Model 3

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1 to 2 months parts wait time?

edited November -1 in Model 3
On February 27th I was hit by a red jeep that 4an a red light and did not stop. The police are still presumably looking for the individual and vehicle. The car has substantial damage but I am hoping it will be repaired. It is only 7 months old. The insurance company say there is await of between 1 to 2 months for any parts. Is that correct? That would mean I would not have a car after my rental coverage expires after 30 days.

Comments

  • edited November -1
    If the other driver is at fault they are responsible for rental coverage for as long as it takes.
  • edited November -1
    Oops, hit and run, bummer.
  • edited February 2020
    There may be a long wait for some parts but definitely not "any" parts. The shop will be able to give you a better idea of what is involved.
  • edited November -1
    First things first, schedule a tear down estimate at a Tesla approved collision center. That will give you an idea of the wait time involved for many questions.

    The wait to schedule a service might be longer than the wait for the parts. Start looking for Tesla approved shops that have an opening to work on your car, it might be a challenge in some areas.
  • edited February 2020
    I don’t know where you’re located but I’m in Portland. My car was rear-ended on Dec 12. I got it to a certified Tesla body shop within 2 days. Unfortunately the accident caused something to go wrong with the 12 volt battery system so they had to order parts for that in order to move the car inside to do a tear down. Those parts took 2 weeks. After tear down, all parts (65 different parts) took between 2-3 weeks. There were no parts back ordered at all. That’s the good news. The bad news is that it is so labor intensive. I still don’t have my car back yet and don’t expect it for another month. But another good part is they are so precise in the repairs that it’s done just like rebuilding on the car assembly line. Good luck.
  • edited February 2020
    If you're asking for advice, I'd go ahead and put in an order for a new car while you're waiting for your answer. Worst case you're out $250. My last car was totaled in an accident and the other driver was at fault (rear-ended while sitting at a stop light - kid was doing about 30mph when he hit me.) I took it to a Tesla approved repair center the next day and they told me pretty much right off that it was likely to be totaled. They said they're totaling out Model 3's with only $15k damage because the insurance companies are able to recover a substantial amount at auction. I placed my order the next day and it took 6 weeks for delivery. In the meantime, the repair estimate came out to $22k and sure enough it was totaled. Price on the car went up $1500 during that time but I was already locked in at the lower price.
  • edited February 2020
    Looking at the video and the photos I took the damage seems to be mostly panels, rear passenger side door and the wheel is slightly dented. The car still had power and the recovery truck driver was able to move it by driving the car. There did not seem to be any odd noises either or leaks of any fluids. I am trying to stay positive as I love my little TARDIS.
  • edited November -1
    Depends on the parts, probably. My experience end of last year was parts delivery within a week of the Tesla approved body shop ordering them. Unfortunately they ordered parts three times because they didn’t do a thorough estimate up front.
  • edited February 2020
    I hope you find a good Tesla certified body shop. My Model 3 was hit last year and the repair process and wait for parts was a nightmare. The closest body shop was 2 hours away and they claimed to work on Tesla's all the time. But they did a terrible repair, added paint imperfections, forgot to connect some wiring, scratched plastic panels, dirty finger prints on the headliner and didn't replace parts that should have been replaced. My car will never be the same. I had to take it back to them several times, and after finding even more issues I refused to let them touch my car again. Then there was the process of trying to get my deductible and car rental expenses back. You never get all of your deductible back, or the gas for the rental car, really sucks when the accident isn't your fault.
  • @Resist- it sounds like the body shop that worked on your M3 deserves to lose their Tesla certification. Did you complain to Tesla about your issues? If not, you should.
  • edited November -1
    I already told the insurance to send it to one if the two Tesla owned repair centers relatively close by.
  • edited June 2020
    Update: 15 weeks and 2 days later I finally got the car back. The repairs cost were over $16K. Fortunately the insurance covered all but my co pay.
  • edited June 2020
    Dang. Going to check my insurance for how long they cover the car rental. Usually it’s 30 days.
  • edited November -1
    @azbrit what did you do about alternate transportation while you waited?
  • edited June 2020
    My rental lasted a whole 30 days. Fortunately I had my haz guzzling F150 to fall back on but spend close a $1000.00 on gas. Because I get free charging at work normally it costs me around $250.00 to run it during that length of time. And that's a major part of why it was purchased in the first place.
  • edited November -1
    @azbrit | June 15, 2020 My rental lasted a whole 30 days."

    I think that is normal and it's not the insurance company being tricky, more that 99% of cars are fixed in 30 days.
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