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Other OEM’s watching Battery Day?

Do you think other OEM’s watched battery day presentation?
My guess is some Japanese and Korean OEM’s watched it.

Comments

  • Novonix put out a response, it was possibly hit with derision. Stock fell 50% intra day.

    Read it here:
    http://www.aspecthuntley.com.au/docserver/02284290.pdf?fileid=02284290&datedir=20200923&edt=MjAyMC0wOS0yMysxOTo0Mjo0NSs0ODArNjMwMzY2K2FuZHJld3dlc3QrcmVkaXJlY3QraHR0cDovL3d3dy5hc3BlY3RodW50bGV5LmNvbS5hdS9pbWFnZXNpZ25hbC9lcnJvcnBhZ2VzL3BkZnRpbWVvdXQuaHRtbCtodHRwOi8vd3d3LmFzcGVjdGh1bnRsZXkuY29tLmF1L2ltYWdlc2lnbmFsL2Vycm9ycGFnZXMvcGRmZGVsYXllZC5qc3A=
  • > @"David N" said:
    > Do you think other OEM’s watched battery day presentation?
    > My guess is some Japanese and Korean OEM’s watched it.

    The battery makers that Tesla uses, LG, CATL, Panasonic are the same ones everyone else uses so whatever Musk talked about, all the other EV car execs have heard from the battery manufacturers.

    The battery tech evolution is not limited to nor lead by Tesla. Kind of sad day for US tech in a way in that all the big battery mfgs are Asian or EU.
  • Except that this new 4680 cell is Tesla's design and made by them, in Fremont.

    Yes, other OEMs were certainly watching. What people are already forgetting about yesterday was that they talked about more than battery cell tech. They also spoke about several methods to reduce building costs of vehicles, like the casting process. If you watch the video, they showed both the front and rear sections of a vehicle being made of singles castings. Essentially a car being constructed of 3 pieces, front casting, middle section with battery cells in it and then the rear casting. they also have developed their own alloy for these castings.
  • Battery Day was very different to what I was expecting - not a big flashy leap forward like "here's our prototype of a solid state battery" but a very detailed roadmap of engineering improvements that together bring about great things, like affordable 500 mile range, and $25K teslas.

    It was putting other battery and vehicle manufacturers on notice and for sure they are all watching. This is really an unprecedented level of transparency for a company at this stage in its growth - the aim is clearly to accelerate the efforts of others and bring about a worldwide transition from fossil fuel powered vehicles to electric.

    Making the battery part of the structure of the vehicle is also great thinking, rather than "here is our skateboard or Modular Electric Platform on which we will build different bodies". Which itself is an improvement on here's a vehicle designed for ICE power and we've awkwardly shoehorned a mediocre battery and electric drivetrain into it aka compliance cars.
  • It was a great day for US tech and Tesla is showing leadership, innovation and transparency. Most companies manage two out of these three at best.

    Also, the reference to the lithium resources available in Nevada was talking about making batteries here for US vehicles.

    Thankfully there is also no Osborne effect (yet) so our current Teslas are not obsolete overnight but we can enjoy 300 miles of real world range (200 winter) while looking forward to 500 miles in good weather and 300 + in winter.
  • Of course competing OEMs watched. That's part of business operations.
  • I'm not so sure if other vehicle manufacturers looked in. Sadly, they seem to mostly have their heads in the sand. At best they look at how they can compete with the 2012 Model S, and often fail at that target. Why would they care about what Tesla will do in the future when they haven't cared about Tesla or EVs in the past?

    Also, to them, batteries are a commodity that you look for the cheapest price and then stuff them into an abandoned ICE body. The latest non-Tesla designs still use pouch cells, a totally different approach. Pouches can be manufactured similar to phone batteries so no major design work is needed to make a cell. Of course, it's one reason all the competitors still have poor range compared with Tesla and the battery costs are still higher than Tesla.
  • > @jordanrichard_629778 said:
    > Except that this new 4680 cell is Tesla's design and made by them, in Fremont.”

    CATL and LG announcements a while ago went past Tesla’s on battery evolution. Both are also Tesla suppliers.

    GM/LG’s low Cobalt is probably the biggest news about EV batteries in last six months.
  • Only foreign automakers bought Sandy's teardown report of the Model 3 & Y. So i imagine that any automaker with a foot in EV production was paying attention to what they are up against. That being said, its highly likely that Tesla will have brought yesterdays announcements to market by the time these companies figure it out. They have to accelerate faster than Tesla in order to keep up.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > > @"David N" said:
    > > Do you think other OEM’s watched battery day presentation?
    > > My guess is some Japanese and Korean OEM’s watched it.
    >
    > The battery makers that Tesla uses, LG, CATL, Panasonic are the same ones everyone else uses so whatever Musk talked about, all the other EV car execs have heard from the battery manufacturers.
    >
    > The battery tech evolution is not limited to nor lead by Tesla. Kind of sad day for US tech in a way in that all the big battery mfgs are Asian or EU.

    But Tesla has the more vertical integration than any other OEM
  • It's hard not to think that the Battery Day presentations were poorly thought out and misdirected. The current Tesla marketing philosophy here and internationally simply miss the target. People don't buy Teslas because they are cheap or about to get cheaper (in three years maybe... Yawn). They buy them because it is prestigious to own one. It differentiates them from the rest of the crowd. Why try to be a county fair when you are Disney World to the masses? Hard to understand...
  • People buy Tesla bc they are high tech and fun. Only tools buy car for prestige image.
  • @JayNa,
    Some people buy Teslas for the prestige, some for the tech, some for the ecology, some for the performance - and maybe combinations or other reasons.
    The problem is that we need EVs for the masses who buy Chevys, Hondas, and Toyotas with no prestige, boring tech, bad ecology, and laughable performance.
    I'm sure Tesla will always have models for the first bunch as they do with the S and X today and, to a lesser extent, the 3 and Y. They still one for those who won't pay for more than just basic transportation. That missed group won't pay much more than $25K or less. Tesla's going to have to build them because it seems evident that nobody but them will.
  • @JayNa, the prestige factor is so low on my list that it is embarrassing to have what some would consider a "high status" car. I got the Tesla because it was an EV that looked great and performed well.

    Check out Tesla's mission and you will understand that prestige and exclusivity will not help achieve the goal to accelerate the advent of sustainable energy.
  • > @JayNa said: They buy them because it is prestigious to own one. It differentiates them from the rest of the crowd. Why try to be a county fair when you are Disney World to the masses? Hard to understand..."

    Or why pretend to be Snow King vs. Jackson Hole.

    People still think my $52k Model 3 is a $100k car.
  • > @Teslionaire said: > But Tesla has the more vertical integration than any other OEM

    Not sure that's true and likely not true at Tesla's China plant where the 21st centuries top industrial base operates more in the distributed mfg model with suppliers and end user assembly plants located next to each other.

    If vertical integration of the 1920's works for Tesla, great. If the 2020 distributed China model works for Tesla great.

    Tesla's batteries are Panasonic, CATL and LG same as other EV mfgs so foundation of the car is from other mfgs.
  • LOL. By that notion, the foundation of a car is the same as the foundation of a flashlight.
  • > @M-A-B-MCMLXXX said: By that notion, the foundation of a car is the same as the foundation of a flashlight."

    That "notion" is Musk's and why the Tesla plant is actually a Tesla assembly plant and a Panasonic battery mfg plant.
  • > @FISHEV said: Tesla's batteries are Panasonic, CATL and LG same as other EV mfgs so foundation of the car is from other mfgs.
    @M-A-B-MCMLXXX said: By that notion, the foundation of a car is the same as the foundation of a flashlight."
    > @FISHEV said: That "notion" is Musk's

    Kindly show Elon Musk stating that all EV mfgs have the same foundation as Tesla. I'll wait, even though I'm waiting for you to source your statements and claims from myriad threads.
  • > @M-A-B-MCMLXXX said:> Kindly show Elon Musk stating that all EV mfgs have the same foundation as Tesla."

    On your own explaining your own statement, not one I made.

    I noted that the battery is the foundation of an EV in cost and tech and that "foundation" is purchased by Tesla from Panasonic, CATL and LG.
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