Solar Roof

Tesla Forums are now read only. To continue the conversation with the Tesla community visit engage.tesla.com.

Costing Clarification Needed

I dont see any way to post or insert screen shots, but my question is the items they list in the cost contract.
The first item is called SOLAR ROOF- $$$$
The second item is called ROOF-$$$
I am in Florida where permits are easy to get, building a new workshop, 75% done ;detached, and plan to just put down the membrane and wait for Tesla to install. It will be ,10kw , tier 1 due to stupid insurance rules, and no power wall, just net-metering. The building permit is good for a year.
So there is no tear off cost, just new solar shingles, inverter, breaker , disconnect, and wiring.
Tesla PM told me the typical cost for a solar roof , is $7.65sf...is that hardware , inverter, electrical included ? because that matches the ROOF cost,
So what is in each cost, why are there two?
Tom

Comments

  • I'm guessing that the second line item is an allowance for the roof work that is necessary in most installations. If your solar roof will require minimal pre-installation roof work, I'd recommend discussing the reduction (or elimination) of that line item prior to your signing a contract. It might require a visit to your site by a knowledgeable Tesla person, which will likely slow down the process.
  • Since your question is posted in the Solar Roof Forum so I assume you are asking about the Solar Roof Purchase Agreement line items. The item listed as Solar Roof should have a kW size with it and it is for tiles with solar cells. The item listed as Roof should have square footage with it and it is the part of your roof with dummy glass shingles (no solar cell), they add up together as total cost for your solar roof installation. These 2 line items do not include pre-construction cost, if you need repair or something before solar roof can be installed that should be listed under a different line item.
  • The reason for the two amounts is the solar portion of the roof can qualify for the IRS solar credit, whereas the non-solar portion cannot. The solar roof portion gets a 26% credit against taxes you pay if done in 2020. The credit drops to 22% in 2021.
  • I stand corrected. Bad guess. Thanks!
  • So, since it is so hard to speak to a real Tesla person, what is % of active solar shingles vs dummy shingles?
    Based upon above, then the $7.65 cost I was quoted is only for the active shingles. So when mfgr mixes active and dummy shingles, into a roof, I have to separate them for the purposes of the tax credit?.....makes no sense. They are an inseparable product/project.
  • You can argue with the IRS or congress, but that's the way the credit offered. Only the solar portion is eligible for the credit. If it was all allowed, you could reroof your house and put in a 10"x10" solar cell from Harbor Freight that costs $15, and then deduct the entire roof cost. That wouldn't do much to help with green energy - the purpose of the credit. Along with the solar portion of the roof, you can include Powerwalls, inverters, the gateway, and the labor for the solar/powerwall/gateway portion.

    In my case, the roof was about 50/50 solar panels vs blank panels, a 10.8 kWh system.

    Not sure what the $7.65 cost is. Perhaps you meant $76,500?
  • > @laheyth said:
    > So, since it is so hard to speak to a real Tesla person, what is % of active solar shingles vs dummy shingles?
    > Based upon above, then the $7.65 cost I was quoted is only for the active shingles. So when mfgr mixes active and dummy shingles, into a roof, I have to separate them for the purposes of the tax credit?.....makes no sense. They are an inseparable product/project.

    You can mix them together if you like and take the chance in not getting audited. I would keep lube in the house, because the IRS agents don't carry it around.
  • The breakout numbers for just the solar portion are useful to compare this new category product to other more traditional solar products. That said, there is no detailed breakdown of necessary electrical systems components. We don't really know what those components are, or how much they are being billed. It doesn't hurt to ask for that info as soon as it is available.
  • All the electrical work is required for the solar/Powerwall, so should all be part of the IRS credit. I'm not an accountant, so you may want to check with a tax pro on the details.
  • laheyth, If I replace my traditional roof, and then put solar panels on top of it during the same construction period, should I be able to write off the roof replacement? Of course not.

    It's your objection to the splitting out of active panels for the tax credit that makes no sense.
Sign In or Register to comment.