General

We need a North America CCS to Tesla Adaptor

Superchargers are great — but in spite of great planning they sometimes take you 30-45 minutes off your route.

A great alternative to Tesla Superchargers is the new network that Electrify America is building. Their network has CCS chargers that offer 150kw and 350kw. They also have CHAdeMO at 50kw.

A CCS to Tesla adapter would provide additional charging options — making EV ownership more practical for all.
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Comments

  • Oh baby!

    Yes we do but Tesla is making big revenue and profits from charging now so it wants to keep its captive market.

    The CCS adapter in EU costs $200 and Tesla should provide it in US.
  • No thanks, happy with Tesla’s network, Tesla owners don’t need the hassle of ccs
  • > @blkice said:
    > No thanks, happy with Tesla’s network, Tesla owners don’t need the hassle of ccs

    Then don't buy one but many Tesla owners could use it and want it.
  • Then make one. Tesla will likely abide by the standard, which explicitly prohibits inlet adaptors, unless forced by a higher authority. However tesla won’t sue if someone else makes an adapter in good faith.

    If it’s a good business, and many people want one, offer it.
  • @mkeaton1967,
    That is a great idea. Clearly, however, you're new to this EV game.
    Unfortunately, CCS was developed by the ICE-dominated SAE with the primary intent to hinder Tesla and deter EVs. They delayed the final ratification of the CCS and J-1772 standards when Tesla had cars ready to deliver and, they were pushing for low-speed (50 kW) max charging speed to ensure that one not charge at more than ~200 mph. These issues were, naturally, unacceptable to Tesla so Tesla chose to go it alone.
    The lasting issue preventing what you suggest is that the CCS Standard, when it finally was ratified, specifically prohibits the use of any sort of adapters -- another move to bifurcate the charging industry.
    Tesla offered to share its network and standard if a manufacture is willing to help fund its rollout. Nobody has answered their offer.
    There is a legitimate technical challenge with an adapter for higher speeds as well: higher speed chargers such as Tesla's 250 kW and CCS 250 kW chargers require cooling of the connector pins. Carrying this cooling capability across the connector would be extremely expensive, bulky, and clumsy. An adapter would probably limit one to about 50 kW which still might be ok for some situations.
    A serious charging station manufacturer would put another cable with a Tesla connector on their CCS station. There are a few EVgo stations that have done this. I hope this spreads but so far, we haven't seen any growth of that capability.
  • > @"Earl and Nagin 08 RDS 359" said: > The lasting issue preventing what you suggest is that the CCS Standard, when it finally was ratified, specifically prohibits the use of any sort of adapters.

    Except it doesn't.

    As Tesla itself noted in offering to supply a US CCS adapter.
  • @mkeaton1967,

    Don't be fooled by the post above. Tesla has neither offered a CCS type I adapter, nor has it noted anything about the IEC standard, 61851-1, which prohibits them at the vehicle inlet. What the standard allows is an adapter at the outlet of a charging station.

    This is the pertinent section: https://i.imgur.com/JyQNkeJ.png

    As I noted earlier, Tesla is unlikely to violate that standard unless forced to by a higher authority, e.g., a government. A cleaner solution is what @"Earl and Nagin 08 RDS 359" suggested: having stations add cables or, if they can't, convert one. Electrify America would sell a lot more energy if they had CCS and Tesla connectors than CCS and Chademo.
  • Yes, we need an adapter. I made a trip from Portland Oregon to Atlanta Georgia in a Chevy bolt last year before I got my model y. It was, interesting? I have no real love for Electrify America but there are places where they would come in very handy in the Tesla. Tesla is supposed to be testing a CCS adapter in Korea from what I've heard on the internet, but sorry I can't remember where I heard it.
  • Yes, all EV chargers should be able to be used by all EV's, period. It's like a ______ (insert brand of car) not being able to go to ______ (insert brand of gas station). Kind of crazy sounding when it's put that way, right.
  • Including diesel?
  • > @bassbone1_98264787 said:
    > Yes, all EV chargers should be able to be used by all EV's, period. It's like a ______ (insert brand of car) not being able to go to ______ (insert brand of gas station). Kind of crazy sounding when it's put that way, right.

    I appreciate the feedback and perspective that everyone has shared. More options for charging is good for everyone.

    And charging at a 250kw CCS Charger with adaptor is better than charging at a 50kw CHAdeMO Charger using the Tesla to CHAdeMO adapter.

    Thanks, have a very happy Thanksgiving!
  • If there is a market someone will make it..We are all early adopters and as the market grows there will be complete compatibility adaptors for all platforms.
  • Hopefully they will be easy to use like the Tesla Network, plug N charge with no BS like per minute billing and no credit card hassles
  • > @ExBMET said: Tesla is supposed to be testing a CCS adapter in Korea from what I've heard on the internet, but sorry I can't remember where I heard it."

    Korea will force the issue as they have US CCS plug as country's standard and Tesla will be forced to adapt. Once the Korean's are making the adapter, we can get it in US.
  • Korea won’t need an adapter. It’ll be the native plug on the car. Why do you play stupid?
  • edited November 2020
    > @lbowroom said:
    > Korea won’t need an adapter. It’ll be the native plug on the car. Why do you play stupid?

    Because it's easier than playing the opposite?
  • > @lbowroom said: > Korea won’t need an adapter. It’ll be the native plug on the car. Why do you play stupid?”

    Older S, X and 3’s in country just as in EU so Tesla had to make adapters. Tesla still sells the adapter in EU for $200.

    https://electrek.co/2020/08/12/tesla-slashes-price-ccs-retrofit-model-s-x/

    https://electrek.co/2019/05/07/tesla-ccs-adapter-model-s-x-retrofits/

    https://www.tesla.com/support/tesla-ccs-combo-2-manuals

    Always a topic on all Tesla forums with many owners seeing the sense of it and asking for it with vague Tesla promise to provide so Teslas could charge on any major system.

    https://teslamotorsclub.com/tmc/threads/ccs-adapter-for-north-america.165490/

    Since Tesla makes the unique plug it is on Tesla to match the world’s standards which it has proven it can do easily with the $200 adapter.
  • Who does it benefit to spin these fantastic distortions of reality?
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > Oh baby!
    >
    > Yes we do but Tesla is making big revenue and profits from charging now so it wants to keep its captive market.
    >
    > The CCS adapter in EU costs $200 and Tesla should provide it in US.

    Different market. The EU (including the UK when it was a member) adopted CCS as a standard for public charge points provision. All new DC charge stations have to have CCS (they can have other connectors as well, but must have CCS). The Model 3 in Europe uses CCS as standard. All superchargers have been fitted with CCS.

    Model 3s in Europe are compatible with nearly all public charge points (AC and DC). The only exception being done early ones that didn’t have CCS pre-standardisation. Build out of superchargers is, as I understand it, more challenging in some markets due to local regulations - we’ve been waiting for a few, so the ability to use any public charge point is a big benefit in the UK. I really enjoy the flexibility - supercharger for quick rest breaks on motorways, local CCS (or Type 2 AC) at a hotel/restaurant/supermarket/car park/shopping centre.

    Makes sense to offer a cheap adaptor for non-CCS Teslas in Europe due to the wider standardisation.

    Whether Telsa “should” offer on other local markets would depend on a combination of the level of local standardisation, availability of infrastructure and planning rules to allow expansion.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > it is on Tesla to match the world’s standards
    >

    As I understand it there is no single global standard. Tesla does localise the cars for local markets where there is standardisation.

    Europe (without being political) has a history of standardisation with a declared goal of creating a market and helping consumers to buy from multiple sources. Other local markets choose different standards.

    One of the early perceived barriers to EVs was the multiple different (and quickly evolving) charging standards and the many networks needing different apps and RFID cars.

    In Europe there has been a move to agreeing a common denominator for charging and, certainly in the UK, there now needs to be provision for contactless payment (or similar) so that you drive up and use any charger - it’s all part of driving CO2 reductio.and also, as we now know, the move to EVs also pushes down Nitrogen Dioxide and particulate emissions for which there is increasing evidence of harm to health and, more recently, an increase in the impact of Covid.

    My point is that, much as they have helped create the EV market and made EVs a highly desirable choice, it is not for Tesla to drive global (or local market) standards, that is a job for regulators. EVs are known to be beneficial to health and the environment. Governments and local regulators can do a lot to help the transition, standards being one element.
  • > @andy_uk_3_Owner said: > Different market."

    Exact same market really for US and Korea vs. EU. Except in US and Korea it includes Model 3's so more financial incentive for Tesla selling a $20 part for $200. In Korea, the newer Model 3's will have the US CCS adapter built in.

    That also means Tesla is building the CCS1 socket in the car which is the same tech as building a CCS1 adapter for cars with the Tesla socket.

    "CCS1 and CCS2 share the design of the DC pins as well as the communications protocols, therefore it is a simple option for manufacturers to swap the AC plug section for Type 1 in the US and (potentially) Japan for Type 2 for other markets."

    https://thedriven.io/2018/12/10/what-is-ccs-charging/
  • Tesla supplied everything that I need to keep my M3 charged up at home, work, and, on the go.

    No other adapter required.
  • Between charging at home, the range of the vehicle, and supercharger network, this is incredibly unnecessary, and a waste of Tesla's talent.
  • “ In Korea, the newer Model 3's will have the US CCS adapter built in”

    Can you please use the word adapter correctly in a sentence.

    No such thing as a built in adapter. CCS1 as the native connector is not an adapter.
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