Model 3

If there's a software upgrade to bring the LR Dual Motor acceleration close as the Performance, I wo

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Comments

  • edited March 2019
    @lbowroom

    The reports of the service flash from AWD to P3D- can just as easily be a P3D- hardware on AWD software, which is then corrected.

    If indeed there are ZERO hardware differences between AWD and P3D-, with the claim from Tesla CEO this is not the case, then this is an $11k class action waiting to happen. Binned would indeed carry same part numbers, and I have yet to see a teardown for a Performance vehicle, only the non-P $49k variants of 2018.

    Again, I'm simply choosing to trust Elon on this one, I could very well be wrong.
  • edited March 2019
    No lawsuit necessary. Software only performance difference isn't illegal. P3D- doesn't exist anymore.
  • edited March 2019
    @amanwithplan I think everyone is thinking clearly. The motors are the same. I have a Dual Motor non P. If I were to purchase a software unlock to make it quicker for say 5K, that's only part of the P version. I would need to get the 20 inch rims, for 4K. Then Get the upgraded breaks and suspension tweaks and track mode. How much would that be? 2K maybe? Seems like 11K, no one should cry if we could just get the "motor unlock". SHEEESH!!
  • edited March 2019
    A lawsuit on Performance model issue does not even remotely compare to the FSD issue. Are you kidding there is no basis period. Nothing tweeted or said for that matter is going to stick. It is all a patern of disinformation.
  • edited March 2019
    As someone who came along when P3D- was no longer available and didn't want the rougher ride of 20 inch wheels or summer tires, it would be nice to pay extra for more acceleration. If you got those same things plus better motors, bigger brakes, and the spoiler for $11k, why would you care if someone paid $6k more for a software upgrade that basically made them P3D- or close to that? It wouldn't affect the value of your car at all. Moreover, your car would handle better and have shorter stopping distances. If you say you would have ordered something other than P3D and then upgraded, you have enjoyed the benefits of P3D and took no risk that the upgrade wouldn't be there.
  • edited March 2019
    hallelujah @Baltfan I think I said the same thing as you!
  • edited March 2019
    Win Win. Whatever the upgrade amount is just rebate me that amount. We are all happy!!

    Maybe at some point, I would get enough money back to match the current discounted pricing. Wow, that would make me really happy. Who could not go for that!
  • edited March 2019
    I'm ready to pay, Tesla I'm waiting for your offer :-)
  • edited March 2019
    There is defiantly money in aftermarket performance, so why can't Tesla if it's as simple as a software unlock?
  • edited March 2019
    So when I was in for tire rotation I asked the service guy about this and here is what he said. In the beginning when they were only making the performance model all the rear motors they had were the performance tested ones. Then when they first started to make the non performance model some of those actually got the performance rear motors since that's all that was in stock. This was to keep production going as fast as possible and then as standard motors came in those were used for the standard models. So he says if you have an early production car it is very likely you have the perf motor later on it's hit of miss. Seems somewhat plausible that something like this is what happen. In any case seems reasonable that even the standard motor can have more power unlocked.
  • edited March 2019
    Historically, and any other way you look at it, what you just said makes no sense.
  • edited March 2019
    @007bond - there's no evidence that the motors changed physically at all. Elon simply said that these were burned in for longer, and selected out of the stock. Burn in, well, I'd think that after a while of driving any Model 3, you'd get that, and as far as selection, probably not much variance.
    Without any hard evidence of a physical difference, I'd think it's simply software
  • edited March 2019
    First world problems.
    I can't use my P3D power longer than a second or two at a time.
    It's the all those other cars on the road slowing me down.
    Can I get a HSV lane?
  • edited March 2019
    questions: I've got a duel motor AWD long range.
    1. are the motors the same size and specs as a RWD motor?
    2. can i assume that the motors will last longer and hold up to stress better than a single RWD motor.
    3. if i occasionally like to floor it to see what it feels like to go 0-90 mph--how bad is that for my motors and battery degradation?
  • edited March 2019
    Some third party will come out with a software hack that will be able to match the performance of the P3D if not exceed the power of the P3D for much less money. Most cars today can be updated with relatively cheap software form third parties. I would expect the same for my AWD, just wait a year or two.
  • edited March 2019
    Count me in, I will pay $$$$ to get a P3D- performance or closer enough, but I will never buy a new P3D with 20" wheels and lower suspension. It is a WIN-WIN situation.
  • edited March 2019
    @lbowroom- you are correct!
    @howard - you are a [email protected]!
  • edited November -1
    For it to work without Performance owners breaking out the pitch forks, Tesla would need to go with the charging more for EAP/FSD after purchase model. Meaning, charging $12k or more for it.

    That way everyone can be satisfied and no one will feel cheated.

    Of course, this is coming from the owner that after 14k miles has yet to take it out of chill...
  • edited March 2019
    @kevin_rf Say it ain't so!!!!

    Just kidding- are you a hyper-miler? My average wh/mile is just over 300 after 12k miles. I've got a stealth P3D
  • edited March 2019
    Would happily pay to get a software upgrade for extra acceleration on my DM. The main reason I didn't opt for the Performance is not wanting lowered suspension or 20" wheels.
  • edited March 2019
    @wfickas

    Good point!

    Also I didn’t realize that Performance model was also Dual Motor! I taught it was like RWD but with high current drive for the motor! Oh boy I really was blind on this one lol I believe I fell in love last year with the LR Dual Motor that I didn’t consider the Performance because I think had only one motor ouppssssssss (only realize this year it had 2 frigging Motors lollllllllllllll) Funny how the brain can trick you sometimes when you already choosen the ONE :-)
  • edited March 2019
    I expect that Elon's statement regarding binning of the P motors is true. I suspect that the vast majority of M3 AWD (non-P) rear motors are capable of a 0-60 time in the range of 3.3 seconds to 4.2 seconds (in conjunction with the front motor of course). I doubt Tesla knows how each of theses motors performed on the dyno (for binning of the P motors) so they would have to pick some number that they could guaranty at about 95% certainty. If that was a 4.0 second 0-60 time (for example, via software unlock) what would it be worth to folks? I'm thinking maybe $2500 for me.
  • edited May 2019
    I'll take a dual motor upgrade option for my RWD thank you very much.
  • edited May 2019
    Here's a really interesting little video on exactly this topic. It does show a drag race performance advantage for the P Model but it looks like on a race track the big advantage of the P would be the "track mode" and not the power output.


  • edited May 2019
    @sparky

    Cool video. Appreciated.
    Makes buying a non-p hurt just a little less....
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