Model 3

I need Supercharger understanding

edited November -1 in Model 3
I wish this forum had a "search" then I wouldn't have to ask a question that probably has been asked 100 times.

When a Supercharger's max charging rate is 75Kw or 150 or ???, how does one estimate how many "miles" will be loaded into the batteries, say for 1/2 hour or and hour or even 15 minutes of charging?
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Comments

  • edited November -1
    Honestly, I don't try to do the math myself. I use ABRP (abetterrouteplanner.com) and it tells me when to plug in and for how long, with starting and stopping percentages. If I'm already on the trip, I just plug in and see what it says. It will say something like "632 miles per hour....15 minutes needed to continue on your trip" and the mph changes as the charging tapers.

    I'm sure there are people who can and do do the math themselves, though.
  • edited November -1
    I see. Plug in, the car will tell me how much/how long to charge to reach the destination

    This will be my first trip and first time to use a Supercharger. I'm a little nervous.
  • edited January 2020
    Yup! As long as you have a destination entered, it will tell you how long to charge. I generally include a larger buffer because I drive faster (80-85 mph), and this time of year, you need to plan for heater use in most places as well. If possible, leave yourself about 25-35% on arrival. If it's telling you to charge to over 90% to arrive, see if there is another supercharger on the way and enter that as your destination instead. Sometimes it will plan for fewer but longer stops, and I typically prefer shorter but more frequent ones.
  • edited January 2020
    **Note- the 25-35% buffer is because you are a first-timer. As you get used to your cars' range and the trip planning, you can adjust this downward. Some really experienced people allow down to 5%.
  • edited November -1
    I never estimated that number in 4+yrs of Tesla ownership. I didn't need to.
    If you're really strapped for time, you plug in and check how you're doing on the app - walk to the car and drive out when you have enough charge.

    My answer may seem too simple, and I may come across as someone who doesn't get the question - but from my experience, you will not need to estimate charge added in a certain time window.
  • edited January 2020
    As hokiegir1 said, if you live in a cold climate keep in mind you’ll be using power to keep warm. So give yourself plenty of leeway. Personally, I don’t pay attention to what the car says, I charge to 85% most every time unless I’m close to home.
    Good luck with the guesstimations.
  • edited January 2020
    "When a Supercharger's max charging rate is 75Kw or 150 or ???, how does one estimate how many "miles" will be loaded into the batteries, say for 1/2 hour or and hour or even 15 minutes of charging?"

    it tells you on the charging screen what the miles per hour of charging is...rule of thumb is 50kW/200mph. On the screen shot below you see it is charging at 133kW which is 542mph of charging, numbers are all right there.

    https://imgur.com/LlyiPtk

    So apps like TeslaFi.com and StatsApp keep track of your charging so you see how rates vary in different charging sessions.
  • edited November -1
    The charging rate is constantly changing, so there’s no exact figuring short of being a savant. Like others have said, it’s superfluous given the car’s assistance when traveling.
  • edited November -1
    Since you mentioned searching the forum, you can enter this into your browser:

    site:forums.tesla.com (your search terms)
  • edited January 2020
    "The charging rate is constantly changing, so there’s no exact figuring short of being a savant."

    https://imgur.com/LlyiPtk
    44kW/180mph = 0.2444444

    https://imgur.com/LlyiPtk
    133kW/542mph = 0.2453874
  • edited November -1
    Idiot
  • edited January 2020
    When Tesla sees the light and starts using projected range, then we will all start to see different mph charging rates. That will be fun.
  • edited November -1
    Unfortunately, your question doesn't have a simple answer.

    If you get to a 120kw Supercharger, and most of the spaces are in use, you'll end up sharing power with someone already charging - so you may see anywhere from 30kw to 120kw when you initially plug in. Note that the amount of power going to your car will go up over time as the other car's state of charge goes up and it's charge rate goes down.

    Tesla is starting to roll out V3 Superchargers, with 250 kw charging capability. They'll go from 10-50% in about 12 minutes, but they'll slow down after that, eventually charging at the same rate as the older versions as the battery fills - https://cleantechnica.com/2019/06/24/tesla-model-3-on-supercharger-v3-adds-50-range-in-under-12-minutes-charts/

    Your car will also charge at different rates depending on it's state of charge (how "full" it is). Between about 10% and 50% SOC, you'll be able to get the maximum charge rate available. As the battery gets charged above 50%, it'll start slowing down the charge rate - if you're really bored some day, set your car to charge to 100% at the SC. Going from 90-100% may take as long as the entire rest of your charge.

    Your charging speed will also depend on the temperature - if you're driving in below-freezing temps, the car will need to heat the battery up before it will be able to charge at full rate. If you're using navigation, and the SC is on your route, the car will start heating the battery if necessary well before you get to the SC so you won't see the delay.

    All that said, my M3 LR RWD reaches about 500 miles of range added per hour of charging while it's in the 10-50% SOC range in warm temps. (Yes, "MPH" in the USA or "KPH" for the rest of the world can mean both speed as well as how fast the car is charging. ) This only lasts for about 20 minutes, adding about 160 miles of range (very approximately). If my battery was at 75% SOC, the same 20 minutes might only add 50 miles of range (a WAG).

    It's good to have a rough estimate in mind; the car will tell you if you're using navigation ("charge for 20 minutes, then continue"), or you can use an online tool. You'll quickly learn to guesstimate yourself - once you know what you're hooked up to.
  • edited January 2020
    Nota Bene: FishEV is a long time member of this forum under various pseudonyms. His contributions to this forum are generally indistinguishable from those of a troll paid by anti-Tesla interests to cause consternation here, so it's best to ignore him as much as possible.
  • edited January 2020
    On the last trip we took, the car charged before the show we watched ended.
  • edited November -1
    jallred -
    I've noticed that - what good is NetFlix if a 45 minute episode of "The Expanse" is only half over when you've got sufficient charge to continue on your journey? ;)
    (Note to the humor impaired: Yes, I know NetFlix is only available if the car is connected to WiFi, and most SC's don't have WiFi, but roll with me here...)
  • edited January 2020
    With nobody parking next to me, low soc, warm weather 140kw charger goes above 600 mph. As bighorn states takes a savant to be more precise.
  • edited January 2020
    "NetFlix if a 45 minute episode of "The Expanse""

    I thought Amazon purchased all the rights to The Expanse for Amazon Prime Video?
  • edited January 2020
    "I've noticed that - what good is NetFlix if a 45 minute episode of "The Expanse" is only half over when you've got sufficient charge to continue on your journey? ;)
    (Note to the humor impaired: Yes, I know NetFlix is only available if the car is connected to WiFi, and most SC's don't have WiFi, but roll with me here...)"

    Grandson had spent the night and we arrived at father's work to have him picked up pretty early. We were at least 10 miles from home (wifi) and we were able to watch a Netflix movie while we waited. I assumed that we were using LTE since the car was not connected to wifi.
  • edited January 2020
    There's a complex tapering of charging speed, as mentioned above, which makes the calculation beyond the realm of most without a TI-84.

    @Frank
    Get Hulu and watch Letterkenny instead. Netflix doesn't require Wifi, btw.
  • edited January 2020
    Another point is to make sure you use Tesla Naviation to the Super Chargers in cold weather. This will activate Preconditioning and you will get an alert about this probably 10-20 miles before you get to the SC.

    Preconditioning will warm up the battery so that the charging rate is optimized. A cold battery cannot charge as fast no matter what rate is available.

    If you show up to SC with cold battery, rate of charge will be reduced until battery gets to optimum temp for charging.

    As others have pointed out SuperChargers can be crowded which lowers the rate of charge. The charging rate is also slowed down as battery is charged.

    https://insideevs.com/news/349267/video-tesla-model-3-supercharging-v2-150-kw/
  • edited January 2020
    This forum is indeed searchable. In a Google search type (without quotes): "'search item' site:forums.tesla.com"
  • edited January 2020
    This forum is indeed searchable. In a Google search type (without quotes): "'search item' site:forums.tesla.com"
  • edited November -1
    Just plug your destination into your navigator. It will give you all the information you need. It will also automatically start on route battery warming as you approach the next supercharger listed in the navigator.
  • edited January 2020
    "When Tesla sees the light and starts using projected range, then we will all start to see different mph charging rates."

    You can see charging effects on your Projected (actual) range in the car's Energy graph. While the graph does not move when the car is not moving the Projected Range number will update as you charge. I always have that up if I'm in for a quick get home charge as Projected Range will tell me how much charge I need to get home.
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