Model 3

Did Tesla tested Electromagnetic radiation while charging with supercharger?

edited November -1 in Model 3
Hi,

I was wondering if Tesla or anyone tested radiation / emf while supercharger is charging the car. Usually people sit inside (me too)
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Comments

  • edited October 2019
    Since supercharger uses DC, no EMF would be present. Just FUD .
  • edited November -1
    You are also sitting inside a large Faraday cage that had been properly grounded. Again, not an issue...
  • edited October 2019
    If you have concerns, don't buy an EV.
  • edited October 2019
    To echo that, buy a 1950's diesel. Nothing electric, not even spark plugs in one of those.
  • edited October 2019
    I've wondered this, too, which is why I don my chainmail armor prior to charging up the M3.
  • edited October 2019
    All my hair has fallen out, I don't think they tested.
  • edited November -1
    M8B: Before or after you bought your car?
  • edited October 2019
    My mistake, but whatever is wrong with me is most likely Tesla's fault.
  • edited November -1
    Or worse, i think its Elon's fault.
  • edited November -1
    I blame Obama
  • edited November -1
    This thread has the highest laughs per posts ratio in a long time :)
  • edited October 2019
    Also, i think this is a good time to note that someone is considering EMF radiation from an induced magnetic field from current flow down a wire. Supercharging, something you would do for less than an hour, presumably a couple maybe 3 times per week? Nevermind the phone you own that gives off radiation every second its on, all the cellphone towers and the countless wifi radio waves you're exposed to. If you have smart devices in your house thats even more. 5G is being released despite negative health effects. But im sure the supercharger current flow through that wire is of some significance.
  • edited November -1
    I think several of you need to consider that many people are not very knowledgeable about charging, cellular / wireless radio transmission, etc... and it's completely understandable that someone could have a question about whether a huge, powerful battery would give off some sort of electromagnetic radiation.

    Some of the responders gave helpful responses without just assuming that it was an attempt to spread FUD - thanks to you!
  • edited October 2019
    A tinfoil hat has been proven to protect you, I suggest you get one.
  • edited November -1
    I thought the aluminium in tin foil caused Parkinson's. Tin when combined with electronics will definitely cause whiskers.
  • edited November -1
    Oh no. This terrible. Why did they do that. Must be master plan to reduce human population = reducing CO2 pollutions.
  • edited October 2019
    Is
  • edited October 2019
    I was in an Apple store once looking at cases for my phone. A customer very eagerly asked an associate whether they had any cases that would shield the harmful radiation coming from the phone. I tried to explain that the harmful radiation is what turns the phone from a paperweight into a communication device. He didn't get it.
  • edited November -1
    @msmith55

    Hum so DC has no electromagnetic field???

    How do you think a DC relay works or DC motor or a selenoid, how can you mesure the DC amperage of a wire using a clamp on meter......if current goes thru a wire it will create a electromagnetic field, the difference is DC will have a constant electromagnetic field (except when closing or opening the circuit wich cause a variation)

    Without electromagnetic field all the car starter wouldn't start......it's a powerful DC motor :-)

    Cheers
  • edited November -1
    @msmith55 is an old memorable account name. Welcome back!
  • edited October 2019
    Absolutely Tesla had testing performed by 3rd party and possibly some internal testing. This is required by FCC to meet emission standards. https://fccid.io/2AEIM
    Tesla could not sell their products without FCC approval. If you have questions about the standards, contact the FCC.
  • edited October 2019
    Seems like this thread is a copy/paste from one a few weeks ago...
  • edited October 2019
    Here is background on applicable IEC standards
    https://www.iec.ch/emc/emc_news/pdf/2017/5_EMC for Emobility-2017.pdf
  • edited October 2019
    This is a legitimate question which applies to both intentional and unintentional radiators. You'll find Declarations of Conformity for the standards required by various subsystems in the Owners Manual. Test reports as well as RF maximum permissible exposure calcs are available on the FCC Office of Engineering and Technology website: https://apps.fcc.gov/oetcf/eas/reports/GenericSearch.cfm

    And as noted above, Tesla could not sell their products without FCC authorization or Industry Canada, Europe CE, etc.
  • edited November -1
    Supercharging is DC power. No radiations. For L2 charging is a valid question.
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