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Manual bypass

Is there a way to manually bypass the Tesla electronics with a manual switch, and connect the grid-meter to the load distribution circuit-breaker panels?
I am thinking that any active semiconductor-based electronics might fail at some point and need replacement. There will not be any after-hours electrician who can replace a Tesla Gateway or battery within few hours after failure. But the home still needs electricity.

Comments

  • Technically, yes - legally unlikely. The concern is during grid failure, a physical switch could back-power the grid from your solar / Powerwalls and risk electrocuting utility personal. I doubt any utility would allow such a switch.

    The Tesla gateway does not use semiconductors as a switch but has a large industrial relay to disconnect the house from the grid. I suppose it could fail, but it doesn't appear to be a real reliability concern. I've never heard of a failure.

    I suspect you're more likely to have a utility feed break (I've had two over the years). The utility came in a couple of days to fix it each time. Stuff happens, and you can't always have an instant solution for every scenario, no matter how unlikely.
  • There should be a way to avoid that feedback?
    For example with one switch or with 2 switches.
    see my drawing:
    https://ibb.co/pngKNxZ
    The issue is I can get a utility company technician in or a regular electrician to do emergency repair same or next day, but tesla gateway repair would have a 1-2 month wait time, so I would be out of electricity for 1-2 months.
  • I expect the gateway the least likely component to fail in the way you describe. It's not under high-stress and is fairly simple technology. The Inverters and Powerwalls are far more complex and under more heat/power stress.

    I guess Tesla's repair depends on where you are. I had a fairly minor issue and Tesla Energy was out in 5 days (inverted CT). Your switch idea should work. I'm not sure it's worth the bother for something that's not likely to ever happen but go for it if it worries you.

    You could just wait. Should the gateway fail, why not have the electrician hardwire bypass the gateway while disconnecting the inverter and Powerwall using the breakers. No cost unless it fails.
  • > @"TeslaTap.com" said:
    > I expect the gateway the least likely component to fail in the way you describe. It's not under high-stress and is fairly simple technology. The Inverters and Powerwalls are far more complex and under more heat/power stress.
    >
    > I guess Tesla's repair depends on where you are. I had a fairly minor issue and Tesla Energy was out in 5 days (inverted CT). Your switch idea should work. I'm not sure it's worth the bother for something that's not likely to ever happen but go for it if it worries you.
    >
    > You could just wait. Should the gateway fail, why not have the electrician hardwire bypass the gateway while disconnecting the inverter and Powerwall using the breakers. No cost unless it fails.
    >
    >

    How can someone live without electricity for 5 days? Once in 20 years I would be out of electricity for a week, due to a hurricane, as I live in Florida. The solar+powerwall would solve that. An electrical breakdown would unsolve that.
    I design electronics hardware as an engineer, and concerned about the MTBF of different components in the system.
    When I call an emergency electrician, the guy would probably refuse to touch it, as knowledge of Tesla Gateways is very rare .
    How do you hardwire bypass?
  • It's a trival task to bypass the gateway. I'd do it myself if needed, although I know what I'm doing and would check voltages, and flip all breakers off before doing such work. Any electrician could do the work in about 5 minutes. Very simple. Look - you seem very scared of the system. I'd recommend you not getting any solar or Powerwall as it seems too scary for you if you haven't bought it yet.

    Perhaps a generator with a transfer switch is more your style. Of course, you could run out of gas, the generator may fail, the transfer switch could break, or any of many other problem scenarios could occur - all far more likely that the gateway failing in my opinion.

    To swing back to your original proposal - yes, you could have some complex switching system to bypass the gateway. I'd guess it would cost about a thousand for equipment and installation, but perhaps cost more. Get a quote and if it makes you feel better, and go for it. Just seems completely unnecessary to me.
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