Model 3

Bizarre charging issue

2018 M3 LR DM, NEMA 14-50 home charge setup.
Has been charging fine for almost 2 years. One day last week, plug in the Tesla charging cable - M3 display shows 245V, but 0A. Zero Amp! I didn't realize it until the next morning. M3 shows remaining time to charge to 90%, but not advancing because there is no current flow. Trouble shooting steps I have taken with no success:

1) flipped the circuit breaker switch off/on without the adapter plugged into M3. Charging cable lights up, still zero amp showing;

2) flipped the circuit breaker switch off/on with the adapter plugged into M3. Charging cable lights up, still zero amp showing;

3) adjusted my M3 amp intake from 32A to 5A. No effect;

4) took my M3 to supercharger, charged fine but only to 229 miles at 90% setting;

5) next day, borrowed neighbor's working adapter, and plug it in my M3; same thing - 245 V, zero A

6) now, I am thinking it has to be my home circuit!
After taking my M3 into Tesla, I got a 2014 Model S loaner home, and it charges fine at 32A with the exact same set up. Why is the Model S work, and my M3 doesn't charge! (remember, I have been using the same charging set up for almost 2 years. No major appliance or incidents (lightning/power outage, etc.) that I am aware of;

7) asked neighbor to drive his M3 to my garage and plug it in...same result, zero A, 245 V;

Now, I am thinking I have to do something to my NEMA 14-50 or the circuit breaker switch at home. Since the Model S charges, I can assume the NEMA 14-50 plug works fine, and I should go ahead and swap out a new circuit breaker switch.

Appreciate any thoughts that may help my situation. By the way, Tesla told me my M3 is fine after doing a thorough check and charged my battery to 90% @ 263 miles using my own charging cable. Tesla told me that the SuperCharger, due to its high voltage, has a different circuit in M3 to handle that. So, it is different than charging at home.

Really strange that the same set up charges loaner Model S fine, but can't seem to charge my M3. Appreciate other troubleshooting steps to try as well.

Thanks!

Hermie.

Comments

  • did you try and charge your car on your neighbors set up? that would double check its something with to do with your outlet or breaker
  • also you might (if you dont) use a high quality NEMA 14-50 plug vs. the cheap ($10-$20) outlet from home improvement stores.
  • > @stacok_98279004 said:
    > also you might (if you dont) use a high quality NEMA 14-50 plug vs. the cheap ($10-$20) outlet from home improvement stores.

    Do you mean the 3-Pole Flush Mount Industrial Grade Range Receptacle NEMA 14-50 plug and not the circuit breaker? What troubles me is that it worked for almost 2 years with no issues, and all of a sudden. Plugs don't go bad, do they? Also, the same set up charges fine on the loaner Model S.

    I suspect it is more likely the circuit breaker that regulates the current flow. Don't want to start changing out everything. Seem the most logical step is the circuit breaker?

    Thanks.
  • If you disconnect from outlet all the time outlet gets worn and could cause problems.
  • I think it’s weird that the S charged OK but I agree with suspecting the circuit breaker. I’m not an electrician though.
  • > @Hermie said:
    > > @stacok_98279004 said:
    > > also you might (if you dont) use a high quality NEMA 14-50 plug vs. the cheap ($10-$20) outlet from home improvement stores.
    >
    > Do you mean the 3-Pole Flush Mount Industrial Grade Range Receptacle NEMA 14-50 plug and not the circuit breaker?

    No but if you are replacing the breaker I would change the outlet to be safe. Outlets ( especially less expensive ones) will eventually go out. I had a 20 amp 240v extension go out after two years. Pulling constant current, as charging a car will takes its toll.
  • The only thing I can think of that makes any sense BUT it doesn't fit all the symptoms you describe:

    Did Scheduled Charging get enabled/messed up.

    Also @stacok_98279004 asked above "did you try and charge your car on your neighbors set up?". That should tell you if the problem is in the car or the home. Using a supercharger doesn't help as SuperChargers are DC and home chargers are AC.
  • Also scheduled charging and current limits are location based. So even if the car charges fine at a different location, it still may not at home.
  • Double-check the tightness of all your wiring connections before replacing stuff. Many times in many different applications, I've run across loose wire connections that result in similar problems. If you're not absolutely sure of how do do this safely, hire an electrician. The fact that it worked fine for 2 years doesn't rule out connections getting loose over time. Having said that, I've also seen breakers go bad over time but since the Model S charged fine, I would lean toward Model 3's more sensitive circuit monitoring, especially since you said your neighbors model 3 showed the same problem as yours. Did you ever try your car at your neighbors as others here have suggested?
  • > @stacok_98279004 said:
    > did you try and charge your car on your neighbors set up? that would double check its something with to do with your outlet or breaker

    Did not, but probably should. He has the Wall Charger anyway, so his isn't the same set up as mine. But, it would have helped to know if my M3 is charging probably before I brought it to Tesla.

    Does shutting down the entire circuit panel help? I have only turned off and on the dedicated 50A circuit breaker.
  • > @WW_spb said:
    > If you disconnect from outlet all the time outlet gets worn and could cause problems.

    Charging cable attached to the plug all the time. I don't unplug the cable from the plug. Thanks.
  • > @Hermie said:
    > > @stacok_98279004 said:
    > > did you try and charge your car on your neighbors set up? that would double check its something with to do with your outlet or breaker
    >
    > Did not, but probably should. He has the Wall Charger anyway, so his isn't the same set up as mine. But, it would have helped to know if my M3 is charging probably before I brought it to Tesla.
    >
    > Does shutting down the entire circuit panel help? I have only turned off and on the dedicated 50A circuit breaker.

    Turning off the entire panel probably won't do anything. Since the car is showing 245vac available, I'd be even more suspicious of a loose neutral or ground connection in the box or at the receptacle.
  • Or if it’s grounded to a stake in the ground it might have gotten too dry. Try watering the stake (seriously). I have seen this.
  • So likely it's your electric line, and the difference in sensitivity between M3 and MS allowed MS to charge while 2 M3s can't charge.
    https://forums.tesla.com/discussion/83751/problems-charging-at-home-have-called-tesla-6-times-already-no-help
  • > @daddy88 said:
    > So likely it's your electric line, and the difference in sensitivity between M3 and MS allowed MS to charge while 2 M3s can't charge.
    > https://forums.tesla.com/discussion/83751/problems-charging-at-home-have-called-tesla-6-times-already-no-help
    >

    Thanks for the post. I just tried 110V plug, showing 0 mile per hour charging. So, after almost 2 years of charging, the AMP just went bad. :confused:
  • Still could be Scheduled Charging. You didnt mention, if you checked out that menu yet.

    > @lbowroom said:
    > Also scheduled charging and current limits are location based.
  • Does it try to charge then stop or stay 0 amp immediately after plugging the car?

    Loose or burnside connection at every connection can cause problems.

    I had problem with J1772 adaptor before buying 6-50 adapter for Tesla mobile charger.

    After that, once it won’t charge because the plug was not fully inserted into the mobile unit.

    When you brought it to Tesla you should have bring you Tesla mobile charger so they could try it with the car.
    Given that you tried the 110v plug, it might be the mobile unit that is broken
  • Thanks to all those who read and replied my post.

    I would like to share an update to situation. After several trips to Tesla and trouble-shooting at home, there is absolutely nothing wrong with my home charging NEMA 14-50 plug, nor any faulty installation with my 50 AMP Circuit Breaker installed 2 years ago as suggested by Tesla Customer Service/Tech. Firmware version 36.16 updated had put everything back to pre-Sept time. Charging display the correct Amperage and Voltage as well as the number of miles per hour charging display correctly - at least it isn't zero!

    The lessons learned here is please don't go about assumption something wrong with your set up, especially things happened all of a sudden. Tesla always will suggest go "fix your problem" at your house. In my case, though, after plugging into a 110V outlet and charging slowly, but the display still showing 0 amp and 0 miles per hour. It is evident that something wasn't right with the Model 3. Just glad that Tesla is able to address this via a Firmware update.

    Now, the range has reduced from recent months normally 262 miles to a new low 255 miles. I have an extended range battery at 320 miles, but normally charge to 90%. I see the range has done from 288 to 255 in 2 years. Hope it doesn't go any further down in range. Just curious. Has anyone been able to get warranty replacement on battery? Tesla customer service told me that if it goes down to 224 miles when charged to 100%, then I will have a case.

    Thanks all.

    H!
  • There's an ongoing thread where other owners had exact same problem and Tesla sent them updates to fix it.

    Apparently one of the updates created the problem and next update fixed it.

    Looks like same thing happened to you.

    Thanks for posting the resolution.
  • edited October 11
    @Hermie: Problem arose when Tesla put in a change to improve charging times; report is that a somewhat impaired city power waveform that would have slid under the car's radar before was being detected as the End of All Times by the car, hence the zero charging. The bug fix ended the problem.
    As far as mileage: The SO and I have a 2018 M3 LR RWD; the "full-up" charge has varied from a low of 305 to a high of 325 and is currently meandering around 310. The people here will tell you that the range estimator is much more like a guess-o-meter; it's the car attempting to figure out the state of charge of the battery, outside temperature, and a half-dozen other things.
    Don't get me wrong: I'm not saying that the guess-o-meter on your car is reading low, and it _could_ be a sign of something gone wrong. But you've been going through some crazy charging cycles recently which may have led to the guess-o-meter, well, guessing wrong.
    Reports I've read say that charging the car to 100%, then going on a serious road trip or something like that that takes the car down to, say, 3% or so vaguely resets the guess-o-meter to something more sane. Even a mobile tech wandering by here one day to fix a sticky door handle spontaneously volunteered that letting the car discharge (with driving) down to 10% or 15% over several days, then charging up to near full, would result in more sane estimates.
    What I do know: The SO and I took a trip from NJ down to Savannah, GA in first quarter 2019, at a time when the guess-o-meter was running around 308 at "full" charge; by the second SC stop, the full number was over 320, and stayed that way until we got back, and once again started drifting down again. Recently, it was down to 308; took a trip to Boston and back, and 320 it was again.
    So, go for a near full discharge, then charge it back up again. If it's still reading 'way low, I'd guess complain at Tesla.
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