Model 3

Buying a Model 3 with no home charging?

I'm considering buying one. In constant warmer weather areas, it's reasonable without a home charger. Unfortunately I live on the East Coast and in a complex that doesn't have a garage or home charging. So I won't be able to plug it in every night to keep the battery warm. I have plenty of EV chargers and a few superchargers near me.

I'm just wondering if it'd be alright getting a M3 relying solely on outside charging during winter (January through mid March) and a bit of snow, for a couple months. Or would that degredate the battery/car in general?

Comments

  • Do you have charging at work? I wouldn't buy an EV unless I had convenient charging.
  • So you have no access to even a 120 outlet? The car being plugged in isn’t keep the battery warm. It is only when it is charging that it gets heated up.

    If you can’t charge even with a 120 outlet, then you will be fine using the superchargers, though I wouldn’t do that every day. Do expect to have your regen limited on a regular basis, during the cooler months. I am in CT and the regen limitations “season” has already started.
  • > @bjrosen said:
    > Do you have charging at work? I wouldn't buy an EV unless I had convenient charging.

    Unfortunately, there's none at my workplace. It's only 15 miles from where I live. There are plenty of EV stations and a supercharger on the way to and from it.> @jordanrichard_629778 said:
    > So you have no access to even a 120 outlet? The car being plugged in isn’t keep the battery warm. It is only when it is charging that it gets heated up.
    >
    > If you can’t charge even with a 120 outlet, then you will be fine using the superchargers, though I wouldn’t do that every day. Do expect to have your regen limited on a regular basis, during the cooler months. I am in CT and the regen limitations “season” has already started.
  • @rae0219 Where would you plan on charging on a regular basis and how close are the nearest L2 & L3 chargers from your home ?
    Without knowing the answers to those questions, it is hard to offer an opinion.
  • > @rae0219 said:
    > > @bjrosen said:
    > > Do you have charging at work? I wouldn't buy an EV unless I had convenient charging.
    >
    > Unfortunately, there's none at my workplace. It's only 15 miles from where I live. There are plenty of EV stations and a supercharger on the way to and from it.>.

    @rae0219, I would wait until a convenient charging option becomes available.
    The convenience of charging at home and/or work in one of the benefits of owning an EV.
  • > @jordanrichard_629778 said:
    > So you have no access to even a 120 outlet? The car being plugged in isn’t keep the battery warm. It is only when it is charging that it gets heated up.
    >
    > If you can’t charge even with a 120 outlet, then you will be fine using the superchargers, though I wouldn’t do that every day. Do expect to have your regen limited on a regular basis, during the cooler months. I am in CT and the regen limitations “season” has already started.

    I do. Its in front of the place, but there's a big lawn between the outlet and the parking space so I'd have to use an extension cord which I know isn't a good idea. So that's why I put it as no home charging.

    I won't be supercharging/charging it everyday. Only when it needs charging, around 40%-50%. I don't drive far or often for work or to go to the stores, so I'm not too concerned about mileage or range.
  • Is the Supercharger next to a supermarket? With a 15 mile commute you will only need to Supercharge once a week, if it can be combined with your shopping then it won't be an inconvenience.
  • > @mrburke said:
    > @rae0219 Where would you plan on charging on a regular basis and how close are the nearest L2 & L3 chargers from your home ?
    > Without knowing the answers to those questions, it is hard to offer an opinion.

    I don't plan on charging daily. Wouldn't need to.

    I have over 20 L2 chargers within a 5 miles radius. About 10 L3 within the same radius. Two tesla superchargers, one 3 miles and one 6 miles away. And 3 Tesla destination chargers at 3, 5 and 8 miles away. So I'm pretty set on charging stations.

    I just want to know if not being able to charge the M3 overnight during cold weather/snow season, and relying on outside charging (not daily), is alright to the car and won't degrade/mess up the battery overall.
  • I'd had my M3 for 2 years with no home charging. I was doing the supercharger thing about once a week (that's with a daily commute). Granted, no snow, but around freezing temperatures. I would say it's more convenient to have home charging, but not a strict requirement. (I did live in a major metro area, so lots of chargers around. I've since moved and now have access to home charging.)
  • > @andre_98041166 said:
    > I'd had my M3 for 2 years with no home charging. I was doing the supercharger thing about once a week (that's with a daily commute). Granted, no snow, but around freezing temperatures. I would say it's more convenient to have home charging, but not a strict requirement. (I did live in a major metro area, so lots of chargers around. I've since moved and now have access to home charging.)

    That's definitely nice to know! My commute isn't far about 15-20 miles to work places and the supermarkets and stores are even closer. I don't intend on going into downtown or inner city trips during winter season, so there's no worries there. Snow is maybe less than an inch to a few inches these past few years. Not like over half a foot or anything.
  • I have no home charging, live in Pacific NW, so cool to colder temps and rain all which drag on battery range.

    It works well for me and I drive about 25,000 miles a year with one commute 100 miles roundtrip.

    It all depends on your distribution of super chargers. I have one 2 miles work, one 8 miles from home, one 12 miles from home. I have one 18 miles from Summer shore spot which is 100 miles from the house. One 50 miles right, in between house and shore and one 40 miles from home which is 20 miles downhill from ski area.

    I have a Chademo adapter so I can use Electrify America and EVgo 50 kW chargers in a pinch. One at the shore spot. One a mile from the house. One 10 miles from ski area.

    You have to be tolerant of frequent charging of 20-40 minutes. In Winter on the 100 mile commute, I'll have to charge every day to get to work, home and back to work next morning.

    I pack my iPad so the time goes quickly.

    So key is check the charger locations for where you will be driving frequently.
  • > @rae0219 said:

    >"......there's a big lawn between the outlet and the parking space so I'd have to use an extension cord which I know isn't a good idea. So that's why I put it as no home charging."

    I've used an extension cord for a long time, and so have some others owners. Use 10 gauge extension cord for 240v, and use 12 gauge extension cord for 120v. It's not the best solution, but it's a whole lot better than "no home charging".
  • Fish is present. Fish is drawn to newbies like flies to honey. Public Service Announcement:
    FISHEV is a known troll of several years standing and several user
    names who pushes an anti Tesla narrative. Please
    take his opinions with a grain of salt, avoid any advice he may
    suggest, and do not let him implant any Fear, Uncertainty, or Doubt
    about Tesla or your car into your own opinion.
    It's not worth reading FISH's stuff because, well, he/she/it lies a _lot_. And tells the truth sometimes; but it's not worth anybody's time trying to parse its spew.

    To answer the original question: With that many L2/L3 chargers around you and a short commute, my opinion would be to Go For It.
    By the by: One _can_ use an extension cord. Just don't get one from Home Depot or the local grocery store. Those say things like, "heavy duty", but that mainly means they use more insulation. Insulation is cheap but doesn't carry current; with the thin wires they put in those things, there's a significant voltage drop when a Tesla tries to charge at full (12A at 120 VAC) load; the Tesla detects that and drops the charge current. In cold weather, there won't be enough to charge the car.
    Instead, go to Harbor Freight or similar and get the length cord you want there, and make sure it's rated for 15A. The longer the cable, the heavier gauge wire they use, and, because copper is more expensive than insulation, that kind of extension cord will be more expensive. The good news: It can go into the well in the back of the car when you're not using it. I've got a 20' one that works fine and does the full current.
  • > @rae0219 said:> I have over 20 L2 chargers within a 5 miles radius."

    Those are much too slow for anything but overnight charging and even that is problematic if it is cold.

    > I just want to know if not being able to charge the M3 overnight during cold weather/snow season, and relying on outside charging (not daily), is alright to the car and won't degrade/mess up the battery overall."

    Using the fast chargers all the time especially if you are doing it every two-three days and consequently doing larger discharge/charge cycles 10%-80% will degrade the battery faster.

    It will not hurt it.

    I've got about 5% battery degradation after 18 months from a similar charging sequence. It won't mess it up but you will have higher batter degradation.

    Here's a report from Battery Health app showing where my Model 3's battery degradation is vs. other owners.

    https://imgur.com/vQwhJlO
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