Model 3

Phone Key doesn't work without App running?!?!?!?

135

Comments

  • edited June 23
    I really appreciated the simplicity of the FOB when i had a loaner Model S for a few days a while back. Currently I use the key card in thin wallet for the Model 3. Unlocking the door with the card also allows driving without having to re-tap your wallet by center console as long as you put car in gear in some timely fashion.

    I'll probably get the FOB anyway at some point.
  • edited June 23
    Glad to know Tesla offers a fob for those who prefer it. My personal experience with the phone is great and I prefer not carrying anything else. My house locks are also phone activated. No idea why Howard thinks this makes me a protectionist, raving Tesla fanatic.
  • ATJATJ
    edited June 23
    I'm confused. I can unlock and drive my car using my iPhone as a key WITHOUT the Telsa app running.
  • edited June 23
    @ATJ: The Tesla app doesn’t have to be running in the foreground, but background app refresh needs to be enabled.
  • edited June 23
    Each to their own. As a rabid Tesla lunatic who happily shoots down anyone who dare utter a word against Lord Elon and his army of truthgivers, I was merely pointing out that the fob is NOT a necessity, as was indicated by some posters. Some may consider it a personal benefit but it is NOT for all.
  • edited June 23
    Just curious if the phone as a key is 100% reliable as claimed by some then why did Tesla feel it necessary to offer the passive fob?

    What exactly is the car/phone problem with those that don’t find it reliable? Besides that we are lying trolls looking to take Tesla down.

    When I had the HW3 upgrade installed I had the service technician go through all the phone settings. His comment was there were lots of complaints and to use the fob. Since I just spent 3 reliable days with a Model S I dipped into savings to cover the $150 cost of the passive fob.

    I don’t think anyone prefers to carry an extra fob in their pocket if their phone is 100% reliable. I know I would not. Glad yours is 100% reliable.

    Still have no idea why this is such a big issue to the fanatics, but that is always the case.
  • edited June 23
    It’s called an accessory. They made it for people like you who feel more secure with it. I’m over the moon that you’re satisfied with it. If it was necessary, they’d supply everyone with one.
  • edited June 23
    Its not 100% reliable. You can search the forums and there are threads from 2-3 years ago with problems connecting. They do not work perfectly for everyone, and this is a literal fact. If yours happens to work, great. My personal opinion, is that i dont feel like ever dealing with the days that my phone does not work properly. All it does is make the phone that much more important, and rely that much more on it working 100% of the time.

    Phones being not modular, cannot replace battery, only get 2 years of software updates, they are a cesspool of planned obsolescence.
  • edited June 23
    A thought to ponder.... according to Howard, and I don’t doubt him, the passive fob is 100% reliable. Designed and implemented by Tesla. 100% of its operation is controlled by Tesla. For someone who has problems with the phone as key.... who has the most control over the phone functionality?
  • edited June 23
    @lbowroom

    the FOB gets built and connected to the car and its done. Tesla app has to run on your phone, with your settings, with your phone's bugs, bugs with other apps running, and the Tesla app itself, across bluetooth. Many more areas of potential failure when using the phone app.
  • edited June 23
    “ Its not 100% reliable” yet somehow I’ve been able to drive it every day

    “ Phones being not modular, cannot replace battery, only get 2 years of software updates, they are a cesspool of planned obsolescence.”

    I replace mine annually. Like everyone else, I Also have 2 passive access cards as backup
  • edited June 23
    Glad you can justify spending $1000 every year on a new phone. You're not really helping your case by acknowledging that. They are full of bugs, and require constant maintenance to keep the software and app running smoothly. How many updates does the FOB get?
  • edited June 23
    Keep in mind @andy.connnor.e doesn't own or drive a Tesla and has no experience or knowledge of how the Tesla app works or not with Tesla. He apparently has no knowledge or experience with any car that uses phone as key so his comments are not knowledge or fact based.

    Since any Model 3 owner needs to have the card key with them due to phone issues/car issues, there's really no advantage to the phone as key. The card as key, needing to be physically swiped is not as good as the S/X FOB that works 100% and provides true security of locking and unlocking.

    Making the keyless FOB as small as possible is the best solution. An upgrade that Tesla should have done for the Model Y among many others.
  • edited June 23
    Advantage to the phone key is the app functions like auto locking and unlocking so you dont need to reach in your pocket and click a button. Advantage for a key FOB is its independent from reliance on multiple entities to maintain the stability of their software. To each their own. I would probably have both, because the walk up unlock function would be as useful as having a FOB in case your phone decides to not work, but im not one to walk away from my car trusting the phone locked properly without looking back to check.
  • edited June 23
    “ Since any Model 3 owner needs to have the card key with them due to phone issues/car issues, there's really no advantage to the phone as key”

    Not once have I had to pull the card out of my wallet to get in and drive. Even if occasionally someone has to 1 in a 100 times, how is it not an advantage the other 99?
  • edited June 23
    it is an advantage, each person has their own preferences and levels of comfort.
  • edited June 23
    Phones are a welcome part of most peoples lives. If you don’t like them, there’sa wonderful accessory called the passive fob you can buy. I heard they work great. Everyone happy without having to chastise Tesla for offering a solution for everyone?
  • edited June 23
    lbowroom, I would think the average owner who has a 100% reliable phone as key function would not bother to come onto this thread to bash others who have problems with their phone as a key. Yet you and others simply can't help yourself. Oh no! there is a thread that is casting negativity towards Tesla. I must respond that my phone as a key is 100% reliable. There is nothing wrong with your Tesla. It is your inability to use your phone properly. You must be an idiot and fool to need to spend $150 for a 100% reliable Telsa made passive fob. You get all defensive when it is even a Tesla solution. I am so sorry for your fears. Honestly, you must be miserable.

    DO YOU ACTUALLY HEAR YOURSELF.
  • edited June 23
    I think this has been beaten to death on multiple threads on multiple forums. My case was typical. When I got my 2020 M3SR+ it worked for a while, then stopped. I tried all the solutions short of “from scratch” with no satisfaction - once the car went to sleep I had to bring the app to the foreground to make it work.

    My solution was to delete everything - forget the phone from the car, delete the app from the phone, and start from scratch, remembering to enable the Tesla app for background update. Once I did that, it began to work and has worked flawlessly since March or April.

    Now my only complaints are
    1. The phone keeps pestering me about the Tesla app using my location when not “in use,” even after I tell it to allow always - that’s Apple’s fault
    2. The app forgets my account password on a roughly bi-monthly basis - I’m pretty sure that’s Tesla’s fault - none of my other apps forget my password unless I update the apps - then it’s about 50/50 if they forget.
  • edited June 23
    I believe the iOS 12 to 13 update may be implicated in my app key issues. If you use an iPhone and you update your iOS, definitely expect problems and expect to have to delete and start from scratch.
  • edited June 23
    @AmokTime

    1. The phone keeps pestering me about the Tesla app using my location when not “in use,” even after I tell it to allow always - that’s Apple’s fault
    2. The app forgets my account password on a roughly bi-monthly basis - I’m pretty sure that’s Tesla’s fault - none of my other apps forget my password unless I update the apps - then it’s about 50/50 if they forget.

    Actually both are those are the apps fault, flaws in the code or bad design in the code.

    The problem with the phone working inconsistently is it will not work at the wrong times. Mine didn't lock the car one night and that was the night our street had the midnight door checkers. They walk down the parked cars checking for unlock and then ransack them for valuables. Somewhat polite as all they took was loose cash and an old iphone but left all my hospital badges.
  • edited June 23
    Truly amazing how one person can be an expert on every single topic in existence. With that vast superiority of knowledge you would think their time could be better spent than trolling the Tesla forum fanboys. /s
  • edited June 23
    @AmokTime that was not meant for you. The bogus post was flagged away :)
  • edited June 23
    Howard, my post acknowledges your concern and Tesla provided a fob for people like you. You report that’s it’sa perfect solution. Why do you continue to complain about me and Tesla on this topic?

    Fish, the phone doesn’t send a signal for the car to lock. If walk away lock is set it locks on its own when you leave the car with the phone. The scenario you claim happened could only happen if you left a phone in the car or used a profile that didn’t have walk away lock enabled.
  • edited June 23
    Or if you left a door ajar.
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