Model 3

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My New Model 3 SR+ Only Has 220 Mile Range

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Comments

  • edited October 2019
    In my case with 3 months and 16000 kms, I'm getting 354kms at 100%, about 219 miles. went to service and they told me that it's the expected degradation from first usage and it will then stabilize.
    Also seemed to happen with 20129.32.2.2
  • edited October 2019
    In fact, I just depleted 95% and used 42kwh, 287km with 148wh/km
  • edited October 2019
    @mathew.ls - Does your screen show Standard Plus when you hit the big T to get to your easter eggs?
  • edited October 2019
    It does, Standard plus.
  • edited October 2019
    @ llim3306, Snake Oil, I have the exact same thing. Took delivery 6 weeks ago (8/21) in Toronto. Emailed support 9/26 and no reply yet. Just emailed my sales rep and delivery specialist today since I don't know where else to reach out to. Please keep us posted.
  • edited November -1
    I know this isn't related directly to the op but there is a point here.

    I wouldn't think to drive 1000 miles on an ice car rated at 50 miles to the gallon with a 20-gallon tank.
    Someday the epa will require a real-world driving range on EVs. The limit for ice cars isn't range its a cost indicator. To bad range is such an issue for EVs because if the EV sticker was simply a cost indicator the world would look better to new EV owners.
  • edited October 2019
    EVs should be advertised based on their efficiency, Wh/mile. Like gas cars are advertised by their MPG and not by their range or their gas tank size. All this is, is new product anxiety.
  • edited October 2019
    I was freaked out by all of the numbers my first month too but then I followed the advice of someone on this forum and switched to %.
  • edited October 2019
    @KAM6

    Probably @Bighorn. Also, Bighorn is always right.
  • edited October 2019
    It’s the same as newer ICE cars that shows the fuel efficiency. Every full tank of gas gives you different mile range estimation.

    Example:

    2014 Acura MDX 21 mpg city / 26 mpg highway

    19.5 gallons fuel tank

    21 mpg x 19.5 gal = 409.5 miles

    26 mpg x 19.5 gal = 507 miles

    Every full tank of gas range that the MdX shows? Ranges from 327 miles to 370 miles. Rarely I would see 400 range even on very long freeway drives.

    We’re just used to seeing the fuel tank gauge and we can estimate how far can we go. The battery percentage is the same. We’re just not used to it.

    One solution is, Tesla should also show other charging options in the screen, aside from superchargers, in the area, on the way or at the destination. And build more superchargers especially here in SoCal. There’s just too many Tesla owners here now.
  • edited October 2019
    I think one way to see if the battery degrades is to see how long it can hold a charge. Much like your smartphone. If in your daily normal use you consume 20%, then one day it shows 30% and more, with the same normal use then the battery is degrading. Relying on the range will just drive you crazy. That’s why ICE car manufacturers don’t state that their car has a 400 mile range on a full tank. Imagine the people suing them left and right for that.

    Elon should have given a mile range instead of a fix number. Let’s say, SR+ can give you between 180 miles to 250 miles depending on many factors.
  • edited October 2019
    "while seemingly also offering everything the Tesla has (that is meaningful) and then you still say the Tesla is of better value."

    I say this so much. +1000
  • edited October 2019
    "Every full tank of gas gives you different mile range estimation."Luna620

    As you note, most cars today offer a miles estimated based on usage of last tank of fuel. Tesla offers the same thing with the "Estimated Range" which you have to purchase 3rd party apps to see.

    Tesla's "Estimated Range" is estimated based on recent usage, just like the gasoline cars. "Rated Range" is based on EPA ratings.

    Range and miles are the only thing that matter, not "full" or "percentage" which have to be translated to range to having any practical use.

    @Clam's issue of range, this video probably has the best explanation. It also matches your results.

  • edited October 2019
    @FISHEV just provided actually useful information. Please log this post 10/4/2019 - 12:35pm EST
  • edited October 2019
    "Range and miles are the only thing that matter, not "full" or "percentage" which have to be translated to range to having any practical use."

    Wrong. The only thing that matters is if the car serves the needs of the owner. I could give a rats ass about some number on a display. All I care about is if the car will get me to and from my destinations and our Tesla Model 3 does that fine. People that want to focus on a number that becomes a variable based on many other factors are just plain idiots.
  • edited October 2019
    I can agree with M8B on this note:

    People have to pay attention to when they need to refuel. Whether or not they do that with a range estimator or a % capacity number is irrelevant, they both achieve the same goal. Arguing which one is "the one that matters" is semantics and not relevant to the fact that everyone who drives has to pay attention to their fuel (whichever it may be) capacity in their vehicle.
  • edited October 2019
    "Arguing which one is "the one that matters" is semantics and not relevant to the fact that everyone who drives has to pay attention to their fuel (whichever it may be) capacity in their vehicle."@andy.connor.e

    Not the issue here. People have range issues and post about it. A common and meaningless reply is "forget about it use percent" which is a deflection and provides no information on the issue of range capability of the person's car and their driving styles affect on range.

    As for people using "range" or "percent", suffice that all current cars added trip computers to prominently display range in miles (as noted above by @Luna620) because full/percent tank/battery is a number that always needs to be translated to miles to have any practical use.
  • edited October 2019
    Using % is not meaningless. It is meaningless to try and get people to focus on an estimate that becomes a variable when you start driving. You put fuel in when you get low, end of story.
  • edited October 2019
    Who is having range issues in the regard that the range of the vehicle is prohibiting them from doing something?
  • edited October 2019
    In my case I went to the service center again and they where doing some maths for about 20 minutes and they came back with "expected degradation". I'm a bit surprised as I've lost about 30kms of real range and winter is not here
  • edited October 2019
    How long have you owned your car?
  • edited October 2019
    "Who is having range issues in the regard that the range of the vehicle is prohibiting them from doing something?"@andy.connor.e

    Pretty much by definition everyone who has range issues or they would not look on the lower than expected range as a problem as post about it. Even with the all the censorship on the Tesla Forums, range issues are a top topic.
  • edited November -1
    "Pretty much by definition everyone who has range issues or they would not look on the lower than expected range as a problem as post about it."

    The only range issues being reported on Tesla Forums, are people's estimated range indicators having variance. I have not read a single thread or comment from an owner indicating they couldnt drive to a location because of range limitation. Wrong again FISHEV, not sure why you deliberately say things that are objectively false. Especially when you say it to other people who actively use these forums.
  • edited October 2019
    I find it amusing that people say they cannot drive with the energy gauge being a percentage. How did people drive before Tesla when that's how literally every car worked.
  • edited October 2019
    Its an illusive anxiety.
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