increase use until the charging system nationwide is mature and can be done cost effectively.
  • edited January 2019
    Local gas here is $3.60
  • edited January 2019
    MT is billed by the minute and it jumped a lot. Gas around here is about $2.75 that makes the Supercharger expensive. Charging at home is way cheaper. I think Tesla is trying to deter people that are not actually travelling from charging at Superchargers, which I can agree with.
  • edited January 2019
    $1.96 in Lexington, KY.
  • edited January 2019
    Looks like nothing appreciably changing for my family. It went from $0.26 to $0.31 per kWh for us. On a recent 1,135 mile trip in my wife's Model 3 we spent $66 on charging and calculated it would have been $135 for gas for her prior Honda CRV. Yes, gas is expensive in California. So this change will still keep it quite a bit cheaper than gas for us. Plus, it is $0.121 / $0.135 (summer / winter rates) per kWh for home charging which makes it one hell of a lot cheaper than gas. Again, CA electric rates are pretty high - many of you get it lower than $0.12 per kWh at home in the evenings in other locations.
  • edited January 2019
    All of California is $0.31? Or is it different at different places that are always busy?
  • edited January 2019
    Many of Tesla owners live in metropolitan areas (including suburbs) and a fair percentage of urban residents live in multi-dwellings (apartments/co-ops/condos) where there is either no charging available or management prohibits private charger installation. [By that I mean "no garage available," "no on-premises charging available."

    The increase to 30-cents/kWh or more in NYState is asking us to pay a disproportionate rate for energy - essentially a penalty for living in congregate housing. If I purchase a private home and increase my cost of living by $15,000/yr in property/school taxes, I can get a rate of 17cents/kWh at home or possibly 7cents/kWh for overnight hours.

    This new rate will make the cost-per-mile about the same as my Prius. Where's the incentive to the mass market to leave ICE if the purchase cost is high and the energy cost is high? Is Tesla now marketing to "garage-owners only?"

    It's not fair either to say the rates are to subsidize infrastructure. I own stock and expect that the corporate budget includes funding sufficient infrastructure to support rolling stock - not asking us to "invest at the charger."
  • edited January 2019
    @wiboater, in my state, Maine, the commercial rates are cheaper than residential. Residential is 14c/kWh. Supercharger rate went from 22c/kWh to 32c/kWh. I suppose if this is to deter users from always charging at superchargers, to lower congestion, then I'm fine with it, but it presumably primarily impacts those who drive Model 3 and recently purchased S and X.
  • edited January 2019
    Many of Tesla owners live in metropolitan areas (including suburbs) and a fair percentage of urban residents live in multi-dwellings (apartments/co-ops/condos) where there is either no charging available or management prohibits private charger installation. [By that I mean "no garage available," "no on-premises charging available."

    The increase to 30-cents/kWh or more in NYState is asking us to pay a disproportionate rate for energy - essentially a penalty for living in congregate housing. If I purchase a private home and increase my cost of living by $15,000/yr in property/school taxes, I can get a rate of 17cents/kWh at home or possibly 7cents/kWh for overnight hours.

    This new rate will make the cost-per-mile about the same as my Prius. Where's the incentive to the mass market to leave ICE if the purchase cost is high and the energy cost is high? Is Tesla now marketing to "garage-owners only?"

    It's not fair either to say the rates are to subsidize infrastructure. I own stock and expect that the corporate budget includes funding sufficient infrastructure to support rolling stock - not asking us to "invest at the charger."
  • edited January 2019
    Sorry for duplicate entry... problem with interface response.
  • edited January 2019
    My initial reaction is this - let's wait and see how this plays out once the new rates have fully taken effect across the US. Sounds like the impact may vary based on US location.

    After doing our last analysis, EV fuel cost/mile with local home charging is free with solar PV and about $0.025/mile if buying power in Florida, vs. about $0.12/mile with an equivalent luxury ICE sedan. This is based on local utility rates of about $0.13/kWh.

    During our last road trip in the Southeast US, for some reason we were only billed for 3 of 12 supercharger stops. While I'm sure that was an aberration, the rate shown on the bills we did receive was $0.22/kWh. Access to quick charging on road trips certainly has great value, so even if Tesla were to raise these supercharger rates by 50% the fuel costs would still be less than a comparable ICE sedan while on the road...

    We're getting ready to duplicate the last trip soon and will do a comparison...
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