Model S

When does my ESA expire - exactly when is the 4 years up?

I purchased an ESA for my MS at about the 3 year/45000 mile point. It is good for 4 years/50000 miles.

When does it expire? The mileage part is easy, that would expire at 100000 miles. But my lifestyle has drastically changed, and now I driver perhaps 8000 miles per year, so I expect it will expire after 4 years. I'm sure it isn't 4 years after I purchased it. But, when I that? Is it 8 years after I purchased the car, or is it 4 years after the car hit 50000 miles (during my 3rd year of ownership)?

If the latter, what is the exact date? 4 years after the day the odometer hit 50000 miles? I don't know when that was. Does Tesla know that date? I wonder if I ask they will tell me.

Comments

  • I believe the time is calculated from when the original warranty expired.
  • I do too. But when is that? I don't know the exact day my car crossed 50000 miles. I suppose Tesla knows?
  • My ESA says "coverage becoming available on and retroactive to the date that Your New Vehicle Limited Warranty expires (the “EffectiveDate”)" I suspect your ESA reads similar. I don't think Tesla cares if you hit the 50K miles mark prior to the time the 4 year new vehicle warranty expires(d). They should honor your ESA for 4 years from the “EffectiveDate” your new vehicle warranty expires(d).
  • Does ESA expire 8 years from delivery date or 100,000 miles, whichever occurs first?
  • > @Doublelift_98044671 said:
    > I do too. But when is that? I don't know the exact day my car crossed 50000 miles. I suppose Tesla knows?
    >

    I think you misunderstood what I was trying to say. I believe the expiration date of the extension is 4 years from the original expiration date - nothing to do with the miles.

    So if the original warranty were 4 years from delivery date, and the extension is 4 years, the expiration date is 8 years from delivery date.
  • @inconel - Yes.
  • I finally have an answer from Tesla. Via chat, I found that my ESA (if I do not drive 100,000 miles) expires 4 years after I originally reached 50,000 miles, which was about 3 years after purchase.

    I did not know the exact date I crossed 50,000 miles, which started the clock on the ESA. Tesla chat told me the date, and it is close to my own estimate.

    tldr;

    By the way, it was unbelievably frustrating getting that information. Neither SC in my city will answer the phone (a recording says to use the app to schedule service). I tried a number of emails (for example, [email protected] went away a while back), and none were returned. I sent a letter to Tesla HQ, and they did not answer me. It took about 2 1/2 weeks of trying to get through on the chat, trying a few times every day, it was always greyed out (I understand that means they are too busy to talk to me). Once I did get to an agent, it took her about 35 minutes after I had given her all the information to answer the single question. I love my MS and will buy another Tesla, but I cannot imagine a single other car manufacturer who will not talk to its customers of $100K cars.
  • @Doublelift_98044671, I agree with this statement of yours.
    "but I cannot imagine a single other car manufacturer who will not talk to its customers of $100K cars".
    The price of the car really doesn't matter. It's called customer service/relationship.
  • It would be an extra $30K ($130K) vehicle if you bought it from a dealer with their markups and extra staff available to research and answer every question that comes up. I'd rather have the savings and I'm willing to read the manual search the internet for answers to save $30K.

    I realize that wouldn't answer the exact date a car went past 50K miles, but really not something most would care about. No other vehicle manufacturer would even have that information.
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