Model 3

Temps, Precondition, Regen data with GRAPHS

1246710

Comments

  • edited January 9
    @majassow: Driver 150lb, cargo less than 30lbs.
  • edited January 9
    Based on posted curb weights for LR RWD of 3805-3814 lbs, that makes the regen efficiency 98%.
    Which is incredible.
    In both meanings of the word :-).

    There is some error due to my measurement of the area under the curve from a posted photo... Since you have the raw data, any chance you can calculate that directly from the data?
  • edited January 9
    @majassow, 3% efficiency loss per hundred pounds, hmm, guess I will never be as efficient as derotam. Lol

    @derotam, I was thinking exactly the same regarding SC charge rate and distance. I mainly asked because I live about 25 minutes from a SC and the only time I tried pre-warming I didn't notice any improvement in Regen so either the distance matters which I expected or I need to repeat the test a few more times.
  • edited January 9
    ADinM3: you misunderstand: you don't lose efficiency for an increase in mass. It just changes the reference for the data that derotam collected. You'll see exactly the same regen efficiency, but if your mass is higher, you'd get longer regen than derotam.
  • edited November -1
    @majassow, Yes, my joke was poorly worded.
  • edited January 16
    Hey Bighorn, was just thinking about regen efficiency and had the thought of comparing energy used for a 0-70mph run vs regen from 70-0. I looked back at my data where I did a 70-0 regen and then immediately a 0-70 acceleration. Very preliminarily here I got an 80% return from the regen. Does that sound reasonable? I am going to look at the data more closely to see if I am missing anything but I wanted to toss a first pass at you to see what you thought.

    0-69.5mph acceleration used 0.302kWh of energy, and 69.5-0 regen captured 0.243kWh.

    Method of analysis using captured OBDII CANbus data
    Divided each Motor Power value by 3,600,000 to get kWh per millisecond, then multiplied by the number of ms from last Motor Power data point. Then just added it all up.
  • edited January 16
    I mean, even not driving the car that sounds reasonable because the motors were not responsible for 100% of the vehicle slowing down.
  • edited January 16
    "I've assumed the in route battery warming takes into account distance to avoid premature warming."

    Last 10 miles seem to be the most important. Yesterday when the cold weather ran the car down to 6 miles of range and I had to use the new electrify America fast charger that went in 2 miles from work (150kW max, 50kW Chademo for non-CCS Tesla owners). On the way, 18 miles, to the SC, three hours later, the Preconditioning didn't come on until 8 miles out. Typically when I go from home to SC, 10 miles, Preconditioning starts immediately. Makes sense as that is colder battery, having sat overnight for 10 hours.

    This was in 32F in the AM and 40F by 2PM.

    When I got there I could only charge to 90kW from the charger. I wonder due to the low state of the battery if Preconditioning was reduced and battery temp was low enough to restrict charging from the 140kW that the 150kW SC's should be providing. Only 3/8 of us charging but two chargers were down, one lights out, tape around it, nacelle broken and one just put out 3kW (three of us tried it and that's all it did) so no reason for low power other than SC malfunction on battery still too cold for 140kW as car was preserving range to get to SC.

    Range after EA charge and cooling off was 7%/22 miles battery/Rated but Projected, based the cold last 30 miles of driving, was 18 miles with SC 18 miles away.

    In both cases, at 10 miles away, that's about 15 minutes. Be interesting to see how consistently that is over the Winter.
  • edited January 16
    The methodology seems reasonable, but it has a couple of assumptions:
    1) that power is constant across each time internal, and
    2) that all kinetic energy converted this way is captured in the batteries.

    2 is the least likely, there will be losses from heating. However they’re potentially minimal.

    My $.02
  • edited November -1
    @thefish, January 16:
    “Last 10 miles seem to be the most important. Yesterday when the cold weather ran the car down to ***6 miles*** of range and I had to use the new electrify America fast charger that went in 2 miles from work ”

    @thefish, January 15 (i.e., yesterday)
    “After seeing ***“3 miles”*** range left on the car at noon in the parking lot, I zipped over to the new Electrify America fast charger just 2 miles from the shop.”

    @Abraham Lincoln
    “No man has a good enough memory to be a successful liar"
  • edited January 16
    He changes his story because the first comment about 3 miles of range was on the previous page, and whenever the comments move to a new page everyone forgets what was said previously.

    Thank you @MAB for pointing this out again. Maybe people will pick up on that FISH is not a valid individual to respond to.
  • edited January 16
    @MAB1980: Yes, I agree about the time aspect The time between data points ranged from 1-206ms. There were only 3 intervals >100ms. Average interval was 14.59ms across 436 data points.

    That was for the 0-69.5 run. 70-0 regen was 1726 data points, 11.47ms average interval, 7 intervals >100ms.

    Other data to note is the motor power was indicated to a 0.5kW accuracy.
  • edited January 16
    Hey Fish, since you are saving all that money by not being able to install an outlet for charging your car at your house, why don't you go and spend ~$150 for an OBDII adapter, wiring harness, and ScanMyTesla APP, and get some REAL data!
  • edited January 16
    As you gain more experience with the car, you'll find the Tesla changes the Range rating as it warms up. The 3 miles it shows on the app became 6 then 8 miles as I drove the 2 miles to the EA chargers. It will even go up as ambient goes up. Battery was at 7% when I started charging which by Rated Range is 20 miles left (well 20 miles due to battery degradation after 16,000 miles) and Projected, taking into account the cold, wet, over 60 mph driving was around 8 miles. That 7% battery showed 3 miles, 6 miles, 8 miles as the car goes from Snowfake cold to warm. When I looked at 10A, sitting for four hours, it was 3 miles. Eek!!!. When I got in at Noon it was 6 miles. When I got to charger it was 8 miles.

    I doubt most owners with home charging see these numbers or situations while those of use without see it all the time. You get a much better idea of how EV's work in the real world if you depend on public charging as we depending on public fueling on ICE cars.
  • edited January 16
    If you had simply just left 15-20 min before work to a SC on your 60 min drive to work, you would’ve had almost half a tank. The drive itself would’ve warmed the battery fully to achieve high kW charging without the use of pre-conditioning since you fear that a lot (bonus)

    Buuuuut instead you spent hellla time charging at two different chargers.

    Too funny.
  • edited January 16
    @fish January 16
    “ When I looked at 10A, sitting for four hours, it was 3 miles. Eek!!!. When I got in at Noon it was 6 miles. ”

    @fish January 15
    “ After seeing “3 miles” range left on the car *at noon*”


    Shall we continue?
  • edited January 16
    Lolol the lies are creeping up.

    Too funny.
  • edited January 16
    "Shall we continue?"

    You bet...but links would be good vs. chopped up "recovered memories". The range does move with the temp even if the car is parked and not moving.

    What was shocking was that car had over 20 miles of range when I pulled into the lot in the AM and 3 when I looked before lunch to see how the cold was affecting the range. No passive loads like heat or Summon or Sentry on yet just the change in the battery temp dropped the range from making it to SC to not and needing a charge to get to the charge.
  • edited January 16
    @fishy
    If you had simply just left 15-20 min before work to a SC on your 60 min drive to work, you would’ve had almost half a tank. The drive itself would’ve warmed the battery fully to achieve high kW charging without the use of pre-conditioning since you fear that a lot (bonus)

    Buuuuut instead you spent hellla time charging at two different chargers.

    Too funny.
  • edited January 16
    Amazing that someone that claims to know a lot about EV's finds normal operation shocking.
  • edited January 16
    The inconsistency in FISH's story with his excuses are inexcusable. Especially considering his posts are here in this thread for everyone to view at any moment, there is nothing to say. He is just saying whatever is convenient to what he is responding to. There is no consistency.

    FISHEV = Robotic Response Generator V2.0
  • edited January 16
    Thought I had enough to not need charge night before to get to work and make SC after work. The 20 miles left when I got to work should have done it. It actually might have made the 18 miles to the SC even though Rated and Projected Range said it would not.

    Had all the Tesla issues that day, frozen out of car in AM, actual range getting whacked bad by the cold. It was the parking lot "loss" that did me in.
  • edited January 16
    Flagging helps him get away with his lies because the proof goes poof
  • edited January 16
    Tesla is a thinking person's vehicle, not a vehicle for someone with fish brain.
  • edited November -1
    Yo, Fish is broken record!
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