Model 3

Reduced regen

This is the first winter weather with my M3. I’ve had reduced regen before and the regen still worked. Today, @28 degrees, I had no regen at all for the first 2-3 miles. Is that normal at these temperatures?

Comments

  • edited November -1
    yes, warm your car up for 15 mins or so before leaving. The temp of the heat does not matter for the battery heating, just has to be on.
  • edited November -1
    I'm seeing it also and just 40-50's. The dotted line indicating lower regen. Just something we'll see in colder weather for those of us with our first winter in an EV.
  • edited November -1
    Yep, perfectly normal. Though I will say anecdotally that I don't think 15 minutes is going to do it. It was about that temp for me this morning and even sitting for 5 minutes with battery preconditioning on did not do anything noticeable in increasing the battery temperature required for regen to come back at all.
  • edited November 2019
    @derotam Tesla has said that regen comes back much faster with actual driving than with preconditioning. (ie 5 minutes of driving is more effective than 5 minutes of preconditioning)
  • edited November 2019
    The most energy efficient way to warm the battery is to charge it. Several forum members bump up the charge limit 5% shortly before they leave.

    Did that today before heading to Springfield. It was 28 all day, but I had a warm battery. Arrived home tonight with 40 miles range remaining.
  • edited November 2019
    kevin_rf +1

    Warming charge for an hour before leaving in cold weather, and cabin heating on shore power as well. Not only your regen will be much better, your road efficiency/range will appreciate it.
  • edited November -1
    @Kathy: that is not accurate, at least not with an outside temperature of 4C. See the bottom of my OP here https://forums.tesla.com/forum/forums/temperatures-vs-time-short-drivegraph#new

    After that drive I still hadn't recovered half of the lost regen. I would be willing to bet that at a stand still with Preconditioning on, that I would have recovered all my regen within 30 minutes max. I will be attempting to test tomorrow morning.
  • edited November -1
    Let me also say that this is in regards to a RWD car
  • edited November 2019
    Timing your charging to finish right before you leave (at whatever percentage) is the best way to have a toasty battery, unless you have to dial down the amps too far. At home this leads to inefficient charging (marginally higher electricity cost). At a Destination Charger I wouldn’t worry about the extra pennies the establishment will incur if I’m paying $130 for a room. I’ve easily done the latter more digits than hands and feet. Depending on Level II vs HPWC, there is a learning curve to find the sweet spot for amps, but a little trial and error and you’ll get it.
  • edited November 2019
    If this is post 2019.35.x.x update, I find the new "Hold" regen setting to seem to have softer regen for most of the range and then more aggressive regen at the very end to stop.

    I like the full stop but I liked the more aggressive in the midrange.

    Just impressions in first couple of days.
  • edited November 2019
    No difference in expense for many of us - I pay 11 cents/kwh all the time.
  • edited November -1
    @gballant, don’t confuse total expenditures with efficiency from the wall to the car. Lower amps are worse, unless you have no other choice.
  • edited November 2019
    I too noticed that regen is greatly limited or nonexistent in cool-cold temps we've had this past week. It sometimes returns after driving ~20-30 minutes, and sometimes not. The main inconvenience is that with the greater drain on the battery generally in cold temps, without regen the reduction in range at the end of a commute is much greater. I assume I'll have to get used to this in winter.
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