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Unexpected acceleration claim process?

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  • edited November -1
    +1 GHammer, mialink and wk057

    Human error. File suit and you’ll lose.
  • edited January 9
    How much do you owe on the car?
  • edited January 9
    @Badger more than a few K. Probably close to the blue book value.
  • edited January 10
    "I experienced an unexpected acceleration event last week, ... as I eased on the accelerator pedal while pulling into a parking spot."

    Had you by any chance been using cruise control, and it was active? In many cars cruise control cannot be activated until the car is going a certain minimum speed, but I've noticed in my Model S that if cruise control had been active, but was turned off as I braked for a traffic light, pulling the stalk turned it back on even though the car had stopped.

    I've also noticed at a certain highway exit I use often with cruise control engaged, the car will first slow down dramatically and then accelerate equally dramatically. It's a situation where the exit continues straight ahead, the highway turns off to the right. I notice that the speed limit indication on the dash follows the same pattern, it seems that the car thinks the initial part of the exit has a lower speed limit which then increases as the exit becomes a street. I've learned to disengage the cruise control as I leave the highway proper, then re-engage it when I reach the street so as to avoid the erratic speed behavior in between.
  • edited January 10
    Just go through the NHTSA site. Nobody here it appears cares about the cars or the customers.

    No worries, glad you're OK.
  • edited January 10
    Great podcast regarding unintended acceleration:
    http://revisionisthistory.com/episodes/08-blame-game
  • edited January 11
    BadgerErickson

    It could also be that most of us realize how unlikely unintended acceleration really is vs pedal misapplication. I have only ran across 1 time that a truck had an issue with unintended acceleration that was able to be duplicated and if you had used the brake it stopped the acceleration and stopped the truck like normal. The cause of it was the cruise control wiring between the button and the PCM were damage and shorting to each other and would occasionally give the PCM the command to set cruise control and accelerate the truck. Just touching the brake took it out of cruise control although it may turn back on again when you released the brake. It couldn't happen under 35mph as that was the lowest speed cruise control would enable on that truck. I was able to locate the problem and could prove what caused it and say for certain that it was fixed and wouldn't happen again.

    Most of the unintended acceleration cases are pedal misapplication. The issue will always be how to prove it one way or the other. Most fly by wire TPS sensors use multiple sensors in them. Either using idle off idle switches along with the variable resistor or use multiple variable resistors with different ranges and one that works inverse of the others. That is pretty telling on a event data recorder if the 3 variable resistors shows the pedal is pushed then it is pushed. However now was it the drivers foot on the pedal or did the linkage bind or something else push the pedal. If the pedal doesn't register then you have a good case for unintended acceleration.
  • edited January 11
    kaffine

    I have nothing to do with this complaint in my vehicles.


    https://www.nhtsa.gov/

    Glad rafamis was not injured this time.
  • edited January 13
    Solution is: When turning the steering wheel it’s easy to accidentally hit the TACC lever. Car will accelerate in such case.

    Happened to me twice, but without consequence.

    This is 99.9% the reason for those “sudden accelerations”. And when you say you >turned< into that parking spot, this basically makes a 100%.
  • edited January 13
    Hey @Yodrak.

    I always leave cruise set to 'on' (as in the indicator showing a grayed out speed setting in the HUD- top left). Always set for for highway speed. It was not activated during that particular driving session, as I was driving surface roads ner home. I've never felt the need to disengage it. Good advise though.
  • edited January 13
    @soenke Doubt it. I sit as far as I can from the wheel when I driive. Personal preference. My arms are always quite extended, and my fingers have never gotten in the way of any of the stalks.
    The only issue I've ever had with Tesla stalks has been unwittingly activating the parking brakes or switching to neutral, as my other 2 vehicles have different functions on their stalks (wipers and such).
  • edited January 13
    @BadgerErickson Thanks. I filed with the NHTSA last week. If I hadn't already, your post would've been very helpful. If someone else happens on this post (doubt it though, Tesla's forum is asinine), I'm sure you'd have given them a place to start.
  • edited January 13
    @soenke, Forgot to mention, you need to be doing 18 mph for TACC to activate, according to google (I thought it was 15). I could have been driving 18 within the parking lot, but felt I was already regen braking to 9 or 10 when steering right into the parking spot. So even if accidental stalk contact ocurred should not have turned the TACC on. It would be interesting to see what the logs show in this regard.

    After giving it some thought, I cannot rule out the car briefly sensing more than 18mph as I pulled into the spot. I do drive briskly. And as I never take care in disengaging the TACC, It makes a lot of sense !!!

    You might have landed the cause of the incident.
  • edited January 13
    @soenke, Forgot to mention, you need to be doing 18 mph for TACC to activate, according to google (I thought it was 15). I could have been driving 18 within the parking lot, but felt I was already regen braking to 9 or 10 when steering right into the parking spot. So even if accidental stalk contact ocurred should not have turned the TACC on. It would be interesting to see what the logs show in this regard.

    After giving it some thought, I cannot rule out the car briefly sensing more than 18mph as I pulled into the spot. I do drive briskly. And as I never take care in disengaging the TACC, It makes a lot of sense !!!

    You might have landed the cause of the incident.
  • edited November -1
    @rafamis

    One question...

    Was your AP active at the time?
  • edited January 21
    Its funny how people here assume its not possible, when in fact its very possible.

    I have had several DC to AC converters give power unexpectedly and stick full throttle, even after years of no issue. It happens. Electronics fail. Sensors get worn, and can give false info. They have fail safes to help, but doesnt fix all scenarios. If they didnt fail, why would they have fail safes?
  • edited January 21
    eery time this has been reported, the logs have demonstrated user error
    "not an AC to DC converter suck a full power"
    But nice FUD try
  • edited January 21
    @Gold - Actually, I don't see how it is possible in the Tesla. Clearly, some parts can fail or software could have a bug, but it would require a lot of things to go wrong all at once AND the mechanical brakes to fail. Since in every instance the logs have shown pedal misapplication, there is little to debate.

    Yes, you might have some poorly designed part or custom vehicle without any safety design considerations that exhibits flawed operation. Not sure how that relates to Tesla.

    A well-designed system has multiple safety systems in place as Tesla does. With all the electronics and software, people keep forgetting the braking system is independent with a mechanical backup that can stop the car even at full throttle.
  • edited January 21
    https://www.teslarati.com/tesla-sudden-unintended-acceleration-claims-debunked/

    "We investigate every single incident where the driver alleges to us that their vehicle accelerated contrary to their input, and in every case where we had the vehicle’s data, we confirmed that the car operated as designed."
  • edited January 21
    @GoldAK47 - The issue is that in a Tesla, the accelerator pedal is monitored by two different sensors which act in opposite ways. One increases when the pedal is pressed, and one decreases. If they not agree, then the car does not drive. It is not a simple potentiometer in which a single variable resistor is used.

    So while you think you may have found the reason, you have not.
  • edited January 21
    Question for the Dunning Kruggers: Why would Tesla settle privately, if all incidents have been researched and pointed to driver error...?

    By the way, the fact that Elon is calling me a short seller makes me feel further validated. He's on the defensive and grasping at straws.
  • edited January 21
    6 of the 7 plaintiffs dropped out of the suit. Only one is hard headed enough to continue.

    Also, unless you're the one that started the petition, no one else was labeled a short seller.
  • edited January 21
    newbie mistake... I had my model s for a couple of weeks... I was making a left hand turn and hit the cruise control instead of the left turn signal... car zoomed forward...luckily I hit the brakes... scared the heck out of me... I guess my old car turn signal location is imprinted on my brain... anyway...just a cautionary tale...
  • edited January 22
    rafamis

    So have you managed to get the logs from the car yet?

    reed_lewis

    There are failures that could cause the unintended acceleration without throttle input. That is why the logs are important. If they show the sensors agree and are calling for acceleration then either the driver has his foot on the pedal or there is a mechanical issue with the pedal. However the electronics are more than capable of accelerating the car without the pedal being pushed otherwise cruise control wouldn't work. So if the pedal sensors say the pedal isn't being pushed it becomes much more difficult to sort out. It could be that cruise was still active or was activated just before and the car didn't see any obstacles.
  • edited January 22
    https://www.tesla.com/blog/no-unintended-acceleration-tesla-vehicles

    Discredited. More short BS.

    Still Grinning ;-)
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