Model S

Battery Losing Miles while parked overnight

I just took delivery of my new 2020 Model S car 4 days ago and it seems to be losing miles overnight in the garage. Last night I lost 6 miles and there is nothing on in the car...no fans running ...I don't get it. Does anyone else have this problem ?

Comments

  • There are lots of microprocessors in the car that run 24/7. Everyone else has "this problem". The only way to stop it would be to disconnect the 12 volt battery. Don't actually do that. Stop checking on the car from your phone. Every time you do that it wakes the car up which increases power usage. Leave it alone and it will go into a deeper sleep after a while. Disable automatic presentation of the door handles when in the garage so it doesn't wake up every time you walk through the garage. Create a driver profile called Garage and configure it for what you want the car to do or not do while it is in the garage.
  • In addition to what Murphy states, there are two features that can consume a lot more power when parked. Sentry mode and Cabin overheat protection. Both are nice features, but they can consume quite a bit of power. Sentry mode can consume about 1 mile of range per hour. You can have it automatically turn off at home, or turn it off all the time. Cabin overheat only activates when the cabin gets very hot, and then it runs the AC to bring the temp down. It's harder to know how much range might be reduced as it depends on temperatures and how often it activates. If parked in a garage at home, it's unlikely to turn on unless you're in Pheonix or somewhere else where it gets to 105F+ in the shade.
  • I live in Las Vegas so I know that it will turn on when it’s extremely hot.
    The idea of creating a garage profile is a good idea...I think..but what if i walk by with my key it’s still going to catch that signal to present handles ....right?
  • > @DanetteHyt said:
    > I live in Las Vegas so I know that it will turn on when it’s extremely hot.
    > The idea of creating a garage profile is a good idea...I think..but what if i walk by with my key it’s still going to catch that signal to present handles ....right?

    If handle presentation is turned off it will catch the signal from the fob but it will not do anything about it. You can still get the handle to present by pushing on the handle.
  • Plugging your car in, even to 110 volt standard power, at all times is best for your car. You can add 3.5 to 4 miles per hour. If you don't want to add charge to your car battery you can set battery charge max to where it already is. This will keep your miles the same or at whatever you want.
  • I vented my garage to the attic and had two turbine vents installed. Then I insulated the garage door with a fresh air vent in the bottom center panel. This helped dramatically to pull air from bottom to attic. On hot days (Dallas, TX) it is incredible how much air moves now. Can’t help might help.
  • Loss of 6 miles per day in a Tesla is textbook normal. It’s called parasitic or vampire drain. Lots of things stay in and the main lack is brought online numerous times during the day to charge the small 12v battery (that’s why they fail so frequently). A greater daily loss indicates a problem or that T has been running battery coolant pumps or AC while the car sits there. I had max daily loss of 27mi/day when they did this. That’s just under 7kwh and makes a mockery of “gas savings”. But at 6 mi/day you will be losing about 550kwh/yr and this is considered normal.
  • Seeing fewer miles in a battery that has cooled from operating temperatures is not vampire drain. That capacity can be recovered when the battery warms. It’s possible that parasitic drains are contributory, but not supported by your brief example.

    My wife recently took our 3 cross country and parked it for the better part of a week at a friend’s, unplugged.
    I monitored the charge over 5 days via the app. Some would say waking the car is using up unnecessary energy by repeatedly interrupting a deeper sleep.

    Day 1 25%
    Day 2 24%
    Day 3 24%
    Day 4 24%
    Day 5 23%

    One percent equals just under 3 miles.

    When you arrive somewhere with a low SOC, the car gives a visual warning that the battery will show a lower range upon cooling and encourages plugging in.

    Of course, having large power consumers active like Summon standby or Sentry will consume charge.
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