Model 3

M3 is the only Tesla now recommended by Consumer Reports

https://www.cnbc.com/2020/11/19/tesla-model-s-no-longer-recommended-by-consumer-reports.html

>>>" For the first time, the Japanese brand Mazda ranked at the top of the nonprofit organization’s reliability list. Toyota and Lexus ranked second and third, respectively. They had always been at the top spot since the survey began in 2005, Consumer Reports said.

Buick, Honda and Hyundai were No. 4-6 on this year’s reliability list. Ford Motor’s Lincoln brand, down 11 spots from a year ago, ranked last in the study, behind Tesla."<<<

Comments

  • CR can’t get their shit straight. What CR uses as a basis for the decision making for recommending a model or not, is flawed. All that matters is which brand has the highest satisfaction rating amongst their subscribers. That is Tesla.
  • This is simply CR trying to remain relevant in a world where they are no longer needed.
  • If you look through previous posts when CR gave a less than stellar review of Tesla, the majority of owners really didn't care. Many of those (myself included) felt like CR is becoming irrelevant and isn't capable of objectively evaluating Tesla.

    CR is what my 90 year old mom considers a "go to" source for reliable reviews. I don't see CR having much penetration or influence with younger consumers.
  • I have never put much faith in anything that CR tells us.
  • > @jordanrichard_629778 said: All that matters is which brand has the highest satisfaction rating amongst their subscribers. That is Tesla. "

    It is the same owners reporting the problems, you can't have one without the other.

    Tesla has become the MG of it's time. Owners love the car but a lot of problems that other car mfgs. just don't have.

    Many of use put up with it for now to get an EV but it will be interesting in 2021 and 2022 as other EV's come out how that holds up.

    Fully 30% of Mustang EV customers are moving from Tesla because of the issues, even one of the fanbois from Tesla Forums who has 3P but says his wife is getting a Mustang EV.
  • ⚠️ Warning ⚠️
    🤡🦅🐠🌰 Is present.
    Skip his lies and false narrative to stay sane.
  • edited November 20
    > @FISHEV said:

    > Fully 30% of Mustang EV customers are moving from Tesla because of the issues, even one of the fanbois from Tesla Forums who has 3P but says his wife is getting a Mustang EV.
    >
    The aquatic troll clown still talking about a vehicle that is yet to be seen on the roads! LOL
  • Sigh. I'm going to say this about CU, again. So: 2018 M3's come out, CU sends out their surveys, subscribers fill out the surveys, return them by web or by snail-mail, CU cranks numbers, and then publishes the reliability/form-fit/whatever some six months after T=0.
    CU may be weird; yes, I've seen that video of the CU driver putting himself into a shaking frenzy with Autopilot turned on; but other than the maniac response to the unknown, they do tend to be data-driven.
    The first batch of M3's back in early 2018, when they finally got enough responses to do reliable statistics, _did_ have issues. No joke. There were lots of trips to the Service Centers and back. And, lo and behold, M3's in late 2018 were rated poorly by CU. And.. they had the data to prove it.
    And, here we are again. MY's were released in early 2020. People bought them. The annual survey struck. Paint issues, form and fit, sure: Same Bat Time, Same Bat Station. Is Tesla going to get better? Sure. They have, reliably. But, in the meantime, look at the timing: That report this week was _started_ in June through July or so, when the MY's were first hitting ground zero in enough numbers to justify the statistics.
    Tesla really does improve rather quickly; I would be surprised if the MY build quality wasn't lots better right this minute.
    But.. CU making up stuff about build quality a couple quarters ago? Don't think so. CU gets sued occasionally by some out-of-control manufacturer: Think about the Suzuki roll-over, that CU had to actually put outriggers on in order to keep their drivers safe during the standard avoidance maneuvers. And it wasn't a joke - those Suzuki's rolled over on people, with deadly effect, lots. As a result it got an "avoid" from CU, Suzuki sued.. And lost in court. Suzuki knew they would lose, probably, it was the epitome of a SLAPP suit. But, if CU had _made_ _up_ that stuff, the damage in court would have been much, much worse.
    First year of any model car tends to rate poorly over at CU and that's with good reason. The answer: Wait until next year.
  • “ Fully 30% of Mustang EV customers are moving from Tesla because of the issues”

    So like 10 people?
  • On the mache forum you’ll gush over how great Tesla is....
  • I've always found CU's reports useful for auto reliability. Their data comes from a lot of actual owners. Owner satisfaction is different from reliability. I tend to keep my cars longer than most, so reliability matters. If a car gets unreliable, it's days are numbered. If I think it was unreasonably so (i.e. stranded me) I won't trust that brand again. Tesla is pushing the performance and efficiency envelope. I'll give some for that, but if the car strands me, my relationship with Tesla might be over.
  • Funny that fishy posted over on the Mach E forum that the range of the Mach E was disappointing and that he may cancel his order.
  • Twochewy, the problem with CR’s “reliability” ratings is that everyone’s definition of something being an issue or not is different. People’s expectations play an enormous part in their outlook of something being a problem or not.

    You cite that reliability as being important. Great, what is your definition of being reliable? In over 184,000 miles my Model S has never once left me stranded or been towed. As I mentioned above though, I have made several trips to my service center over the past 6 plus years. You may consider that as being “unreliable”, but I don’t. I keep things in context and that is I knew going in when I ordered my car in Jan 2014, that there were going to be issues because at the time, Tesla had only been making the MS for 1 1/2 years. Also that there was so much new tech.
  • > @jordanrichard_629778 said: > FISH, I have a very long list of things that I have had worked on for my 2014 Model S to include the onboard charger, while out of warranty, door handle issues, etc. I would and still do highly recommend the car. Something being an "issue" is subjective and clearly these issues aren't big enough to sway people from being satisfied with their purchase. "

    Not really. I'd say you are typical enthusiast who is reporting a lot of serious problems but you chose to overlook them for whatever reasons.

    Consumers looks at that and says the level and severity of the problems is too much for them to recommend the car to buyers. It's what we look to CR to do, identify the issues for buyers.

    Some may choose to overlook the issues for the same reasons you do but CR is right in pointing them out and consistent in taking a position on them in any car
  • This seems pretty rational to me:
    https://www.consumerreports.org/hybrids-evs/reliability-problems-plague-newer-electric-cars/

    E-Tron owners reported drive-system electrical failures along with power equipment issues. Model Y owners reported numerous build quality issues, such as paint problems (one of our members said that the day they received the car, there was dust, debris, and human hair stuck in the paint) and body alignment problems that led to owners not being able to close the rear hatch. Kia Niro EV owners reported problems such as having to replace a bearing in the electric motor.

    ...

    In the past, CR has assigned predicted reliability ratings for EVs based upon the simplicity of EV powertrains, as well as the manufacturer or model’s track record. However, our latest data show that EVs can have more problems because they often launch with new platforms and can be equipped with relatively new or advanced technologies.

    “Often, it’s not the EV tech that’s problematic,” says Anita Lam, CR’s associate director of automotive data integration. “It’s all the other new technology that could show up on any car—new infotainment systems, more sophisticated power equipment and gadgets—that often gets put on new EVs to feed a perception that they’re supposed to be luxurious and high-tech.”

    As a result of these findings, CR is changing the predicted reliability for several cars. While CR has not yet tested the Ford Mustang Mach-E and the Mercedes-Benz EQC, their reliability predictions are now below average. The Taycan, Porsche’s first-ever EV, impressed us on our test track, and it’s loaded with new equipment and tech. While we don’t have sufficient data from our members on the Taycan, because the new data showing problems with other EVs (this is Porsche’s first EV) we downgraded our reliability prediction for the vehicle from average to below average, and the Taycan is no longer recommended.
  • edited November 21
    "Fully 30% of Mustang EV customers are moving from Tesla because of the issues"

    You must have completely removed the left half of your brain before typing this particular creation.
  • > @M-A-B-MCMLXXX said: While CR has not yet tested the Ford Mustang Mach-E and the Mercedes-Benz EQC, their reliability predictions are now below average."

    Not until they test them and in both cases, Ford and Mercedes have the same better than Tesla ADAS systems on existing cars for a while now with good reliability ratings.
  • edited November 21
    > @FISHEV said:
    > > @M-A-B-MCMLXXX said: While CR has not yet tested the Ford Mustang Mach-E and the Mercedes-Benz EQC, their reliability predictions are now below average."
    >
    > Not until they test them and in both cases, Ford and Mercedes have the same better than Tesla ADAS systems on existing cars for a while now with good reliability ratings.

    ... You do realize that was a direct quote from Consumer Reports, yes?
  • One of the problems with CU is that it simply isn't adapting to the times. It's readership is aging and it is no longer profitable:
    https://www.theatlantic.com/business/archive/2016/04/consumer-reports-in-the-age-of-the-amazon-review/477108/

    I don't question the accuracy of their data or their data collection methodologies, but I have not seen them disclose the weighting system they use that results in Cadillac getting a better self driving rating than Tesla when Tesla was superior in all but one category. It seems that CU prioritized driver engagement to a percentage that effectively negates all other categories, yet failed to disclose the rational or scientific basis for such weighting. This lack of transparency, combined with their reviewer Jake Fisher who's nervous nellie, twitchy, head jerking "auto pilot test drive" video was clearly a performance meant to illustrate how "unsafe" he felt, came off as dishonest and overly dramatic.

    It's even evident in one of their more recent videos where the moron testing didn't have auto pilot engaged and then claims it blew through a stop sign.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IQOf_F6hibk

    I would have somewhat more respect for CU if they learned how to engage auto pilot before they attempted to review it.
  • > @JimMartin said: > I would have somewhat more respect for CU if they learned how to engage auto pilot before they attempted to review it."

    But you'd get more respect if you actually read CR's response.

    "CR's testers did experience both scenarios."

    One of it being driving through the stop light with FSD on.

    Most interesting about this video is it does note Tesla's clearly false claim that current Model 3's could be fully autonomous robotaxis with current hardware.

    The poor thing can't even see big rocks right next to it.

    https://forums.tesla.com/discussion/178872/slight-collision-with-rock-no-warning

    Or clear lane markers.

    https://forums.tesla.com/discussion/178524/lane-keeping-doesnt-work-in-model-3-lr-awd-with-ap

    Or cars in its blind spot.

    https://forums.tesla.com/discussion/173718/blind-spot-warning-problems/p1
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