Model 3

Tesla Model 3 SR Battery degradation after 1 year

I have just completed one year with Tesla Model 3 SR and I was surprised to see that the maximum range have a significant drop and now it is showing 352 KM for full charge. This is almost 12% degradation in 1 year. Is this normal ?
«13

Comments

  • Thanks, this was really helpful. I was little worried to see that.
  • @go4arjun_98538402, above posters are correct. Our M3LR almost one year old and our range has been anywhere from 296-310. In past month alone it went up and down and up again from 301 to 308.
  • The battery meter range estimate is not influenced by driving style. It is based on the EPA rated efficiency and the ESTIMATED battery capacity remaining. The energy graph is based upon actual driving efficiency. So there are two different range estimates presented on the display.

    As others have stated. The battery meter range is just an estimate and not an indicator of battery health. Having said that some degradation is normal and should be expected even early in the car’s life. However, the battery meter range does not represent degradation.

    https://www.tesla.com/support/range
  • Also degradation makes your range go only one way. And can't go up and down.
  • My sr+ is also in the 350km range after 1 year and almost 50k km.
  • @"Magic 8 Ball" No, you just have to go downhill more than uphill.
  • Nice M8B!

    The range and misleading degradation issues come up so often, I wrote a detailed article to explain it:
    https://teslatap.com/articles/range-university/

    It also shows how to calibrate the range indicator and shows charts of battery degradation by miles from many owners.
  • I've had my M3 SR+ for 13 months and 14,000 miles. I've set the battery meter to show me the state-of-charge percentage rather than estimated range. My range has been pretty much averaging to 250 miles for a full-charge equivalent. Weather, temperature and driving conditions are all factors, but otherwise the batteries are performing as advertised.
  • Not normal and not likely the battery has that much degradation. I deep discharge frequently, all fast DC charging and 32,000 miles in about a year and my battery degradation is 6%.

    https://forums.tesla.com/discussion/173888/model-3-battery-degradation-6-first-year-37-000-miles

    Here are some links that you can use to check it out. I'd go with StatsApp first if you have an iPhone, easy to understand graphic. Then use the Battery Health companion app to see where you Model 3 is vs. other owners.

    TeslaFI.com will show you your battery degradation.

    https://imgur.com/y9IFMFm

    And StatsApp is another IOS app that does the same thing.

    https://www.maadotaa.com/

    https://imgur.com/hXnUjwH

    There's a companion app, Battery Health, that you can use to compare your battery degradation to other Model 3s.

    https://imgur.com/vQwhJlO
  • None show real degradation
  • Like stingray said the miles on the battery meter are fixed and based on EPA rating. Anyone who says differently probably doesn’t actually own a Tesla. Personally I think Tesla messed up making the meter have the option to read distance instead of just %, It creates confusion. Does your phone battery meter read minutes? Set the battery to % and use the energy app for estimated range.
  • > @coleAK said:
    > Like stingray said the miles on the battery meter are fixed and based on EPA rating."

    Don't think that is correct. As battery capacity drops so does the Rated Range shown on the battery meter. People would be running out of power if it was not accurate at matching battery capacity with miles to go.

    It does use the based EPA miles so the Rated Range number is not adjusted for environmental condidtions but it is reading the battery capacity which is diminished by battery degradation.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > > @coleAK said:
    > > Like stingray said the miles on the battery meter are fixed and based on EPA rating."
    >
    > Don't think that is correct. As battery capacity drops so does the Rated Range shown on the battery meter. People would be running out of power if it was not accurate at matching battery capacity with miles to go.
    >
    > It does use the based EPA miles so the Rated Range number is not adjusted for environmental condidtions but it is reading the battery capacity which is diminished by battery degradation.
    >

    Like in many other things you are wrong. The battery meter correlates a % to a distance. On my LR since day 1 until now 25 months later, 50% = 155 miles. Every time I have checked it, winter when I’m getting ~400 Wh/mi or summer when it’s ~240 Wh/mi, it’s always the same. If and when battery degradation occurs the battery meter distance for a given % will still be the same. For example if my battery degrades 10%, the max charge will be 90% or ~279 miles.
  • > @coleAK said: The battery meter correlates a % to a distance."

    Sounds right. How much range for how much battery capacity. Just keep in mind battery capacity is always changing, always going down.

    Your idea seems to be that the percent is a constant vs. car measuring actual charge in the battery. To get per cent you need to measure battery capacity. If the capacity at full charge is lower due to battery degradation, it will show less range.

    Easiest is get the TeslaFI.com or StatsApp battery degradation tools which provide a good baseline.
  • Sigh. Fish is back. A troll of the first water who likes fooling newbies. Public Service Announcement:
    FISHEV is a known troll of several years standing and several user
    names who pushes an anti Tesla narrative. Please take his opinions with a grain of salt, avoid any advice he may suggest, and do not let him implant any Fear, Uncertainty, or Doubt
    about Tesla or your car into your own opinion.
  • > @coleAK said:
    @The battery meter correlates a % to a distance.

    More accuracy, the car estimates remaining energy and displays range as a function of that estimate and a constant.
  • On the battery meter unless there is an OTA update to change the formula, my car will always show %*3.1=miles. 25%=78 miles, 50%=155 miles, and 75%=233 miles. Currently sitting in my car it shows 43% =133 miles, energy app shows 110 miles based on 287 Wh/mi.

    I wonder if some of the battery meter mile confusion is around the charge stop? I have mine set to 70%. More times than not when I get in it isn’t 70%, most of the time it’s 71%, but I’ve seen everything from 68-73%. Given that if I had it set to miles I’d get ~211 to 226 miles based on the same set charge atop point.
  • > @coleAK said:
    > On the battery meter unless there is an OTA update to change the formula, my car will always show %*3.1=miles."

    But the "percent" (the energy stored in the battery) is going down so the range goes down as battery degrades. That's why toggling to the per cent display is meaningless unless you know the state of the battery and the actual energy stored.
  • Yes If the battery degrades the range will be less. But the argument is does the battery meter distance scale change, And no it does not.
  • Does anybody know at what constant speed under ideal conditions the EPA and WLTP ranges are reached? I guess it's somewhere around 90 km/h = 56 mph, but I'd like to know a more accurate figure.
  • Battery pack temperature can effect the reading on the battery meter.
  • > @hgmichna said:
    > Does anybody know at what constant speed under ideal conditions the EPA and WLTP ranges are reached? I guess it's somewhere around 90 km/h = 56 mph, but I'd like to know a more accurate figure.

    I don’t know what the WLTP test gamut is, but the EPA test is not a constant speed.

    https://fueleconomy.gov/feg/fe_test_schedules.shtml
Sign In or Register to comment.