Solar Panels

Tesla Energy - the WORST!

if you're a CA resident considering solar panels, do NOT be tempted to go with Tesla like I was. The customer service department is the worst I've ever experienced. Hours and hours waiting to speak to customer service, just be booted and sent to another department. A simple processing problem isn't resolved after weeks of trying to get through to right people, to no avail. There are many other better options out there.

SolarCity was the black sheep in the Musk family, and it shows.

Comments

  • I have the same terrible experience. They are the worst I ever experienced. I want to know how to escalate this?! My order is pending for 3 months without any progress
  • Tesla customer service has been stellar during my five years of ownership, and has been the same for the vast majority of thousands of installations. Unfortunately, a small (but vocal) minority of buyers/lessees that have had a negative experience post here. I'm not minimizing their concerns, but their experiences are just not that common. People whose experience met their expectations rarely write about it.
  • WORST customer service and wait times ever
    order 3 weeks ago my application shows pending nobody calls nobody emails, one day i ask them and they say , they "have questions about my application" ,,why nobody called? they tell me to call a number in UTAH the person there never return my call my application sit there there again....im thinking of cancelling and get a mercedes or something else
  • Yall have way more patience than me. I asked Tesla twice to call me about my order, the second time they texted me a number to call, I canceled right then.
    If you can't get the ordering process right, imagine getting service later.

    To the poster claiming thousands of satisfied customers, please post your data to support that?
  • They have the worst customer service. I have my project started on May 18. It's still seating at the Permit. I got an email from the utility company said" The diagram doesn't meet the requirement". That is all I got for 3 months of waiting.
  • I’ve had my solar and powerwall installed for 2 months and I’m still waiting for Tesla to properly submit my documents to my electronic company for permission to turn on. Everytime Tesla submits docs to electric company it gets rejected. I contact electric company and they actually call me back. They feel bad for me and are not sure why Tesla cannot figure out how to submit docs correctly. Tesla tell me they’ve submitted docs and waiting on electric company. If I don’t keep working this I’ll never be able to turn the system on.
  • > @John_guzik70 said:
    > I’ve had my solar and powerwall installed for 2 months and I’m still waiting for Tesla to properly submit my documents to my electronic company for permission to turn on. Everytime Tesla submits docs to electric company it gets rejected. I contact electric company and they actually call me back. They feel bad for me and are not sure why Tesla cannot figure out how to submit docs correctly. Tesla tell me they’ve submitted docs and waiting on electric company. If I don’t keep working this I’ll never be able to turn the system on.

    Sounds similar to my experience, however, my frustration has been with permitting. My permit application has been rejected 4 times! It finally got tentatively approved 2 weeks ago, but now it is on hold because apparently Tesla's Florida contractor's license is expired. I was told back in June that they were averaging 6 weeks for installations. I now have a tentative installation in November. With 1-2 weeks for inspections, and then 6-8 weeks for utility hookup I am now looking at 2021 completion! So much for the 2020 tax credit!! I am seriously wondering if I should even let them on my roof. I am in South Florida, and roof integrity is huge here. Hurricane Irma destroyed my roof 3 years ago. Is it safe to let Tesla do the install?
  • I've had stellar service with Tesla energy. Sorry about the few that had problems here. Each home is different with different permitting requirements in each locality. It, not something that can happen in a day or even a week.

    @jacknrascal - If you pay more than 10% of the installation before the end of the year, you can claim the entire amount in 2020 and get the higher IRS credit.

    My utility, PG&E, took 7 days to approve, but in another thread, seems one utility takes 3 months! Nothing much Tesla can do about a utility that doesn't want you to have solar.

    Tesla has there own inspectors separate from the city, that came twice during the project. For me, all the city inspections were done within 24 hours of Tesla's request. The continued work on other areas while waiting for the inspections, so it didn't delay the project. Not sure about your local building department - some are better than others. I've always been impressed with our city's inspectors.
  • > @"TeslaTap.com" said:
    > I've had stellar service with Tesla energy. Sorry about the few that had problems here. Each home is different with different permitting requirements in each locality. It, not something that can happen in a day or even a week.
    >
    > @jacknrascal - If you pay more than 10% of the installation before the end of the year, you can claim the entire amount in 2020 and get the higher IRS credit.
    >
    > My utility, PG&E, took 7 days to approve, but in another thread, seems one utility takes 3 months! Nothing much Tesla can do about a utility that doesn't want you to have solar.
    >
    > Tesla has there own inspectors separate from the city, that came twice during the project. For me, all the city inspections were done within 24 hours of Tesla's request. The continued work on other areas while waiting for the inspections, so it didn't delay the project. Not sure about your local building department - some are better than others. I've always been impressed with our city's inspectors.



    Thanks for that info on the 10% prepayment locking in the tax credit. Do you have a reference for that? All of the IRS rulings I have found use the phrase "placed in service" as the determinant for which calendar year the credit is due. I do know that for "Commercial" solar, having begun the project locks in the credit, however, with the 2018 changes to the solar tax credit, "Residential" solar was required to meet the "placed in service" criteria. I have found some ambiguity as to whether grid hookup is required to meet "placed in service". Some places have said that if it is functioning for it's intended purpose and producing electricity for the home, but is NOT connected to the grid, then it can be considered "placed in service". I don't believe Tesla has any way to have the panels producing electricity for the home without being connected to the grid, thus requiring full grid connection to meet the "placed in service" hurdle in order to qualify for the residential tax credit.
  • If the breakers for the system are turned on - it is in service.
  • Tesla energy is definitely not run with the same high standards as the auto division. They just lost a 16k+ solar setup on my home because they would rather try and slip in some boilerplate reduced kW system to me rather than pickup the phone to see if I was good with a modification. I expected more more from Tesla, this really was a disappointment.
  • @jacknrascal - IRS could have changed it this year, but it was clear in the 2019 form 5695 that the year you qualified depended on when you paid 10% of the project's cost. I don't have the form handy.
  • This topic is interesting and luckily they didn't put solar on their cars. The only EV that has solar on the roof of their car is Fisker and they are claiming you can get up to 1000 miles per year from it on their upcoming SUV called the Ocean.
  • > @bassbone1_98264787 said:
    > This topic is interesting and luckily they didn't put solar on their cars. The only EV that has solar on the roof of their car is Fisker and they are claiming you can get up to 1000 miles per year from it on their upcoming SUV called the Ocean.

    Can you stop your marketing of Fisker in every thread?
    Its very obvious you work for Fisker so please admit that so its clear what your objectives are with all your postings.
  • > @jlhm said:
    > > @bassbone1_98264787 said:
    > > This topic is interesting and luckily they didn't put solar on their cars. The only EV that has solar on the roof of their car is Fisker and they are claiming you can get up to 1000 miles per year from it on their upcoming SUV called the Ocean.
    >
    > Can you stop your marketing of Fisker in every thread?
    > Its very obvious you work for Fisker so please admit that so its clear what your objectives are with all your postings.

    I'm a Tesla owner and a Fisker Ocean reservation holder (along with a Cybertruck). I am rooting for everyone. A solar panel roof is only available on Fisker cars and that is notable.
  • Is it the customer service or the assigned advisor or their contracted installers? Is it a specific person within a department? I mean the no response thing.
  • Solar is available on the Prius Prime, just not in the USA. A few other cars have solar, including the original Fisker Karma. Reports were it did close to nothing as far as extending range.

    The 1000 miles of range in optimum conditions could be valid. Several years ago I estimated a solar roof on the Tesla Model S would generate about 2 miles of range per day in 100% sun. So the Fisker claiming it is can get 2.7 miles a day is not that far off.

    The issue is few owners are going to be in 100% sun for 365 days a year. Even if you are in sun every day for 10-12 hours with the roof always perfectly clean, getting that 1000 miles of range is worth about $90/year. It's estimated that the retail cost of that solar roof adds about $3K to the cost of the vehicle so the payback is 33 years. Since few are able to keep the car in the sun 10-12 hours a day every day, the payback is really far worse.

    I don't think Fisker has released the option cost for the solar roof, but nothing wrong with offering it. It is just not a very good value. Far better to spend the money on house solar where the payback is far faster and not dependant on where the car is located.
  • > @"TeslaTap.com" said:

    > The 1000 miles of range in optimum conditions could be valid. Several years ago I estimated a solar roof on the Tesla Model S would generate about 2 miles of range per day in 100% sun. So the Fisker claiming it is can get 2.7 miles a day is not that far off.
    >
    > I don't think Fisker has released the option cost for the solar roof, but nothing wrong with offering it. It is just not a very good value. Far better to spend the money on house solar where the payback is far faster and not dependant on where the car is located.

    Right, good information, thanks. And yes Fisker hasn't released the configuration options on their SUV yet...hopefully it will be reasonable to add the solar roof because it's cool and will offer some total free miles, which is also cool. More information should be known soon about who's manufacturing their cars too which will also be interesting.
  • Putting PV on the roof of a moving vehicle is a waste of money, weight, and resources. Nothing more than a gimmick. At best, they can top up the 12V aux battery. My 2011 Leaf has one, for just that.

    You'd be flabbergasted at how many people think a tenth of a square meter of PV will power a moving vehicle. (I get asked that a LOT, on my Leaf.) It would take a hundred times that to give any appreciable range.
  • Just chiming in with my own terrible experience. We jumped through all the hoops, were months in, mid-permitting process and out of nowhere, without warning got a one-sentence email that our project had been cancelled. With zero explanation. When I got in touch with a rep it was like he reacted first with surprise and then like an emotionless, programmed robot with a fabricated reason for the cancellation (claimed our rafters were too widely spaced - huh? they are completely standard.)
  • > @gregbrew_98470014 said:
    > Putting PV on the roof of a moving vehicle is a waste of money, weight, and resources. Nothing more than a gimmick. At best, they can top up the 12V aux battery. My 2011 Leaf has one, for just that.
    >
    > You'd be flabbergasted at how many people think a tenth of a square meter of PV will power a moving vehicle. (I get asked that a LOT, on my Leaf.) It would take a hundred times that to give any appreciable range.

    The upcoming Fisker Ocean SUV will have a solar roof, and they say will average approx. 1000 free and clear miles per year.
  • Solar in a car is almost a scam. At 2.7 miles in a day, if in 100% sun for 10-12 hours. It really depends on the cost. If $3,000, the payback is about 33 years. Really makes very little sense.
  • my 2012 Prius IV has solar roof. It only powers the fans when I park in sun and thats all its purpose is. Instead of 120 degrees inside the car, it would be 110.
  • I already saw that, and it hasn't changed a thing. The solar on the Fisker vehicle is nothing more than a gimmick. It's a waste of money, weight, and resources. It's been tried for twenty years with the same result...worthless for anything practical.
Sign In or Register to comment.