Model 3

Hockey pucks instead of jack pads

edited November -1 in Model 3
Has anybody actually used hockey pucks instead of Jack pads to raise a Model 3 on lift? Are they pretty nearly the same size? My local Costco is willing to rotate the tires, but they won't do it unless I supply jack pads. I was thinking of getting 4 hockey pucks and leaving them in the Costco service center.
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Comments

  • edited November -1
    People use them. Pads fit into the hole so they won’t shift. Extra care is required.
  • edited May 2019
    I use hockey pucks. They work great.. Someone posted a nice DIY video from YouTube using hockey picks, rubber cylinder and screws to make a nice rig that fits in the hole to prevent shifting. Have used twice so far. They are great.
  • edited November -1
    I used hockey pucks on the frame lift at the auto hobby shop twice. Putting on and taking off my winter tires. Using hockey pucks for unibody vehicles is nothing specific to Tesla it’s been common practice for years.
  • edited May 2019
    Hockey pucks works well, also you can buy 4 aluminum pads for $52
    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07NRD9VLY
  • edited November -1
    I found that, with my PD3+ (lowered factory suspension), my “low profile” jack isn’t low enough to get under the car with the puck in the cradle. Without it, the jack fits perfectly. The funny thing is, using it without, it makes you wonder what the puck is for.
  • edited November -1
    A tesla ranger told me that he doesn't recommend pucks or pads. He said they aren't needed.
  • edited November -1
    Make your own. I've use them on other vehicles that have jacking points, they work great.

  • edited November -1
    Nguyenning - Those jack pucks in that link, were made out of hockey pucks. Just like the ones in my YouTube link, and anyone can make them for that price. Just saying.
  • edited November -1
    @ODWms, I found I had to drive my LR RWD up onto 2x4s to get my hydraulic lift to fit with the set of pads I purchased. For mine, without the lift pads, the configuration of the lift points on the hydraulic lift would either damage the battery cover or the outer edge of the car's body, so the pads are a must in my situation, and lifting the whole car at once allows many more options for tire rotation.
  • edited November -1
    @Nguyenning: Thanks for the link. They ended up being $22.50 for the set, well worth the premium over buying hockey pucks and modifying them. Hopefully, they will be shipped soon.
  • edited November -1
    It all depends on the lift/jack set up. A 2x4 can also be used to keep the lift pad from hitting the battery or bodywork.
  • edited May 2019
    No way a 2x4 would fit on my jack and go under my car. And my jack is supposedly “low profile.”
  • edited November -1
    Yeah, Costco wouldn't lift my car without jack pads either. So I made my own, as @calvin940 mentioned. By the time I got back to Costco, they had gotten their own Model 3 jack pads, and didn't need mine after all. But I keep them in the frunk since I may be in some little town somewhere and need emergency tire service at a place that doesn't have the pads.

    Now Amazon regularly tries to sell me hockey stuff. I haven't played hockey since I was in high school.
  • edited May 2019
    ODWms, I've seen you post this a few times now always calling it supposedly "low Profile" Does your jack resemble this one with min height of 3.25"?

    https://www.harborfreight.com/3-ton-low-profile-steel-professional-floor-jack-with-rapid-pump-orange-64240.html
  • edited November -1
    ODWms set 4 pieces of 2x4 on ground in front of tires, drive up in them, your jack will fit.
  • edited May 2019
    @ElectricAlex +1, exactly my point above.
  • edited May 2019
    4 "practice" pucks from Dicks, as they weigh more, about $10. Drill a ¾" hole, about half way thru. Insert a piece of ¾" PVC pipe that you probably have laying around, glued in with Gorilla glue. Hockey tape around the piping to increase diameter for a friction fit when inserted under your car.

    Works great.
  • edited May 2019
    Why on earth are jack pads required? Why would Tesla design jacking points which cannot be used as jacking points?
  • edited November -1
    @bj, they aren't necessarily required, but they do prevent damage to the battery cover and under edge of the rocker panel when jacking up the car. Stick your head under your car and look for the holes intended for the jack pads and you'll understand why.

    Many manufacturers are going to the same design for various reasons.
  • edited May 2019
    Still puzzled... why would Tesla design jack points that, if used as designed and without additional aids, would cause “damage to the battery cover”?
  • edited November -1
    @bj
    Depends on the profile of the jack.
  • edited May 2019
    For those that are curious these are the jacks TESLA mobile service uses. The safety stand that fits around the base of the jack is a nifty thing I have not seen before.

    https://imgur.com/EvBXLxR
  • edited May 2019
    @bj. Using jack pads, 2x4, hockey pucks or other to lift a inabody vehiclenis nothing new or specific to Tesla. Many unibody (not body on frame) vehicles have small or odd lift points. I’ve used hockey pucks on our E, CLR and 911. I used squares of 2x4 with a groove cut down the center for our Subaru’s.
  • I'm planning on buying a jack - can I use a 2-tonne jack on the Model 3?
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