Model 3

Do you use and trust autopilot?

edited November 2019 in Model 3
Love my 2 month old car and all the features. I have tried autopilot several times for a minute or two but then manually take over. A little nervous as to will the car stop, etc. I am planning a small trip from Fort Mill, SC to Savannah GA,and then one to Boca Raton, FL. Deep down I would really like to use Autopilot and looking for some assurance from those of you who use it often.

Does AP work as advertised? Looking forward to hearing your reviews.
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Comments

  • edited November 2019
    It works great as long as you have well marked lane lines. You just have to be attentive while driving and ready to take over. My car drives me on ramp to off ramp everyday to work.
  • edited November 2019
    Yes, it works very well, you just need to watch it like a hawk and be prepared to take over if/when it gets confused. It's still in Beta. Happy travels!
  • edited November -1
    Rarely and for short intervals, and no, I don’t trust it as much as I trust myself (it’s pretty good and getting better, but I’m still a much better driver ;)

    Plus, I actually enjoy driving the M3 myself. :)
  • edited November 2019
    My first few days driving the M3 with FSD were very stressful and I realized I was approaching it wrong.

    It was stressful because it would choose a 'line' in the lane to follow and for curves that was different then I normally did and it worried me.

    My fix was to stop doing what was causing stress and I needed to learn more about how the car handled driving. I started using FSD on big multi lane highways that were almost empty. I drive to work around 5 AM. There are not a lot of cars on the turnpike at that time of day. That is where I started letting FSD work - and during stop and go traffic.

    I learned how the FSD worked and drove and developed confidence. I learned that when the lane gets really wide - a long merge or exit areas, that it wants to center between what it sees..and I now know to exit FSD in these areas - a slight lift UP on the gear selector exits FSD and adaptive cruise - so you do not have to jerk the steering wheel or touch the brake.

    FSD is an assistive tool. As you learn to use the tool, you will LOVE it!
  • edited November 2019
    Yes and yes, but I rarely use it because I enjoy driving the thing! I always use it in bumper-to-bumper traffic, but fortunately I don't see much b-b traffic around here. Sometimes I use it just to "plot the data points" for the streets in my area. We aren't overrun with Teslas yet in Central MA, so the neural network is learning from my car, so I feel an obligation to contribute to the data gathering.
  • edited November 2019
    I use it 90-95% of the time I am driving in most all situations. There are places I know it will fail and take over before that time, or places it is obviously not going to work well (i.e. airport, mall, etc). It is night and day better than when I got the car in January.
  • edited November -1
    @brscpo FSD (full self drive) has not been released yet. What you are using is Autopilot.
  • edited November 2019
    Yes. All the time or at least whenever it's appropriate. Never in neighborhood driving for example or when I'm only going a few blocks on main streets but otherwise it's really handy.

    It doesn't take very long before you're well aware of its limitations and when/where it's of major use. On long trips it's a 99.6% of the time thing. Makes driving so much less stressful.
  • edited November -1
    GHammer | November 27, 2019
    @brscpo FSD (full self drive) has not been released yet. What you are using is Autopilot.

    ******************

    This is not correct, FSD has been released. All that Autopilot contains is TACC and AutoSteer.

    FSD = NoaP, Auto Summon and much more (for people who did not buy when Enhanced Auto Pilot existed).
  • edited November 2019
    Not at all. It stays turned off. Why take the risk regardless of how small some may think it is.
  • edited November 2019
    except stats say you are less likely to crash.... I trust math and science more than opinion.
  • edited November 2019
    It works very well for me.
  • edited November 2019
    Nah, I have wife for that )
  • edited November 2019
    Do I use it? Yes, sometimes. Do I trust it? Not at all!!!!! It is simply a driver assist tool and when used as such it is fine. But like the fine print says you have to be prepared to take over at any time.
  • edited November 2019
    FSD is the name Tesla gave to the autopilot software that takes full advantage ( legally) of the autopilot hardware in the car. It is fully capable of fully autonomous driving, but it is software limited to adhere to current law.
    Yes, I use it, and as others have stated, it works well in its element. Use it, but pay as much attention to the road as if you were driving. You will learn its limitations and idiosyncrasies. It’s always improving through OTA updates. In the five months I’ve owned my M3, ( standard AP) it has gone from making sudden, jerky maneuvers to smooth adjustments. It’s only going to get better.
  • edited November 2019
    Yes, I use it every day on the way to work, and yes I trust it. I still watch it...
  • edited November 2019
    My model 3 just crossed 20,000 miles so I’ve had time to understand the best scenarios for autopilot. If traffic is flowing on a well marked highway it is great. Areas to avoid for autopilot: construction zones with temporary or erratic striping, aggressive drivers around you with fast and close lane changing, stop and go traffic with big speed changes.
    Another way to look at is if the driving is a little challenging for you, it’s way too challenging for autopilot.
  • edited November 2019
    Yes, use it 90% of my driving, love it! Driven RT using it from Anaheim to San Luis Obispo, CA, Anaheim to TorC New Mexico, Anaheim to Winsor, Ca and Anaheim to Las Vegas. Not to mention towns and cities in a 100 mile radus countless times. I own Tesla Model 3 dual motor over 16 months includes FSD.
  • edited November 2019
    i use it twice a day during the week and trust it. complete and total commute game changer.
  • edited November 2019
    Been using it for over a year, 31k miles.

    Non-Highway Surface roads, no
    *The exception is straight stretches of severe stop and go traffic where I manually use the brake as I deem necessary. In those cases I use it for keeping off the bumper of the person in front of me. Much less stressful.

    Highways, 95% of the time with NoAP turned off.
    *I cannot stand the constant lane changes that NoAP suggests. NoAP stays off.
    90+ mile commute, probably 80ish miles each day at highway speed. I like it around 75 MPH-ish. Occasionally I'll be as high as 80 MPH. At night, I'm lucky if traffic is moving 5 miles an hour. I tend to stay out of the left lane.

    I just watch it like I watch a teen driver. If it is not doing something I like, I interrupt and take control. It is pretty good, and an excellent tool to reduce driver fatigue. Took me 2 hours to drive home last night with all the pre-thanksgiving traffic. EAP was on the whole time with me mostly in the middle and right lane.
  • edited November 2019
    Yes and yes. Use it 70% of the time. Greatly reduces the stress on my work commute. NoAP on long trips. Worth more than I paid for it in my opinion!
  • edited November 2019
    The TACC and lane-keeping portions work well, and i use them all the time when I’m on a highway, and occasionally on surface streets. They will have occasional Brain farts, like slowing down for no reason on an open freeway, so I’m a good boy and keep my hands on the wheel, my feet near the pedals, and my eyes on the road so I can take over if necessary.
    NOAP, on the other hand, I don’t trust as far as I could throw the car. It does strange things, and at best is inconsiderate of other drivers; at worst it can is hazardous to them. I use it on the freeway, but it’s as stressful as sitting shotgun for a 16 year old with a learners permit.
  • edited November 2019
    Yes and yes here as well. Everyday. No worries.
  • edited November 2019
    I understand the reluctance to accept the way it works. I nearly crashed out because I thought it was wrong: it saw some oncoming traffic that was in my blind spot and it was not going to change lanes until that traffic passed. Me, OTOH, thought the way was clear and so i overrode it. Collision avoidance saved the day.

    The point is that many of us overthink what the autopilot/lane keeping software is doing. We're way smarter, but the software is much better informed - and doesn't forget the rules. You can adjust it so that you become more comfortable with the way it works, such as changing the following distance, so it will slow down and stop without making you worry about whether it will or not. That's a biggie. BUT walk before you run: don't turn on Navigate on Autopilot until you can find a four lane that's not busy and try it. I've managed to become comfortable enough with the software to drive more than 30 miles without touching the brake or accelerator, and touching the steering wheel when asked.

    The bottom line for me: it works and is probably safer than I am. And I LOVE driving the car anyway!
  • edited November 2019
    I do TACC and AP cut my fatigue on long interstate trips but I don't trust it enough to take my eyes of the road, even on Interstates and divided highways (the only roads I use it on). It won't avoid debris in the road and hitting anything larger than my fist at highway speeds would cause at minimum a blown tire.
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