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Why Mars? Why not the moon?

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  • edited March 2019
    @NKYTA

    The emergence of the field of Quantum Mechanics has thrown the entire world of Physics into a tailspin, causing many a physicist to rethink many concepts/understandings/bits of conventional wisdom that were once held immutable, but then, much of Science as a whole has always been provisional in nature, hence the "theory" aspect of Einstein's "THEORY of Special Relativity".
  • edited March 2019
    @blue, totally agree, but, sorta sure SR does have experimental evidence.

    Tho not sure anyone has reached C, so who could actually make the case that I’m a four hundred pound guy in a basement...about as infinite mass as you get. ;-p
  • edited March 2019
    @NKYTA

    SR defines Mass as 'a property of a physical object' which, apparently, is the result of 'a measure of its resistance to acceleration when a net force is applied' (a measure of its physical 'weight') while relegating the object's gravimetric influence to being merely a byproduct of its Mass as opposed to being an actual contributing/defining attribute.

    That's a mistake which completely undermines Einstein's Theory but, again, this is not the sort of forum for that type of discussion.
  • edited March 2019
    @Mike83

    'Quantum transport' is intricately complicated even as merely a topic of discussion.

    As for Mars, I guess it really depends on whether or not those are traces of actual H2O rivers or some other sort of fluid-like substance, IF traces of river beds at all.
  • edited March 2019
    @Mike83, thank you for the link.

    @Ross1, +1
  • edited May 2019
    A claim that hidden life on Mars does exist and it is still there.


    https://sputniknews.com/science/201905121074932320-mars-nasa-scientists-signs-of-life-underground/
  • edited May 2019
    where there is water, there is life. There is water on mars.
    (my opinion)
  • edited May 2019
    Theres actually an atmosphere on Mars. There is no sustainable life capability on the moon. Moon base is fine, but not for a colony.
  • edited May 2019
    A synopsis of life on Mars. Possibly but more exploration is necessary.

    https://cosmosmagazine.com/space/is-there-life-on-mars-let-s-assess-the-evidence
  • edited May 2019
    @jimgpas. Where there’s water there could be life but it is not a guarantee
  • edited May 2019
    SpaceX is launching a rocket at 11pm EST tonight with a bunch of satellites on it. Hopefully it will be clear and I can see it. I live about 150 miles away but used to live around 40 miles from the launch pad. The entire beach was lit up like daylite when they did the shuttle launches at nite.
  • edited May 2019
    @SCC: Time will tell, thats my opinion.
  • edited May 2019
    @SCC

    Nothing is a guarantee. Its about the best decision. Mars has an atmosphere, so that at least has the potential to allow people to walk outside and breathe without a spacesuit. If neither Mars nor the Moon have water, then life is unsustainable anyway.

    Moon would make a great base due to the low gravity.
  • edited May 2019
    Mars has lots of water ice
  • edited May 2019
    Mars has ice water but no atmosphere I believe. But I will recheck
  • edited May 2019
    Mars absolutely has an atmosphere. Atmospheric presence is most significantly dependent on the planets gravitational strength. Moon does not have an atmosphere, not enough gravity to hold down the gasses.
  • Personally, I vote for Europa (one of Jupiter's planets). It has an atmosphere and liquid water. It's just a bit farther than Mars.
    Mars' atmosphere is mostly CO2 but very thin. Mars surface atmosphere is about the density of the earth's atmosphere at 100,000 ft.
    Nobody will probably be breathing it directly.
    Look for the next NASA/JPL rover to be extracting oxygen from the Mars CO2 atmosphere and for a helicopter to be flying there.
  • edited May 2019
    Probably wont have helicopters and airplanes on mars then.
  • edited May 2019
    Mars atmosphere
    https://www.space.com/16903-mars-atmosphere-climate-weather.html
    It is 95% CO2. But don't tell Mitch. He will tell you that Mars proves that fossil fuels don't cause greenhouse gases because there are no cars on Mars. But we could answer that if CO2 was so good for plants how come there are no plants on Mars
  • edited May 2019
    @Andy work on Martian aircraft including helicopters is already being done.
  • edited May 2019
    Interesting link Darth. Thanks. I wonder how they will get it to fly in that atmosphere
  • edited May 2019
    Physics is physics. They just need to design the blades to push enough “air” to counteract the weight of the aircraft vs Martian gravity. More interesting to me is how advanced the automation needs to be since remotely piloting such a craft over Mars to Earth distances would be a serious challenge.
  • edited May 2019
    Tesla autopilot for helicopters.
    I was curious as to what the blades need to look like to force enough air in that thin atmosphere
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