Model S

Very disappointed

edited November -1 in Model S
I am so upset with my P85DL. I have really enjoyed my Tesla and been a big cheerleader of the brand. I'm hurting now.

65,000 miles not a lot of miles, but charging is now very slow at a supercharger. Hard to take on a trip now.
My big screen will not come on - it went black permanently, reset will not fix it
My car is very slow to start - takes several minutes then I have to press the brake 2-3-4-5 times and pray.
I have stopped driving for fear it will strand me.
The nearest service center is 350 miles away, car might not make it that far, so.
I can't get service on the phone.
I must schedule online.
I want to ask about a Ranger if they can replace the computer and screen, versus hiring a transporter to come and get the car if a Ranger cannot fix it. I need to ask questions to see what I need to do.
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Comments

  • edited February 5
    You need a new MCU and a ranger can do it. Two came 750 miles to fix mine a few weeks ago. Scheduled with the app. Requested a ranger. Car is better than new and got an LTE upgrade in the process.
  • edited November -1
    Schedule the appointment, they'll instruct you from there. As with all things Tesla, they want a commitment before talking to you. New orders, service, anything, have to book/reserve/schedule online FIRST, then they'll deal with you as appropriate for your situation.

    Always schedule first, complain later!
  • edited November -1
    As they said, schedule with the app. Tesla will take it from there. They will even talk to the car to see what it needs. In your case the car won't respond and they will know you are right about the MCU.
  • edited February 6
    I’m in the same situation. 2015 85d. 68k miles MCU went out. Waiting on service soonest available appointment is 2/11 told repair cost to be $3k
  • edited November -1
    This is why we upgraded last year - the MCU thing scared us. Given that it is a known design error (the firmware electronics can't handle the number of read/writes after a period), and something that is eventually going to impact all (pre-Raven/3?) Teslas, this should be a recall. Expensive, yes, but the right thing to do. Hell, VW bought our son's '10 VW Jetta diesel back in 2017 with 100k miles for at least 2x market value ($14k for a car we bought for $22k new).
  • edited February 6
    "it is a known design error (the firmware electronics can't handle the number of read/writes after a period), and something that is eventually going to impact all (pre-Raven/3?) Teslas, this should be a recall."

    I wonder, is it a design error or is it a wear item, like windshield wipers, tires, and brakes? True, a significant difference is that the part is soldered in and can't be replaced independent of the whole MCU.

    On the other hand, electronics parts either die quickly and get replace under warranty or last a long time but still have to be replaced and don't qualify as a recall because things do have a lifetime. Electronics parts usually have new and better versions available on a shorter cycle than their lifetime, i.e. the replacement part is better than the original.
  • edited February 6
    Is the jostling of the CPU causing these CPU's to go out? Will the second CPU last 65K for the same reasons?

    A new battery costs about 15 grand I think my Model S charges slow on a supercharger. As a result, I don't feel good about my Tesla. What is the tech on this? Is something wrong? Did Tesla slow it down on an update? The charging speed is the same at home. What happened?
  • edited February 6
    Yodrak. | February 5, 2020
    True, a significant difference is that the part is soldered in and can't be replaced independent of the whole MCU.

    Soldered parts CAN be removed/replaced. It's just not easy. Two ways to do it (I'm assuming it's not a SMT chip):
    1. Cut each pin from the body of the chip, then unsolder each pin, one by one.
    2. Create a custom tool that makes contact with each pin at the same time, heat, apply solder wick, and remove.

    This seems to be one from the Apple playbook - when a part component (eg., battery) dies, throw away the item and buy a new one.

    And contrary to Teslatap's comment about this being a rare problem, there are lots of reports on TMC.
  • edited November -1
    @flight505 "I think my Model S charges slow on a supercharger. As a result, I don't feel good about my Tesla. What is the tech on this? Is something wrong? Did Tesla slow it down on an update? The charging speed is the same at home. What happened?"

    After the Asian battery fires last summer, Tesla sent an update that lowered the peak supercharge rate for the original version batteries (pre-100's). They have also tightened up the temperature control for the batteries that lowers the supercharge and regen levels for cold batteries.
  • edited February 6
    "it is a known design error (the firmware electronics can't handle the number of read/writes after a period), and something that is eventually going to impact all (pre-Raven/3?) Teslas, this should be a recall."

    Has such a design error happened on other makes of cars?

    Is the "firmware electronics" outside the CPU? If so, why do I have to buy a new CPU? This is expensive. Who is responsible for the firmware electronics? Is this the hardware with which Tesla installed the CPU?

    These CPU problems do not address my battery issues. Correct? I paid far more money 5 years ago for this P85DL than a new P100DL costs today. To feel good about owning this car and owning a Tesla, I need a good battery and a good CPU. I think I've paid enough money to be taken care of for design flaws. If not, I can buy another electric car marque later on and for now go back to driving a gas car, which I don't want to do, but the slow battery charging makes this car much less viable for trips, I don't trust it and don't want to drive with the "I might get stranded" feeling I am experiencing.
  • edited February 6
    Agreening with GHammer. Your car is supercharging slow because Tesla slowed it down via update. This is un-acceptable. Lots on folks on the same boat. I now have to take my ICE car on longer trips because charging is too slow.
  • edited November -1
    The slow charging situation seems to have been applied to the 85s and down. My P90D is still charging the same as the day I got it as a CPO.

    The MCU replacement is 2200, not 3k, miked.

    Flight, cars have issues, tesla vehicles are not invincible.
  • edited November -1
    @GHammer - Not sure I'm an outlier, but around the September update, my Supercharging has gone up a lot on my 2016 S75. Used to be limited to 85-95 kW and I got 122 kW in November. I started at a low SOC and had a paired stall to myself. This was after driving 150 miles, so the battery was already warm. Temps were about 60F. So there may be some combinations that do better than before, and others that do worse.

    @flight505 - The flash memory for code and other data is on a board made by Nvidia. It has the CPU, flash memory and RAM. All items are soldered in, as the severe vehicle environment requires soldering parts rather than using sockets, or you'd have endless problems. As far as I can tell, the Nvidia board is out of production and you can't buy the board Tesla uses. As is common with all auto manufacturers, they don't do part swaps at service - they replace the entire module and in some cases, ship it back for repair and enter into refurb stock.

    I'm not ready to call it a design error, as the parts function as designed. It may have been the best available back in 2009/2010 when it was designed in. All the additional features over the years may have contributed to some of the issues we see today. It's unclear how many owners are having the problem. There are about 330,000 cars with MCU1. Still, it sucks if your MCU fails outside warranty.
  • edited February 6
    Also, my friends with Tesla vehicles say I'm not sympathetic to their vehicle issues at over 150k miles. :)

    Should I be hugging and holding their hand after 150k miles?
  • edited November -1
    "I’m in the same situation. 2015 85d. 68k miles MCU went out."
    106K miles here, 2015 70D. Still working fine. Supercharging still >100kW.
  • edited February 7
    TT, wasn't their a report or confirmation by one of the EV magazines (I think it quoted Jason Hughes saying) Tesla had stated they reduced the logging and read/write to the eMMC recently? So many of those 330,000+ cars will are less likely to reach that failure point.
  • edited February 7
    Does $2200 cover the travel expenses (or mileage) of the mobile service? Tesla charges $175 per hour, I believe.

    Will a new CPU restore supercharging rate?
  • edited February 7
    Unlikely, newer MCU replacement has nothing to do with the HV battery.
  • edited February 7
    What warrants a battery replacement under warranty, which is 8 years and unlimited miles?

    Tesla won't replace it due to slow supercharging, so my discontent is not going away.

    Later model batteries have different chemistry - by are stukk the 18650s, correct?
  • edited February 7
    Supercharging will stay the same after mcu replacement.

    2200 covers everything.

    Chemistry has changed over the years
  • edited November -1
    Rangers don’t charge for transit, even from 750 miles away. Sales tax bumped my total just over $2000 3 weeks ago.
  • edited February 7
    Yodrak it's a design issue. They didn't account for the amount of read write cycles when they selected the BOM(bill of materials). They also didn't perform sufficient Monte Carlo methodology and HALT(Highly accelerated life testing) to catch the failure during development. It happens. But the issue is 10x worse with automotive applications. It's a lesson learned and they'll get passed this. But any cars with the old parts should be recalled and fixed in good faith.
  • edited February 7
    Offering a discount to MCU1 owners who want to trade their cars would also be a good way to make it right.
  • edited November -1
    "Tesla won't replace it due to slow supercharging, so my discontent is not going away."

    The actual overall charge time isn't that much longer, 20%-80%, which is a typical road trip charge cycle, is only 7 minutes longer. There are plenty of us who still do long road trips just fine.
  • edited February 7
    "wasn't their a report" - there. My redneck-cracker hillbilly past leaks through my makeup too often - ya'll
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