Model 3

Model 3 Battery Degradation 6% first year, 37,000 miles

edited June 16 in Model 3
Bjorn Nyland ran some tests on 14 month old Model 3 and came up a 6% battery degradation.

"The short answer is that after 14 months and 60,000 km (37,300 miles) the car lost some 6% of the battery capacity (although some 2% might be related to a previous software update)."

https://insideevs.com/news/428880/tesla-model-3-battery-degradation-test/

Nyland uses fast DC charging 64% of the time.

His degradation pretty much matches mine, on the same curve, with mine at 11 months and 25,000 miles and showing 5% degradation averaging between TeslaFI.com measures, 4.3%

https://imgur.com/y9IFMFm

And StatsApp's 6%.

https://imgur.com/hXnUjwH
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Comments

  • edited June 16
    Trade it in and get a new one.
  • edited June 16
    Nyland and I are both worst case scenarios with a lot of miles, a lot of large per-cent discharges and a lot of fast DC charging.
  • edited June 16
    2.5yrs and almost 70k miles on my car. The car hasn’t seen any loss in usable range - zero.
  • edited June 16
    Lot of miles—lol.
  • edited November -1
    Drove 1600 miles round trip and could care less what my degradation. There are plenty superchargers in USA.
  • edited June 16
    You know what the best part about this thread OP post is? The battery health is being measured in Estimated Range. Dont measure battery health by kWh capacity, which is actually what is degrading. Use the estimated range to judge it.

    Well done.
  • edited June 16
    @vmulla | June 15, 2020 2.5yrs and almost 70k miles on my car."

    There are reports of physics defying cars out there.
  • edited June 16
    "Bighorn | June 15, 2020
    Lot of miles—lol."

    That was my first reaction :)
  • edited November -1
    @WW, yes yes and yes. Most of the time I’m charging at home, so this isn’t an issue…driving on road trips with the supercharger network, this isn’t an issue.
  • edited June 16
    We're taking steps back trying again to say that batteries store range. Battery degradation is not measured in estimated range. Its measured in kWh capacity of the battery.
  • edited June 16
    Andy, no shit. Even if a car would lose 10% of its battery capacity you would still be able to travel in Long range model 3.
  • edited June 16
    You bet.

    Thread Flagged.
  • edited June 16
    [email protected] Have you measured the battery capacity? That's the only measurement that matters. Bjorn is using a OBDII adapter which is giving him fairly precise battery measurements. His charging history is highly abnormal, 62% SC vs the normal 10% SC. I'd be curious to know what your battery capacity is at 70K miles.
  • edited June 16
    I’d love to see fish post a picture of an odometer reading anywhere in the ballpark of what he posted, with the car name FISHEV in the shot.
  • edited June 16
    What was interesting was the confirmed accuracy of TeslaFI.com and StatsApp on measuring battery degradation. They are a good guide.
  • edited June 16
    Bjorn uses the "Scan My Tesla app. Here is a short video on DC charging causing degradation faster than AC charging from the developer who developed the "Scan My Tesla" app and the home "DataLogger". He uses DC superchargers 100% of the time because he has free lifetime supercharging.

    In his own words he's proven that the conjecture that DC charging causes faster degradation is "bullshit".

  • edited November -1
    Interesting

    I lost 18% when they installed new software in January
  • edited June 16
    His degradation pretty much matches mine, on the same curve, with mine at 11 months and 25,000 miles and showing 5% degradation averaging between TeslaFI.com measures, 4.3%

    https://imgur.com/y9IFMFm

    And StatsApp's 6%.

    What was interesting was the confirmed accuracy of TeslaFI.com and StatsApp on measuring battery degradation. They are a good guide. — all jack

    Either you don’t know what accuracy means or you don’t know what good means. Individually, one is off by 20% and the other by 14% (assuming the correct answer was 5%). Even worse, one was high and one low. The spread was over 33% of the “actual” number.

    Two apps use the same info to estimate the same number with very different results. They don’t agree on the calculation. They are doing different calculations on numbers from the car that are estimates themselves of range, and usable soc. None of this is a true measurement of degradation.

    When your facts actually destroy your own hypothesis, you should quit.
  • edited November -1
    Interesting

    I lost 18% when they installed new software in January Ortho

    No. Software doesn’t effect degradation of the battery. You lost 18% of estimated range, Not the same as degradation.

    In that software update you may have gained 1 year of battery life. Or gotten improved performance. Or they may have screwed up a software calculation and you will get it back in the future. Or they might have been calculating it wrong ibefore and fixed it to a more realistic number. You have to assume that the number before the update was “correct”. And you have no idea.
  • edited June 16
    My guess o meter shows 300 miles on 100% charge after the trip. And Betterrouteplanner shows readings of usable battery 73.6 kWh or 1.9 % degradation. Almost 7k miles on the car. Am I worried? Nope. I have 8 years and 120k to go.
  • edited June 16
    Some 60% of people dont read past the headlines. So this thread is sitting at the top so people can read the headline. Flag it away.
  • Battery degradation non-existent on my Model 3 after 60,000km.
    I really do think if you follow recommended charging practice, as outlined by Tesla, you should not have any discernible loss of charge range. A friend of mine has loss on his Model S, but that is because he lives in a Condo with no chargers, travels for his job (Sales Rep) and so, superchargers are his sole “fill up” places. If you stress your battery by frequent repetitive max level charging at superchargers, you will see a visible loss in range after a while...no question. But then, so will you see the wear and tear in your ICE vehicle. Just look at repair frequencies and cost of.
    To conclude, range loss depends how you drive.
  • Fish said that energy graph is most accurate range. Mine was showing average past 30 miles to be 162 miles on 50% battery. Sweet
  • > @Lazar1944 said: > Battery degradation non-existent on my Model 3 after 60,000km.”

    That would be quite an outlier in Li-on tech batteries.
  • I took delivery of my 2020 M3 SR+ in December. At the time of delivery they supercharged it until it said charging complete and total mileage at that point was as 230. Currently when fully charged I am getting an estimated range of 230-235. I recently took the car in for a checkup and they said the battery was fine, when I mentioned that when selling the cars they say the SR+ is guaranteed a min of 250miles the tech then said that they can see that I normally charge the car right after a drive and that I should wait at least one hour before charging. So lately I’ve been scheduling the charge to start one hour after I park the car but after two weeks there is no difference. Regardless of it being estimated or not Tesla advertises a range and most people base the purchase on that range depending on their everyday lives. So this is something that needs to be fixed.
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