General

Tesla Forums are now read only. To continue the conversation with the Tesla community visit engage.tesla.com.

Solar Roof Progression (UPDATE 5/19)

1356712

Comments

  • edited March 2020
    It had solar irradiance which is perfect because i can just calculate that with the amount of energy i produce. Wont be perfect, but i'll show how much irradiance im able to convert to kWh.
  • edited March 2020
    In your break even analysis did you account for the interest costs on the loan?
  • edited November -1
    Will add break even period for financing.
  • edited March 2020
    MAy I ask a few questions
    Can the tiles be walked on to maintain the home? If so, does the system need to be shut down while workers are on the tiles? Any special precautions that must be taken while on the tiles?
  • edited March 2020
    @derotam

    Added both break-in periods. Had to delete some filler garbage i kept getting access denied.

    @rm760

    I'll make sure to ask that question, its a good point.
  • edited March 2020
    @rm760 - Yep, tiles can be walked on. At one point there were 7 workers on my roof walking all over the tiles near completion when doing the finished work with metal flashings. They are very sturdy. No need to turn off the system either. The only precaution I'm aware of is they are a bit slippery when wet. I'd avoid walking on it when wet, although they are not smooth either - so there is some friction.
  • edited March 2020
    "It had solar irradiance which is perfect because i can just calculate that with the amount of energy i produce. Wont be perfect, but i'll show how much irradiance im able to convert to kWh."

    How much solar power your specific install should generate should have been part of your proposal. Did Tesla not analyze the install and provide that information?
  • edited March 2020
    read my op and you'll stumble upon it
  • edited March 2020
    "Read my op and you'll stumble upon it"

    Saw that which is why your question on how to calculate it using the averages in the data links we provided didn't make sense. Tesla should have provided some nice graphics on solar production by month based on that data and done all the work. You might want to ask them for copies of their worksheet which will have the information you asked about.
  • edited March 2020
    They gave me an estimated annual kWh production. Im not sure what you dont understand.
  • edited March 2020
    "They gave me an estimated annual kWh production"

    And should have given you monthly with graphics and data showing your net energy usage each month. In order to get a yearly kWh output, Tesla should have done this study for you unless they just applied a simple percentage vs. a detailed study of your install. Since you want the information, you should ask Tesla for it as they should have done it already.
  • edited March 2020
    Show me where they it would indicate that they should have 'given me monthly with graphics and data showing your net energy usage each month'.

    Additionally, "Since you want the information, you should ask Tesla for it as they should have done it already."

    You are not reading, understanding, and fundamentally missing the point of why i am even doing this. Never once did i indicate that i want Tesla to provide this info for me, that was never the intent either. You're welcome to show me where you think i said this.
  • edited March 2020
    "Show me where they it would indicate that they should have 'given me monthly with graphics and data showing your net energy usage each month'."

    Pointing out that to give you an accurate estimate on the power generated by your system, they needed to do a detailed analysis based on solar data (the links provided above), location, angle, efficiency and this is typically done by month and showing your usage based on the yearly HVAC bills you gave them to do that analysis. The two bids I got both had it.

    I would hope Tesla does that for each install also.

    My suggestion is you ask them for that data vs. trying to do it yourself as there are many variables.
  • edited March 2020
    My utility bills i gave them have nothing to do with the amount of energy the solar roof will generate.

    I was given an annual estimate. What are you getting yourself worked up about. I am recording this data and releasing it free to the public to view so that people can see the real world numbers for my geographical area. I might do something similar with cybertruck just because i can.
  • edited March 2020
    And also now that i think about it, Why are you telling me what Tesla should have done, if you didnt order the roof? Mr. Non-owner, how are you in a position to be telling me what Tesla should have done for the product you didnt buy.

    Ha!
  • edited March 2020
    @TeslaTap.com
    Thanks for answering my questions
  • edited March 2020
    @andy.connor.e - "Mr. Non-owner"

    I got a good laugh out of that one, thanks for that.
  • edited March 2020
    nice
  • edited March 2020
    "Why are you telling me what Tesla should have done"

    Because you were asking questions that Tesla should have answered in any basic workup on your installation. It looks like you are going to try and do it yourself which is hard as you have no info on the many variables.

    Just ask for the data they used for the kWh expected yearly output. They had to do some kind of study. Hopefully the nice Monthly Generation/Usage with yearly breakeven points that most installers provide.
  • edited March 2020
    What questions did i ask?
  • edited March 2020
    "Mr. Non-owner, how are you in a position to be telling me what Tesla should have done for the product you didnt buy."

    Had my 8.13 kWp system from 2015. PV is pretty much a commodity. 32.36 MWh of solar experience. Kind of like having EV experience or not.
  • edited March 2020
    Yep and its not a Tesla Solar Roof.

    Please show me where i asked the questions you put in my mouth.
  • edited November -1
    "Yep and its not a Tesla Solar Roof."

    PV glass and panels are commodities. It's old mature tech. Most of the innovation in PV has been in the inverters with SolarEdge being one of top. Tesla offers four different mfgs. inverters and lists SolarEdge first. You should pick SolarEdge if you they let you choose.

    SolarEdge's app for tracking everything is the bomb. I wonder if Tesla will force you to use their app vs. Solar Edges.
  • edited November -1
    Interesting that you try to argue your way out of it. and not tell me where i asked questions that i didnt ask
  • edited March 2020
    FWIW: maximum roof angle allowed is 45 degrees
Sign In or Register to comment.