Model 3

2020 M3 battery range

The stated range on my new M3 is 263, however the highest range my battery will charge to is 237. I traded a 2018 M3 for a 2020 to get the improved range but my car is not getting that upgrade.

Anyone else having this issue?

Comments

  • The stated range on my new M3 is 263, however the highest range my battery will charge to is 237. I traded a 2018 M3 for a 2020 to get the improved range but my car is not getting that upgrade.

    Anyone else having this issue?
  • Your question was already answered in your previous thread.

    https://forums.tesla.com/discussion/178995/2020-battery-range

    The rated range of your car is 250 miles and not 263. The 2021 model has the 263 mile range. As far as your range, your car is fine. Please search the archives and read any of the countless threads on this topic. The battery meter range is just an estimate that will be influenced by external factors such as temperature and is subject to miscalibration. If you charge to 100% and drive to depletion while matching the rated efficiency (wh/mi), you should achieve approximately the rated range of the car.

    https://www.tesla.com/support/range
  • sorry, I did not see my post go up yesterday.

    So the battery has changed in the last 2 months?
  • 2020 SR+ has a rated range of 250 miles. 2021 SR+ has a rated range of 263 miles. I’m not sure what the differences are. It is possible that your car being a late 2020 model may have some or all of the improvements, but they won’t update the rated range mid model year.
  • Plain and simple, when my batter is full I never see a range of 250 or 263. I get that my actual range differs considerably from the stated but I would assume that what my battery range show is what I would get under "IDEAL" driving behaviour. So Like the stated range my actual range is based on the same driving assumptions. Hence, they are comparable numbers.
  • Again, just use the search feature as your question has been asked and answered countless times. Measuring SOC and issuable battery capacity is notoriously difficult. It is not as simple as sticking a float in a gas tank. Your battery meter range is just an estimate and is not very precise. For that matter how accurate do you think your fuel gauge is when it just shows 1/4, 1/2, 3/4, and full? The battery meter range estimate is not an indicator of battery health.

    https://www.tesla.com/support/range
  • Typically if anyone else gets a brand new Tesla and the range at 100% charge is much less than the "rated range" they call Tesla. Have you tried calling Tesla?
  • yes, I have spent an hour on the phone with two different people and got two different answers which were both not helpful and assurance that someone who could answer the question would call me...but they didn't. I am on my 3rd Tesla and I love the cars but dealing with service and sales people is horrific.

    Regarding Stingray's comment. If Tesla states a range for the vehicle they should provide a car that offers that range. You can get bogged down in the engineering gobble goo answers but I would bet that the estimate that Tesla provides overstates the actual range. If you did a sample of enough M3s I doubt the Mean range would be their stated range. If the mean was 263 that would imply for every car (like mine) getting 237 there has to be a car out there getting 290......or 3 cars getting 9 over the mean. That what the mean is...a weighted average.
  • “ If Tesla states a range for the vehicle they should provide a car that offers that range.”
    ________

    Your car has a rated range of 250 miles. Once again, If you charge the car to 100%, drive to depletion while achieving the rated efficiency (wh/mi), you should get approximately 250 miles REGARDLESS of what the battery meter range estimate (AKA guess-o-meter) states.

    The mean range of drivers has nothing to do rated range. Tesla does not even determine rated range (although they can under represent the rated range). Rated range is determined by the appropriate regulatory agency (EPA in the U.S.). They determine rated range by charging the car to 100% and driving to depletion while mimicking a combination of highway and city driving. Your car has a rated efficiency (again determined by the EPA) which is represented on the “rated” line on the energy graph on the UI. The battery meter estimates the state of charge and usable battery capacity to determine approximately how far one could drive at the rated that efficiency. However, battery capacity is affected by temperature. Additionally, the battery meter is prone to miscalibration (see the many past threads on how to recalibrate the BMS). Keep in mind that the car has a bottom end buffer of about 5% that is not included in the battery meter range estimate. Thus, your battery meter range of 237 vs 250 is not that far off.
  • Here is evidence of the 5% bottom buffer that is not included in the battery meter range estimate.

    https://mobile.twitter.com/greentheonly/status/1293994726270664704
  • Third Tesla, not getting rated range, service horrific...
    How far behind are you in your short position?
  • Magic 8 shill

    I have a problem with my vehicle and the service happens to be as bad as it gets. MY initial question to the forum "is anyone having this (range) issue".....and the shills wade in. Not one constructive comment related to my question.

    You and Stingray have matching pom poms.
  • I spent time addressing your concern. Why the hostility? If you would scroll the dozens of threads on this topic, you would see that what you are reporting is normal. I even provided evidence of the 5% bottom end buffer that is not included in the battery meter range estimate. 5% of your rated range of 250 miles is 13 miles. You are reporting a shortage of 13 miles. Your missing 13 miles is in the bottom end buffer. Have you ever seen an ICE car gas gauge run below the E Mark? Same concept applies. Regardless, don’t read too much into the battery meter range estimate, as it is imprecise and is not an indicator of battery health. There’s nothing wrong with your car. Change the display to percentage and enjoy the car.
  • I can assure you that no one will feed back some magic way to get your issue resolved without having you work with Tesla directly. I honestly cannot see what other help/advice you can expect to get other than work with Tesla on the issue.
  • longislandelectric, nothing is wrong. The weather got colder during the last 2 months. The EPA determines the range value, not Tesla. The 2021 Tesla standard range has an ETA range of 263 miles. The 2020 Tesla standard range (which you said you got) does not get that. The 2021 Tesla standard range that gets an ETA range of 263 is the one with the Aero wheels, not the one with the 19" wheels choice.
  • While this won’t explain a perceived 13 mile loss, but just to touch upon something in7 said. In the summer 80% SOC will display “x” miles, but then come winter 80% will display a lower number.

    Did your previous 2 Teslas display exactly the range they were rated for?

    Lastly, if you have had two other Teslas and this “issue” is very common amongst all of us, how is it seemingly a mystery, that warrants a solicitation for advice from us?
  • longislandelectric, this YouTube video will explain what you need to do. It's Kim Java's video called "How Tesla Wants You to Charge in 2020". https://youtu.be/MrwmNKtnh84
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