Model 3

Stinky car

145791016

Comments

  • edited July 2019
    Do not forget, I am also on board thinking they may have an elegant software fix but I am not saying there is one, has been one, or is going to be one because of a few anecdotes.
  • edited July 2019
    @M8B,
    That elegant software fix was already done once is what I'm saying - it looks like we somehow lost it over the versions.

    Both of us know that even if they fix this with software (again) Tesla isn't going to come out and put this in the release notes, would you still call it a rumor?
  • edited July 2019
    @vmulla Where is proof that there was a software fix for AC stink (show me the TESLA docs on that).

    Talk and anecdotes are not proof and rumors are lies.
  • edited July 2019
    @Magic 8 Ball,
    Where's the proof that Tesla fixed any specific bug? Be reasonable, no one can prove Tesla fixed anything - but everyone experiences the fixed software. Same here.
  • edited July 2019
    So there you go you have no proof, you are spreading rumor, you are a liar.
  • edited July 2019
    Sounds like someone missed their scheduled diaper changing......
  • edited July 2019
    I'm relying on memory and experience and saying this was already dealt with but has returned.
    You think that what I'm saying amounts to lying (can't help you there)

    Tesla doesn't reveal what it does to fix bugs, or what bugs are fixed - that's just common knowledge. No one can prove or disprove what Tesla fixed and how. That's not a lie, not a rumor.

    Both of us agree that a software fix is possible.

    I'm done here, I want to end on a civil tone.
  • edited July 2019
    Rumors are lies (get a thesaurus). You are making assumptions and fabricating and latching onto stories that are also assumptions. This is the stuff shysters and liars do. Stick with facts and truth.

    To assume that software prevented smell before is just plain ignorance of the variables, including the most important: time.
  • edited July 2019
    Just read the reports from early vin owners here:

    https://teslaownersonline.com/threads/mold-vinegar-smell-from-a-c.9900/

    Seriously, this forum could use a search feature.
  • edited July 2019
    Just put some stinky teenage boys in the back seat and you won’t notice it.
  • edited July 2019
    Aside from the two dickheads hogging the forum, the real answer is twofold. If you have a mold problem, it needs to be cleaned out. Once it has been cleaned out the software/firmware change will prevent it from re-occurring by drying out the evaporator each time you shut the car off. If the problem has not started, the fix will prevent it from starting.
  • edited July 2019
    Thanks Syclone.
  • edited July 2019
    Yes the mold/mildew must be killed. Cleaning out is difficult if it growing on the backside of the condenser as suspected.

    To kill the mildew simply spray in some lysol or other mold killing spray into the air intake found when you open the frunk (no need to disassemble anything unless you want to replace the filters). The spray will kill the mildew then you just have to make sure you don't create conditions it does not grow back. Since no one knows if there is actually software to do this I recommend running the fan with fresh air intake for a few minutes to dry out the system after use if you get the stink (maybe do this at the end of the day). Most people never get this smell because their normal use does not create the conditions is in the deep dark places of the car where mildew grows.

    @Frank99 shared his fix but I would try a simpler approach and just spray the lysol in from the air intake found under the frunk hood. Bottom line if you get stink lysol or similar is your friend.
  • edited July 2019
    If you do decide to replace filters I recommend killing the Mildew first, running the system with old filters for a while, then replacing filters. There is no need to contaminate your brand new filters with spores.
  • edited July 2019
    From my experience, it's not clear that spraying Lysol into the intake will help. It will all get intercepted by the cabin air filters and not make it to the evaporator coil. The vapors may be enough to take out the mold - I'm not an expert on how Lysol affects mold and mildew, whether direct contact is needed or fumes are sufficient. My concern would be the inside of my car smelling like Lysol for the next month. But, hey, if it works for you more power to you. Magic 8 Ball, have you used Lysol on your car?
  • edited July 2019
    @Frank99 Not my TESLA but other cars I owned and many customer cars in the body shop way back when. Good point on spray not making it to the mildew being blocked by filter, I don't think there is harm in trying. If you don't want to try lysol then I see no harm in trying another spray for the purpose like you recommend.

    I really don't care for this guys videos much but his and others show use of lysol.

  • edited July 2019
    BTW, I see replacement filters for sale for the S on ebay but none for 3 yet. How did you get 3 replacement filters? Order online somewhere, order from TESLA by phone, Go to SC, etc.? Inquiring minds................
  • edited July 2019
    I'm having this issue in my car right now. A mobile tech who recently replaced my LTE card recognized the smell immediately, and said to replace the cabin air filter. That has not happened yet.

    After reading all 4 pages of this thread, I still don't know if that is a fix or not. Like some others here I too have noticed that there is not generally a pool of condensate under my car after parking. Have we confirmed that a clogged condensate drain is part of the story here?
  • edited July 2019
    I just took my Model 3 into service for this very issue. My service center has some of the "trainers" in the area, so they're very experienced. Here's what they did (no charge). It's NOT the cabin air filter.

    1) Cleaned out the desiccant bag, and deodorized it. Apparently this is what's absorbing all the smells.
    2) Checked and dusted off the air filter. It did not need replacing.

    They said that the Model 3 is having much more issues with the desiccant bags than the Model S or X had previously. It's a known problem that is more likely to come out when the weather is warmer, but a cleaning of the bags should do the trick.

    Bottom line - don't pay for new air filters. They're most likely NOT the issue. Have the Service Center clean out the desiccant bags. If they don't know about this solution, have them call the service center in Torrance, CA. Theses guys are tops!

    On a separate note, the wait time for service at my service center has gone down considerably. The technician said that they're getting a lot more parts in stock these days, and that mobile service has expanded their skills and can now even do light body work.
  • edited July 2019
    They also recommended running the A/C with outside air coming in every once in a while to clear out the system.
  • edited July 2019
    Good info TinyCricket. Thank you.
  • edited July 2019
    No problem here. I don’t recirculate air. I learned about these years ago.
  • edited July 2019
    I have this smell when my A/C is on as well. Only happens when the car is sitting out in the sun and I turn it on right away. It goes away usually within 20-30 seconds. I usually hold my breath lol until
    It dissipates. I switch up fresh and recycled air regularly.
  • edited July 2019
    Magic8Ball -
    My local Service Center had them in stock, no issue. I figured while I was in there I might as well replace them, and the car's 15 months old. I sniffed the old ones, didn't smell anything on them.

    Neil.Weinstock -
    My opinion is that it's not generally a clogged drain problem. Some cars might be, but mine wasn't clogged.
  • edited July 2019
    @Frank99 Thanks, that is good to here.
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