Model 3

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Wall socket is NEMA 10-30R for my dryer. Will 10-30 adapter work or cause problems?

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Comments

  • To add to Bighorn, I have three Teslas '14 S 83k, '15 S 72k, '18 3 82k, I've had the 12v replaced three times total on the S's, once out of warranty done by mobile service for about $160. Each time the car gave plenty of warning. I've only had one service for my 3 to replace an autopilot camera also done quickly and easily under warranty by mobile service.

    As for adequacy of 24 amp charging, even though I have three wall connectors capable of 40 amps or more, I purposely reduce the charge current to 30 amps to save wear and tear and that is more than adequate even when my daughter was commuting 120-150 miles a day. I installed the wall connectors for convenience and I did the work myself so it was cheap.
  • I’ve never had a vehicle go over 300k miles before. Expenses are less than what our Ford F-350 needed in one third the miles. Battery and drive unit are covered through 8 years/unlimited miles, so I’ve not been exposed to any risk there.
    AWD often don’t need a tire rotation and I’ve gotten out of the habit of doing them. Just track the tread depths. I drive around 80k miles a year between the two cars, so mileage triggers for fluid changes haven’t come into play. Don’t know what the current recommendations are for fluid changes, as they seem subject to change. Only brake fluid change I’ve had came up with a caliper change well after 200k miles on the S.
  • @Nulight: First off, welcome to the forums. Second: "Bighorn is always right." Third: With respect to 2V batteries, we got the following:
    1. It's not your standard, deep draw, ICE-starter lead-acid battery of yore. It's this zero-maintenance Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) battery. Its purpose in life is not to run a starter, it's to power up the computers, lights, and radio.
    2. As it happens, in this household, the Other Car is a Gen 3 Prius, which, seeing as it doesn't have a conventional starter for the ICE, uses an AGM-style battery for pretty much the same reasons that a Tesla does: Powers the computers, lights, and radio.
    3. About 1.5 years after getting the Prius, that AGM battery died. I got the SO to show up with jumper cables (yes, one can jump a Prius 12V battery), got the car started, and drove it straight to an Advanced auto, where I bought and installed a replacement. That was in 2nd quarter 2011; it's now 2020, and that replacement battery is working just fine.
    4. There was a burst of deader 12V batteries on Tesla in 2019. Based upon comments made by Tesla employees and reported here, it appears that Tesla ended up with a, how shall we call it, a pallet or dozen of not-such-great batteries. Tesla hasn't been stinting on replacing these batteries when they come up bad; reports are that the mobile techs can get one swapped out in ten minutes or so.
    5. Having said that, it appears that infant mortality on these types of batteries isn't a new thing: See #3. And, from what I've seen around here, one gets fair warning when a battery's going bad.
    6. Finally, it's occasionally not the battery, per se. Loose charging cables, bad DC-DC converters down-converting from the traction battery to the 12V batter, etc., can wreck the charging of said batteries. Near as I can tell, the vast majority of people with Teslas don't have 12V problems; most of what you see around here is the usual Squeaking Wheel issues. (That is: People with problems show up here. People without problems don't.)
    Relax, enjoy your Tesla.
  • @Nulight,

    I've got 70K miles on our Model 3 and 65K miles on our '08 Roadster. The Roadster was perfect up until recently when we had to replace the Power Electronics Module. Keep in mind that this was the 359th car that Tesla had ever built. The Model 3 greatly improves on everything about the car. We've had nothing done to it except for buying tires. If you're careful, you can get 30K to 40K miles from a set of tires on the standard, probably less on the performance models or if you do jackrabbit starts at every opportunity.
    I used the NEMA 6-30 (cheaper 30-amp outlet) that was in our garage when we bought the house for the first 6 years of ownership. Today, I use a NEMA 14-50 but usually charge at least than 20 amps since I've often got the Roadster sharing the 50 amp breaker with the Model 3. For about 6 months, I even managed with a 16 amp 120 volt outlet at a rented apartment but will admit that was not convenient. A 14-30 would work fine for every EV driver I've known. With Superchargers as a backup for unexpected long trips, it is even more suitable.
  • > @Tronguy said:
    > @Nulight: First off, welcome to the forums. Second: "Bighorn is always right." Third: With respect to 2V batteries, we got the following:
    > 1. It's not your standard, deep draw, ICE-starter lead-acid battery of yore. It's this zero-maintenance Absorbed Glass Mat (AGM) battery. Its purpose in life is not to run a starter, it's to power up the computers, lights, and radio.
    > 2. As it happens, in this household, the Other Car is a Gen 3 Prius, which, seeing as it doesn't have a conventional starter for the ICE, uses an AGM-style battery for pretty much the same reasons that a Tesla does: Powers the computers, lights, and radio.
    > 3. About 1.5 years after getting the Prius, that AGM battery died. I got the SO to show up with jumper cables (yes, one can jump a Prius 12V battery), got the car started, and drove it straight to an Advanced auto, where I bought and installed a replacement. That was in 2nd quarter 2011; it's now 2020, and that replacement battery is working just fine.
    > 4. There was a burst of deader 12V batteries on Tesla in 2019. Based upon comments made by Tesla employees and reported here, it appears that Tesla ended up with a, how shall we call it, a pallet or dozen of not-such-great batteries. Tesla hasn't been stinting on replacing these batteries when they come up bad; reports are that the mobile techs can get one swapped out in ten minutes or so.
    > 5. Having said that, it appears that infant mortality on these types of batteries isn't a new thing: See #3. And, from what I've seen around here, one gets fair warning when a battery's going bad.
    > 6. Finally, it's occasionally not the battery, per se. Loose charging cables, bad DC-DC converters down-converting from the traction battery to the 12V batter, etc., can wreck the charging of said batteries. Near as I can tell, the vast majority of people with Teslas don't have 12V problems; most of what you see around here is the usual Squeaking Wheel issues. (That is: People with problems show up here. People without problems don't.)
    > Relax, enjoy your Tesla.

    Thanks for the info. I ordered mine on Nov 23rd, now waiting for it to come.. Estimated 22-31 of dec.
  • Minor points for you.
    1. Charging port on the Tesla is the left rear. If the NEMA10-30 isn't close, you may need an extension cord. If you get one, make sure it's got the gauge to handle the current; many cheaper cords don't have the moxie.
    2. With or without that, you could always move the socket to a handier place. Electricians won't usually break the bank for something like that.
    3. Check out https://shop.tesla.com/product/gen-2-nema-adapters; a NEMA10-30 on the Tesla Mobile Connector (TMC) will get you 22 miles of charge per hour. Note: You get home from your day job at, say, 6 p.m. and leave the car parked until you leave at 7 a.m. the next day. That's 13 hours; at 22 MoCpH, that's 286 miles of charge. With a 70 mile commute, you're not going to have problems.
    4. It's your call, of course: But I'd suggest getting a second Gen 2 TMC and leave it plugged in, permanently, with the one that comes with the car left in the well in the rear. That way, If Something Comes Up, you won't have to swing by the house to pick up the charger, or have to go through the (admittedly minor) hassle of pulling the TMC out of the car, plugging it into the house and car, and reversing the process when you leave for work every day. A second one is still cheaper than the TWC (Tesla Wall Connector).
    5. Weirdly enough, the TWC, for the power level it can supply, is actually cheaper than all or at least most of its competitors. You said you're not doing this (well, not paying $500 for a box you don't actually need is fine), but thought you might find it interesting.
    Out of sheer curiosity, what type of M3 are you getting? SR+, LR, P?
  • > @Tronguy said:
    > Minor points for you.
    > 1. Charging port on the Tesla is the left rear. If the NEMA10-30 isn't close, you may need an extension cord. If you get one, make sure it's got the gauge to handle the current; many cheaper cords don't have the moxie.
    > 2. With or without that, you could always move the socket to a handier place. Electricians won't usually break the bank for something like that.
    > 3. Check out https://shop.tesla.com/product/gen-2-nema-adapters; a NEMA10-30 on the Tesla Mobile Connector (TMC) will get you 22 miles of charge per hour. Note: You get home from your day job at, say, 6 p.m. and leave the car parked until you leave at 7 a.m. the next day. That's 13 hours; at 22 MoCpH, that's 286 miles of charge. With a 70 mile commute, you're not going to have problems.
    > 4. It's your call, of course: But I'd suggest getting a second Gen 2 TMC and leave it plugged in, permanently, with the one that comes with the car left in the well in the rear. That way, If Something Comes Up, you won't have to swing by the house to pick up the charger, or have to go through the (admittedly minor) hassle of pulling the TMC out of the car, plugging it into the house and car, and reversing the process when you leave for work every day. A second one is still cheaper than the TWC (Tesla Wall Connector).
    > 5. Weirdly enough, the TWC, for the power level it can supply, is actually cheaper than all or at least most of its competitors. You said you're not doing this (well, not paying $500 for a box you don't actually need is fine), but thought you might find it interesting.
    > Out of sheer curiosity, what type of M3 are you getting? SR+, LR, P?

    1. I can easily reach this if I back into the garage, it'll be close if I pull in forward. May end up backing into one until I either buy an extension cable or get a connection through my dad(he's a general contractor and has electrician connections).
    2.May end up doing this, the location is only convenient if backing into the garage.
    3. I already have the 10-30 adapter sitting in my house, bought it a few days ago, but was getting flustered with the 24A(on adapter) vs. the 30A in the socket. My commute is maybe 50 miles tops, so I should be fine charging it in the evening(but it's best to keep them charged at all times when possible, no?)
    4. I'll consider this possibly after my tax return.
    5. May end up going this route if my dads electrician connection ends up being very cheap, but then again, he could easily have something more efficient than a 10-30 installed.

    I'm buying the M3 SR+. I wish I could afford the LR, but I just recently got a house this year, thanks to pandemic interest rates.
  • Can I buy a Nema 14-30 adapter from Tesla?
  • jttennis26, yes, see https://shop.tesla.com/product/gen-2-nema-adapters
  • GHammer, a NEMA 10-30 socket is capable of 30 amps at the max, however the car will only draw 24 amps from that, just to be safe with the continuous load. It's a possible house fire risk to draw more than 24 amps from that NEMA 10-30.
    If you're going to use an extension cord, get a 10 gauge cord. Call up and talk to the sales guy at EVSEadapters.com and he'll know what to recommend to you. I've had a good experience with them.
  • @Nulight welcome to the EV world! You are right to do your research but don’t overdue it. My rule of thumb, far more people post about having problems on the internet than post about not having problems. Enjoy the car.
  • zerogravitydrgn, I wish to report that I'm not having any problems with the car. I'm just having fun. :-)
  • > @in7_98388832 said:
    > GHammer, a NEMA 10-30 socket is capable of 30 amps at the max

    Not in the context of this discussion. With 15 years of experience with high current, high voltage electronics, I am fully aware of the concept of peak vs. continuous.
  • You may want to get one of these,
    https://www.getneocharge.com/shop-pages/appliance-smart-splitter-3

    It will allow you to share the plug with your dryer. It's $500, the same price as a Tesla Wall Connector, but it will save you the cost of an electrician. Personally I'd have a dedicated 240V line and a Wall Connector installed because it will allow you to charge at a higher current than 24A which is what you'll get with a 30A like. My electrician charged me $750 to run a 60A line and install my Wall Connector.
  • Wow. @Nulight responded, and I never noticed. Well, I've been ill for a couple of weeks.
    Just for verisimilitude: The National Electric Code very definitely states that that if one has a socket rated for, say, 30A, with a 30A breaker, and wire rated for 30A, then the maximum draw with a fixed load on said socket is 80% of that, or 24A. Hence, if one looks at a more-or-less bog-standard 120 VAC 15A circuit, with a 15A breaker on it, one is not supposed to draw more than 80% of 15A, or 12A, on that circuit. Which is why a Tesla car combined with the Tesla Mobile Connector (TMC) with the 120 VAC NEMA5-15 adapter won't draw more than 12A. Just so we're clear, this is all for Safety and Lack of Fire reasons.
    The other socket one sees in common use with Teslas is the NEMA14-50. That's a socket for 240 VAC whose maximum is 50A; however, there's an addendum in the NEC stating that it's legal (!) to wire it up for clothes drier purposes to a 40A circuit/circuit breaker. Since Tesla doesn't know if there's a 50A or 40A breaker out there, in the interests of Not Catching The House On Fire, it limits current draw on such a connector to 80% of 40A, or 32A.
  • I'd used a NEMA 6-30 plug for a while. I suppose something that I'd heard is that one's dryer socket might not be rated for repeated plug-in and unplug cycles (after all, how often does one unplug one's dryer normally). Please look around to verify.
  • There is also a product known as Dryer Buddy which will share the electrical outlet with your dryer. It is also worth checking out. You can see it over here: https://www.bsaelectronics.com/collections/dryer-buddys
  • > @Nulight said:
    >...but was getting flustered with the 24A(on adapter) vs. the 30A in the socket....but it's best to keep them charged at all times when possible, no?)

    Well, not really. Plug it in at night and don’t about it.

    LiIon cells are happiest when they’re half charged, but the difference between staying at 50% charge and staying at, say, 80% charge is insignificant.
    Staying at 100% charge doesn’t make them happy; If you need 100% charge for a a long day or trip, it’s no big deal, set your charge level to 100% the night before and go driving. If your trip gets canceled, be sure to drive the car enough to get the battery level below 90%.
    In general. Set your charge level to 80 or 90%, plug it in every night (or before it gets below, say, 20% if possible), and just don’t worry about it. Tesla has world-class engineers putting the world’s best battery management capabilities into the car to take care of the battery so you don’t have to.
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