Model 3

Am I Crazy?

That is actually a rhetorical question....but I've made an SC appointment for next Tuesday morning. The reason for the appointment is new tires. My original tires just passed 13k miles, and while they are not all the way down I just don't want to take them all the way down. Even if there was a spare, my days of being semi-happy about changing a tire on the side of the road is so far behind me it long since receded from view.....

So of course I began to think about better tread wear, or a touring tire. Tire Rack has a number of choices. But at the end of it all I made the appointment, and then called the SC this morning.

I asked a couple of questions, one of them being about choice of tires, and was told that the only choice is the original tire. And then I asked the price.... its ~$1400. My first thought was to cancel the SC appointment. I am certain I could get a touring tire choice on the car for $800-$900, but it would be a bit less convenient. And of course I read about lifting the car, and got to thinking about valet mode, etc.... and how many tire installers have Tesla experience around here.

So now I'm keeping the appointment. Go ahead and answer the title question despite my claim that its rhetorical.
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Comments

  • edited July 2019
    dude.... go to Costco and get better tires doe half the price. You can also than get free rotations and balancing. They will also fill with nitrogen so the pressure does not change due to temperature. its a win-win-win. Costco has the tesla pads and are trained.

    Yes you are crazy!
  • edited July 2019
    I have no personal experience with this, but other people have reported using different tires from the OEM ones on Model S and having them installed elsewhere. If you're not changing the tire size, it should be easy. Unless there's some urgency, do a little research before you spend too much for Tesla tires.

    On my previous Model S, I had to replace one tire due to damage. I replaced it with the same tire, and had the Tesla Service Center do it. The same tire was quite a bit less expensive at Tire Rack, but the SC claimed there was something different about the one from Tesla. I think that was probably BS, and I would have been fine buying the one from Tire Rack and installing it elsewhere.
  • edited July 2019
    the difference was likely the piece of foam they put in there which supposedly lessens road noise.
  • edited July 2019
    As it turns out, there is a Costco just down the road from the Tesla SC. I think I'll call them tomorrow and check them out. If they can talk me into a good touring tire with a good price, I'll cancel the SC appointment.

    Thanks for the suggestion Joshan.
  • edited July 2019
    Of course there also is the foam insert part of this subject - the Tire Rack Michelin Pilot doesn't have that, while the Tesla SC does. I do not have any problems with road noise in my car - its the quietest ride I've ever had. If I end up with Costco there will be something else to learn from this as well.
  • edited November -1
    Joshan, didn't see your post - but I guess you're referring to the S tire....
  • edited November -1
    who actually buys tires from the manufacturer of the car???
  • edited July 2019
    America's Tire has a wide variety of sets from under $450 to $900. In the Sacramento area, they are well-versed with Tesla and have the appropriate tools and pads to work on them. Not to mention that they provide free rotations and plug repairs, and offer the option to buy three-year warranties to cover damage (on our California roads I always get my money's worth on them). I've bought tires from them for years and will definitely go there when my 3 needs new shoes.

    I'm not sure if they can get the foam version or not, but I'm not really sold on the foam anyway - and I definitely don't see the value in paying double to buy them.
  • edited July 2019
    Quick update after reading @vmulla's post: America's Tire sells the OEM Primacy #16144 (apparently the foam version) for $900/set installed. And rebates are available.
  • edited July 2019
    Not sure where you live...

    Seever & Sons
    3687 Old Santa Rita Rd, Pleasanton, CA 94588

    Dublin SC is working with them because by law the SC cannot give a warranty on the tire like a tire dealer can.

    They repaired my front tire when I picked up a nail...no charge.
  • edited July 2019
    When getting other tires:
    Check the rolling resistance since a higher number can decrease range up to 10%, (LRR=Low Rolling resistance) and get the highest load index you can - car requires 98 - anything under 98 is going to be risky for our relatively heavy cars!

    When going to another installer:
    1. Know about jack points?
    2. Know the torque spec for the nuts? (129 pound feet)
    3. Know the socket size? (21 mm)
    4. Are TPMS monitors included? Are the settings affected by install?
    5. Do you know how to align the tires?
  • edited November -1
    Discount Tire here in San Diego will install the OEM tires for about $1200.00 (total cost)

    Costco can be a good choice, but they only sell a handful of brands.
  • edited July 2019
    @M3phan... how do you check the LRR? Many tire websites don't include that number in their description of the tires. I am specifically referring to Discount Tire website
  • edited July 2019
    @RES IPSA, Here’s a link to Tire Rack’s list of LRR tires ( I assume not every one of these would be a match for a model three, but here’s the list anyway):
    https://www.tirerack.com/landing/fuel_efficiency.jsp?to_desktop=true&s_kwcid=AL!3756!10!77653078562386!31064839800&ef_id=XSfbUwAABYt4JwZR:20190712011346:s
  • edited November -1
    … Click the second tab on that page link above…
  • edited July 2019
    Thanks
  • edited November -1
    HANKOOK VENTUS S1 NOBLE2 H452 (235 /45 R18 98W XL BSW)

    That is the tire I am going to get. It is low roll resistance and less than $700 installed on the car.
  • edited July 2019
    @RES, let us know how those work for you. I am nervous about tires from Korea. Probably unfounded, but Michelins never have disappointed me.
  • edited November -1
    Fantastic advice M3Phan. I'm going to write that stuff down now in the hopes I remember it.
  • edited July 2019
    : )
  • edited July 2019
    And after looking at other tires, I ended up sticking with another set of the Michelin Primacy MXM4s. : )
  • edited July 2019
    @gballant4570, interested in what you find as I believe are in MD and also go to the Owings Mills SC. I have 22,000 miles on my tires and they still perform well although I'l be getting them rotated again soon.
  • edited July 2019
    I always do my own tires—it saves mad time, little bit of money, and you’ll know for sure that you applied the correct torque (rather than all those shops that torque them as hard as they can, which can make wheels impossible to remove when you’re stranded with a flat on side of the road.)

    I use vinyl coated sockets so I don’t scratch my wheels (I would, I really would), a breaker bar, a click style torque wrench, and a floor jack. I can swap all four in about half an hour with just these hand tools. I’m not a big, burly dude either, so anyone could do it. Compare that time to making an appointment, driving there, waiting, etc.

    I used to use hockey pucks as jack pads, but I bought a real set, which I now prefer. They fit perfectly; the o-ring holds them in until the jack pad makes contact; highly recommended:

    https://www.reverselogic.us/jack-pads.html#!/Tesla/

    2015 Model S 85D
    Lug Nut: 22mm Hex, 14x1.50 Thread
    Torque: 175Nm / 129 lb-fts
  • edited July 2019
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