Model S

Navigation System update

edited November -1 in Model S
How can I update the navigation system my 2017 P100D?
It does not recognize road changes which occurred within the past 2 years.
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Comments

  • edited June 25
    Is you car connected to WiFi? That is the best way to get updates (Both software and maps)
  • edited June 26
    I just did my map update...full wifi signal, took many hours.
  • edited November -1
    Aerodyne - When you say you "did" it, did you request it somrehow or did it just happen to update?
  • edited June 26
    @Tin...first we'd need to know what version of navigation you are presently running. The latest is Nav: 2020.12.11866 .
    You can find what your vehicle is running in the SOFTWARE screen in your car on the UI. Next, you'll need a very strong Wifi connection to download this massive data dump. The 2017 vehicles are relegated to 2.4G Wifi unless you've done an MCU2 upgrade. 2.4 G means a wider range of Wifi, but less data transfer per second. So if you do your regular OTA updates lets say in your garage and the strength of the Wifi signal is less that 5 bars, your vehicle will struggle to do the navigation download. 3 to 4 bars will suffice for the OTA update (less data transfer) without Nav upgrade, but trying a Nav update will be iffy. Put a Wifi extender in your garage to make the signal as strong as possible.
    With an MCU2 upgrade, the vehicle goes to a 5G protocol and that allows greater data transfer per second but sacrafices the range it will extend to; making the strength of signal just as important if not more.

    I repurposed an older Linksys router and hard wired it in my garage back to the modem to "extend" the range of my providers Wifi signal because I have other devices such as cameras and Alexa at that end of my home that suffered from signal strength.
  • edited June 26
    @tln2629: If the map is not showing road changes, a navigation update won’t fix that. The map comes from Google. The navigation data in the car is GPS data used for navigation.

    Check Google Maps on your computer or mobile device and see if the roads are incorrect there. If so, report the issue to Google. There’s a way to do that directly from Google Maps.
  • edited June 26
    Looks like a few more lines of code needed in the nav/camera link. Last year Minnesota / and I assume some other states / raised a high percentage of state highway speed limits from 55mph to 60mph. I noticed that as I hum along at 60 the nav/camera doesn't link the "60 MPH" roadway signage onto the driver annunciator panel (da-dashboard) and "55 MPH" and the Nav-system limits the attainable forward-speed to like 57MPH during navigational route/lane following. Hey there software peoples please B fixing this. /s/da-WileyFlier
  • edited June 26
    @jbyanda2016: The car doesn't read speed limit signs currently, so the speed limits come from the GPS/navigation data. If you're using AP on the highway, you're not limited by the speed limit.
  • edited November -1
    AP1 cars read speed limit signs
  • edited June 27
    @barrykmd: That’s right, but I assumed the post was about a newer car because it wasn’t reading signs.
  • edited November -1
    And AP1 cars car often misread signs. You really shouldn't go 80 mph on the 80 freeway here in California. AP1 cars in Europe often pick up a max speed sign printed on the back of trucks as the speed limit and go far lower than the car speed limit.

    Database design is not perfect either but can get better. Ideally, a merge of sign-readings and the use of a database might be the best solution. Then again there may be patents that prevent Tesla from using sign reading as this was done by Mobileye, which is no longer used by Tesla.
  • edited June 27
    @TeslaTap: I think Tesla intends to add speed limit sign reading, since this would be required for true FSD. The database doesn't get updated in real time. I would expect that only HW3+ cars would get sign reading.
  • edited June 27
    @EVRider - I agree, but sign reading by itself needs far better processing than what Mobileye did. HW3 should have the power needed. Still, a database sanity check would be wise. A couple of times I've come across a defaced speed limit sign - 55 was changed to 85 in one case I saw. Some logic can filter these kinds of issues such as the maximum speed limit in a state. There are also plenty of areas where the speed limit sign is obscured by greenery or trucks in traffic are between you and the sign. In those cases, a database may be required to know of a speed change at a specific GPS spot.
  • edited June 28
    @TeslaTap: I totally agree, wasn’t suggesting that the car should only use signs. I think HW1 used both GPS data and visual data.

    I’m curious to know how Tesla handles discrepancies between visual and GPS. In your example of the defaced sign, you would want the car to ignore the visual data, but if there was a temporary speed limit change due to construction, you want to ignore the GPS. Not sure how the car decides which data wins.
  • edited June 28
    @EVRider - good question actually. It probably has to fail safe to the lower value, but could probably have a confidence level that would allow it to avoid having to fail safe in many normal scenarios. For construction, I would have thought it would work lower the confidence in the map data (and go more with the posted signs) when the car identifies cones or other markers. But today our cars see fire hydrants as orange cones. So they need to improve that too and then they should be able to figure out things like, "this is a construction zone, speed limit signs get a higher confidence rating here especially if they are lower than the map data".
  • edited June 28
    Is it to hard to just take over when your in a construction zone? I cannot believe the amount of people that want the car to drive you by itself when it just not that safe. Use the system on the freeways and use your own system on surface streets and construction zones. Would you like people trusting it in school zones where your children go? Maybe in the 25th century they will have a better system like the Jetson's had on tv.
  • edited June 28
    @Tldickerson: The question is how the car is going to handle these things when no one is driving.
  • edited June 29
    We can worry about that when the rules of the road allow that no one is driving, but that's a ways off. Right now, some one is supposed to be driving.
  • edited November -1
    @EVRider, right now that isn't the case and I doubt that any of us will be around if and when that time comes.
  • edited June 29
    Really?
  • edited June 29
    Really Trop, let's just wait and see when that will even be allowed in the states or anywhere else for that matter.
  • edited June 30
    Well I plan on seeing it in my lifetime. Either you're very old or very ignorant. Which is it?
  • edited June 30
    Can’t it be both @Tropo? ;-)
  • edited June 30
    Some states already have legislation that allows for self driving cars. Tokyo was set up for it at this year’s postponed Olympics.
    https://www.ghsa.org/state-laws/issues/autonomous vehicles
  • edited November -1
    Barry....I got the nav update right after updating to 2020.20.1. even under full wifi signal, took overnight to load.
  • edited June 30
    With recent updates, has Tesla solved the problem of cars while being summoned, driving down the middle or wrong side while moving through a parking lot?
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