Model 3

My Model 3 is suddenly heavy on the breaks and heavy on the acceleration.

I've had my M3 for 2 years and definitely know how my car feels. I let my Girlfriend drive it for the first time last night and something happened... I'm not sure if it is because I created a profile for her driving comfort, or maybe she touched something she wasn't meant to. But now my M3 feels like there is resistance on my Acceleration and Brakes. The regenerative braking isn't gradual anymore it feels like a sudden halt, It feels like something is resisting me driving the car; The acceleration and brakes pedals are heavy. Anyone have an Idea? I checked the parking brake on the touch screen and it's listed as "off".

Comments

  • Another thought would be a sticking brake caliper.
  • Have you checked the "driving" screen?
  • > @Pepperidge said:
    > Have you checked the "driving" screen?

    Well new UI has small font so he most likely can't see it. /s
  • I second the comment about a stuck brake caliper.
  • In 2018, when Tesla Model 3's were new, there were a number of threads about sticking brake calipers and how to get them greased. That's died down over the years, presumably because Tesla Did Something to address the issue.
    I dunno: Being really careful, take the car for a straight run for a couple of miles, then, with a finger, see how hot all those disks are. If there's one that makes on yell, "Ouch!", and the others are cool... Be Careful.
  • > @AmokTime said:
    > I second the comment about a stuck brake caliper.

    A stuck brake caliper would produce a distinct odor after a drive. Can you detect a difference if you set regen to low?
  • Might be difficult to detect the brake odor over the “old encyclopedia” smell of the cabin heat.
  • > @AmokTime said:
    > Might be difficult to detect the brake odor over the “old encyclopedia” smell of the cabin heat.

    I have no such cabin odor, you should change your cabin filters. The brake odor would be outside the car and easily detectable after a continuous drive of say 15 minutes. You would also hear the disc making a crackling noise as it cools down after the drive.
  • > @HAL2001 said: > Can you detect a difference if you set regen to low?"

    Probably better to set the braking "Roll" and see if the car rolls easily vs. trying to distinguish levels of regen.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > Probably better to set the braking "Roll" and see if the car rolls easily vs. trying to distinguish levels of regen.
    >

    Setting regen to low on my M3 LR is an extremely different feel and is very noticeable. Roll would tell him nothing as regen will engage long before it slows enough and then you will need to be on a hill to see if it will roll. If you want to see if the car moves easily, engage tow mode (with a safety driver, on level ground) and push it, but the car is so heavy I doubt that will provide enough feedback.
  • > @HAL2001 said: Roll would tell him nothing as regen will engage long before it slows enough and then you will need to be on a hill to see if it will roll."

    It would tell if a brake is stuck. You don't need a hill and in fact want to do it on a flat terrain.
  • If you have a touchless thermometer or willing to sacrifice a digit, drive for a bit, feel resistance, come to stop NOT using brakes, get out and touch all the rotors. If any are hot, a caliper is sticking, if not, look elsewhere.

    Also, check weather and state of charge. If you usually drive at higher percentages, it could be possible you've gotten used to reduced regen and the new issue has full, "normal" regen. Look at the dots on the screen to know for sure.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > It would tell if a brake is stuck. You don't need a hill and in fact want to do it on a flat terrain.

    How would regen bringing the car to a complete stop on flat terrain indicate to the driver if a brake is stuck?
  • In my my experience, a stuck caliper should cause the car to pull to that side when driving in a straight line. That should be easily noticeable. I’ve had this happen a couple of times on my old Triumph Spitfire. It wasn’t subtle.
  • As to touching the rotor to see if it's hot; start at the outside of the rim by the tire and work your way in if necessary.

    Last time I had a caliper stick (not on my Tesla), the rim was very warm to the touch. I would have left skin on the rotor had I touched that.
  • When the rotors are that hot you can hear them crackle as they cool. No need to touch them.
Sign In or Register to comment.