Model 3

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My New Model 3 SR+ Only Has 220 Mile Range

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  • edited October 2019
    I already know the counter argument "but there are more gas stations".

    Agreed, just tell the car where you are going. It will make sure you get there with the energy you require and even show you how much percentage the battery will have when you get back home.

    The car is smart, let it do the work and stop worrying...
  • edited October 2019
    I think people believe they have to worry about it. If i heard everyone around me telling eachother to be concerned about their refrigerator catching on fire, in time it would drill an irrational anxiety into my head to be concerned about it.

    I have a family member who actually has that kind of anxiety about things catching on fire. Sometimes its completely irrational, but the anxiety just exists. I cant wait until i can actually show people around me that this is not something to ever be concerned about. If you charge at home, you dont need to worry.
  • edited October 2019
    Let’s say your brand new cell phone showed “Hours” of battery life instead of percentage of battery life. Every night you plug in your phone and it charges fully to 12 hours. One day you charge it fully and it says 10 hours. You’re going to say there’s nothing wrong with that?

    10 hours of use might be plenty and it’s easy to keep it charged throughout the day. But you’re missing the point if you don’t think it’s a problem with either the battery or software. That’s the issue we are having with our decreased capacity.
  • edited October 2019
    @kel It is more like this though.

    Your cell phone says 12 hours but it seems to last you about 10.5 hours.

    After some time your cell phone says 10.75 hours but last you about 10.5 hours.
  • edited October 2019
    Just had a lengthy talk with Tesla in the chat feature. I have a SR+ built in 6/19 , live in Fla and went to charge to 100% in preparation for a road trip next week and the car reflects 220 miles. I have previously extrapolated my range at 80%(175 range) 90%(196 range) and this coincides with the SR 220 mile range rather than the ~240 I’m supposed to receive. The rep stated a configuration change was made to the car on 9/3/19 (coincides with hurricane Dorian to hit Fla) and escalated it to the support team.

    After a lengthy delay while the rep reached out to appropriate parties, came back with a script that essentially said when you consistently charge between 60-80% the estimation becomes less accurate and underestimates the true capacity of the battery.

    They rep had them do additional diagnosis and “they do not think now that it a battery limitation.

    I think either my car was locked to a SR before delivery (window sticker states 220 miles epa range, with my correct vin) or that during the hurricane fiasco, the car was erroneously reduced to 220 miles instead of SR cars being upgraded to 240.

    Still confused, but I have a service appointment on 10/14 to see if they can “find” anything else. Most likely they will say nothing is wrong or it’s normal degradation at 5,000 miles.

    Either way this is frustrating because I don’t believe that 10% degradation is acceptable. I want to believe that they accidentally pushed an update, or the car is still locked on the back end to a SR. Everything else with the car is fantastic, I just think you should get what you pay for.
  • edited October 2019
    You bought a SR+ but received a SR?
  • edited October 2019
    @courson: do your rear seat heaters work?
  • edited October 2019
    When pressing the T logo on the car, it shows standard plus. But no, I don’t have rear seat heater functionality. Did a deep cycle and still showing 220 miles at 100%. I had to cancel my service center appointment, but from others on this forum it seems like they act dismissive of anything wrong with the vehicle.
  • edited October 2019
    I wish we could get through one of these threads without 100 “the indicated range isn’t the real range in all conditions” posts. I think everyone recognizes that.

    The concern is to what extent does a drop in indicated range correspond to a decline in available storage capacity.

    For example, my SR+ was giving a range of 232 when new. Then dropped to 228. And now 224. That’s in 4K miles. Does it represent that I really have 10% less total capacity than I would have expected? In general, the tests I’ve made looking at consumption and remaining % would say yes.
  • edited October 2019
    if that were true, how do you account for people who gain percentage? Mine varies both directions anywhere from 272 - 277. This morning was 275, but 2 weeks ago was 272 for about 4 days.
  • edited November 2019
    I also have this same concern about my available range.

    I don’t care about my actual MPGE I get that will change depending on how I drive, but I don’t understand why the calculated range on my car says 227 when it’s rated at 240. If other owners are seeing 240 as there calculated range for a fully charged model 3 SR+ why shouldn’t I. I’ve already followed all the steps to reset the battery! I’ve take. It in to Tesla Service and they say the battery is normal, but it may have 5% battery degradation. Shouldn’t Tesla make this right?
  • edited November 2019
    I also have this same concern about my available range.

    I don’t care about my actual MPGE I get that will change depending on how I drive, but I don’t understand why the calculated range on my car says 227 when it’s rated at 240. If other owners are seeing 240 as there calculated range for a fully charged model 3 SR+ why shouldn’t I. I’ve already followed all the steps to reset the battery! I’ve take. It in to Tesla Service and they say the battery is normal, but it may have 5% battery degradation. Shouldn’t Tesla make this right?
  • edited November 2019
    "Shouldn’t Tesla make this right?"@mike.hagbert

    Yes is the short and correct answer.

    This is coming up again with LR AWD which was just boosted to 322 mile range. Tesla charges the new car buyers $500 for this so there does not appear to be any hardware or cost to Tesla, just range that was "in the bank" from the EPA tests.

    Tesla should up all LR AWD to 322 but Tesla is totally dark on the topic. I'd even pay the $500.
  • edited November 2019
    There's also resale issue. An SR+ that shows 240 range as base is going to get a higher resale price than one that can only show 220.
  • edited November 2019
    Any query that begins with negatives such as 'couldn't', 'wouldn't', 'shouldn't', 'don't', or 'won't', should always be ignored by default. Rephrased in the positive if possible. And answered in the negative if insisted upon.
  • edited November 2019
    As the owner of an SR+ (May 2019), the biggest issue isn't the maximum range claimed on the screen - it's the difficulty of achieving anything like that range under real-world driving conditions.

    If I monitor my usage using the Energy graphs, I can only stay at or under the official run rate if I consciously drive very, very conservatively, don't pass anyone and park my car at the bottom of the hill and walk home. If I drive in such a way as to keep up with regular traffic or climb hills at more than a crawl, my real range is typically around 180 miles per full charge.

    The good news is that I can usually deal with this, as I can charge at home. But for longer trips, this is concerning. Had I understood this, I may have ponied up for a LR model.
  • edited November 2019
    Magic 8 Ball - "The only thing that matters is if the car serves the needs of the owner. I could give a rats ass about some number on a display."

    Wow, so to you it doesn't matter that you buy a car that suppose to go 200 miles (240 range displayed), but only goes 180 miles? You make 0 sense. The "displayed estimated range" is there for a reason. Of course everybody knows we all get much less of actual miles, nobody is talking about that here. But when fully charged, SR+ should be getting 235-240 miles, if it's 220 then there is obviously a problem. People who say switch to percentage are stupid.
  • edited November 2019
    @1214vn
    "People who say switch to percentage are stupid"
    Reading this line was the only one required in order to know your posts should be ignored.
  • edited November 2019
    You're so funny calvin940, I'm guessing you don't have this issue, so why are you commenting here
  • edited November 2019
    Tesla is maintaining that the most battery loss is in the first year. I’m hoping that is correct because I have a LeMR that when I purchased was suppose to get 260 miles of range, then upped to 264 miles of range. Currently I get 244 miles of range. I received my car the day after Thanksgiving last year so maybe this is where my range will end. I’m not happy about it as it leaves my car with approximately 200 miles of careful driving to make it from supercharger to supercharger on a trip. Everyday use if great as I have a home charger and 200 miles is ample. If it keeps falling then Tesla will have to come up with a solution. I have talked to my local SC 3 times about this as it wasn’t a gradual loss but a couple of times falling off the cliff. I’ve also talked to Tesla through emails and they just don’t understand as it always comes back to your driving habits, heat usage, etc. Good luck everyone. This is my one and only complaint of my car. Other than this issue, I absolutely love my car. I wish I would have purchased the LR as then I wouldn’t be so worried about this situation. But since I already paid $58,000 fully loaded, I couldn’t see to pay an additional $4000. If only I liked black and those areowheels. That was my $4000 right there.
  • edited November 2019
    Battery degradation is not unique to Tesla and is in fact not as bad on a Tesla. They didn’t solve the problem, they just minimized it.

    For those who are still in the process of buying:

    Having owned three EV’s prior to the Model 3 including a Model S, I bought anticipating some degradation and perhaps worst than average for a Tesla in deciding. Averages are statistical but you don’t make plans based on average because if you end up on the bottom side of averages, then you end up SOL. Half of the people do better than averag, but half so worst. Most don end up right that that average number. Sheer luck where you end up at so don’t count on luck.
  • edited November 2019
    So back to the issue of 322 LR AWD rating.

    If someone purchased a Model 3 LR AWD after Tesla raised the range to 322, they should have a car with Rated Range of 322 and this should be reflected in the Rated Range display.

    1. Why wouldn't people who purchased LR AWD after increase get the range increase?
    2. Has anyone actually seen 322 in their rated range?
  • edited November 2019
    And to the issue or LR RWD not getting their rated miles.
  • edited November 2019
    No car has ever given me the rated range whether it be gas and a gas tank or batteries. This is because have never given me the rated MPG. So now it’s a problem?
  • edited November 2019
    Turning off the cliff again I see, Tesla is not every other car. My current EV delivers on average 20% more of published EPA rated range and has no vampire drain and only uses 0.5 kW to keep me work in NE winters (thanks to Heat Pump). So speak for your own car, please. To this day, my car never delivered EPA range indeed, only difference with your EV, mine over delivers every single time, and "that is the way I like it" and should be, lol
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