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Why Mars? Why not the moon?

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  • edited December 2019
    IDK guys, there have been some good conversations in here and some equally good information shared amongst the contributors.

    I think that we should just keep 'incrementing' the flagging and wait for some moderator to remove all of the BS so that we're left with all of the good aspects of this discussion.
  • edited December 2019
    this was a pretty funny thread
  • edited December 2019
    i liked the part where this thread created the underground cows on mars thread
  • edited December 2019
    :)
  • edited November -1
    MoooOOOooo....
  • edited December 2019
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  • edited December 2019
    mooo again
  • edited December 2019
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  • edited December 2019
    Chemists, scientists, engineers, researchers and others, are considering the rather novel idea of using the Martian soil, combined with 3-D printing, to fabricate housing from materials located on-site to help decrease costs and reduce cargo weight by exploiting a natural Martian resource:

    https://cen.acs.org/articles/96/i1/build-settlements-Mars-ll-need.html
  • edited November -1
    Buildings will go up 6 times faster due to the lesser gravity. :)
  • edited December 2019
    Perhaps, but with Mars' gravity being only about 38% of that on Earth it also means that they'll (the buildings) have less structural integrity as well because of the reduced gravity decreasing or 'lightening' the building material's overall density and so, the eventual structural rigidity of any buildings.
  • edited December 2019
    If we build stuff on Mars the same way we do it on Earth, we should not be multiplanetary.
  • edited December 2019
    But they wont be blown by wind, not like The Flag.
  • edited December 2019
    The 2008-model Roadster was previously used by Musk for commuting to work, and is the only production car in space. The car, mounted on the rocket's second stage, acquired enough velocity to escape Earth's gravity and enter an elliptical heliocentric orbit crossing the orbit of Mars.

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  • edited January 25
    Besides the lowered tensile and structural strength of any building erected on Mars utilizing Mars-based and/or in situ materials, by whatever means, there's also the problem of literally everything on Mars being irradiated well beyond the point of actual usability, that is, unless the plan is to house everyone who goes there in what would basically be microwave ovens, albeit ones in the form of what resembles a housing structure.

    So while a very neat, genius even idea, it's not actually a feasible solution for Mars-based habitation given the ramifications associated with erecting structures made from irradiated Martian soil.
  • edited January 25
    BTW, I can provide more specifics on this if anyone would like....
  • edited November -1
    I don’t believe Martian soil is radio-active although it mat be toxic due to perchlorates. These are toxic to plants and human thyroids. Radiation on Mars is from outer space and gets through because of its thin atmosphere. Establishing a colony there may be challenging but not insurmountable
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martian_soil
  • edited January 26
    Between the loss of its magnetic field and its atmosphere, the surface of Mars is exposed to much higher levels of radiation than Earth. And in addition to regular exposure to cosmic rays and solar wind, it receives occasional lethal blasts that occur with strong solar flares.

    In just getting to Mars, an explorer would be exposed to more than 15 times an annual radiation limit for a worker in a nuclear power plant.

    Solar energetic particles (SEPs) and galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) turn a trip to Mars into a six-month radiation shower. The Mars rover Curiosity has allowed us to finally calculate an average dose over the 180-day journey. It is approximately 300 mSv, the equivalent of 24 CAT scans.

    https://www.space.com/24731-mars-radiation-curiosity-rover.html

    But all of this only addresses surface level radiation while anyone familiar with the properties of radiation knows that radiation doesn't stop at the surface but penetrates into and travels through a variety of materials like soil and rock, for example.

    While the topics of Space travel and planet colonization are great subjects for thought exercises, if we're ever to achieve successful extraplanetary travel we need to turn our focus to what the reality of the prospect is based on the actual facts of the situation that we're aware of from what our scientific experimentation and observation has revealed to us thus far.

    As it stands now Mars is a VERY inhospitable, deadly even, place incapable of supporting life as we know it.

    If we are to go to Mars (or anywhere else off world for that matter) we'll need to not only take everything that we'll need to survive, we'll also have to ensure that it is both sustainable and replenishable by what means we'll necessarily need to bring with us as nothing on Mars will be usable to us.
  • edited January 27
    Thanks for the link. And indeed it states that most of the radiation is from outer space, They are getting a better handle from “Curiosity” as to how much. But not to try get nit picky, it says nothing about the soil being radioactive. Not stay that the soil may be easy to use because there are high levels of toxic perchlorates.
  • edited January 27
    The radiation aspect is something that i've thought about before. Everything on earth is used to what the earth experiences. We would have to make everything equivalent to that of earth. Probably going to need high level radiation shielding between layers of the exterior of the spaceship. On the ground level is another challenge.

    One thing i've thought about is that the circadian rhythm is backwards on mars. That will actually have a huge impact on plants and our sleep cycles.
  • edited January 28
    Fact check @andy
    The Mars day is 25 hours. So not a complete flip but slightly longer days
    We need to protect against radiation. But not necessarily mimic earth.
    https://spaceplace.nasa.gov/days/en/
  • edited January 28
    I meant in the sense of how much radiation hits the surface. If more surface radiation would have an effect on plant growth or not. But the circadian rhythm point was that the light is more red during the day and more blue at night, which is the opposite of earth.
  • edited January 28
    Even though the light is different do you have any data that the color impacts circadian rhythm? Interestingly the one hour time shift each day does take some getting used to.
    https://www.space.com/5668-living-mars-time-scientists-suffer-perpetual-jet-lag.html
  • edited January 28
    I dont have a study on hand right this second, but isnt that the whole deal with smartphone usage before bed, and the reasoning behind having blue light filters on devices that slowly add red color to your screens as sunset approaches?
  • edited January 28
    ill try to look for some studies when i get some time.
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