Model 3

2021 Model 3 Long range 353 miles at 100% charge

Took delivery of 2021 M3 LR in UK on Dec 21st. I am seeing a 100% charge range of 338 miles. Is anyone seeing 353 miles?
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Comments

  • My 2018 was advertised to get 310 miles at full charge. It never got that. Now its down to 280. Are you actually charging it to 100% or just extrapolating from a lower charge? Unfortunately, Tesla's not going to do anything for you until it meets warranty criteria degradation. I'd suggest switching the display to show you your percentage charge instead of miles and just enjoy driving the car. Obsessing over the range is going to drive you crazy...I know from personal experience. There's nothing you can do about it and 338 miles is way more than enough range and its going to drop anyway.
  • The battery meter range is just an estimate that will be influenced by external factors such as temperature. It is not an indicator of battery health. If you charge the car to 100%, drive to depletion in a single trip while maintaining the rated efficiency, you should get very close to the rated range regardless of what the estimate says.

    Also, there is a 5% buffer at the bottom end that is not accounted for in the range estimate.

    https://www.tesla.com/support/range
  • I traded in a 2020 M3 Performance and that was rated at 310 miles and it used to show 308 miles extrapolated to 100% charge from delivery. No 5% buffer etc.

    I don't have a problem with 338 miles range but want to make sure that I have been delivered exactly what I purchased i.e a vehicle with EPA rating of 353 miles.

    There is discussion on other forums about two variants of batteries being delivered a 77.8 kWH (usable) Panasonic Battery and a 74.5 kWh (usable) LG Battery.  Based on my calculations the higher capacity battery would indeed show 353 miles instead of 338.

    I'd like to know if anyone is seeing 353 miles.
  • We have 2020 3 LR that supposed to be 322 miles it never showed that and max was 310. I am sure if I try to drive from 100 to zero I can probably drive 322 miles. I am not worrying bc in car guess o meter is estimated driving distance and not a sticker range. In mean while read my thread about maximizing driving range which is copy/paste from manual in case you didn't read it there.
  • > @kaldip_98461471 said:
    > Took delivery of 2021 M3 LR in UK on Dec 21st. I am seeing a 100% charge range of 338 miles. Is anyone seeing 353 miles?

    Change to percent and be happy, you have a great car. Range is an estimate, period. There are too many factors that are involved. With my ICE vehicles, I always got better mileage (close to or at EPA estimates) driving around my home (Florida and flat) compared to when I visited the areas of the country which had lots of hills. The same laws of physics will apply to EV's. Going up, more energy, doing down less energy, flat terrain, much more consistent energy usage. Looking at the energy graph, estimated range changes from the 5, 15 or 30 miles selection. I've found that with my limited experience with the Model 3 (new owner) it is pretty good at estimating my range.
  • > @SteveWin1 said: > I'd suggest switching the display to show you your percentage charge instead of miles and just enjoy driving the car."

    That can leave you stranded in cold weather as percentage gives least info and is most inaccurate in cold weather. Off by 64 miles, 20% of range in example below. Best to look at Projected Range in Energy/Consumption which, will show actual range based on last 30 miles of driving conditions.

    Stats app allows you look at the actual range estimated range easily without having to call up Energy/Consumption graph which takes up whole screen.

    https://imgur.com/ymkHFJZ

    To the original question, likely cold weather which reduces capacity of battery. In warmer weather the 100% charge will likely go over Rated depending on battery degradation by summer time.
  • If you use navigation it won't leave you stranded.
  • > @WW_Icefree said: > If you use navigation it won't leave you stranded."

    It will as many drivers note, they'll get warnings to slow down or even pull over as Rated Range suddenly crashes in the last 50 miles. Nav uses Rated Range so will be off in winter by up to 30%.
  • Totally false claim. Please get this troll of the forum now.
  • > @WW_Icefree said:> Totally false claim.

    Do we believe resident Tesla fanbois troll or our lying eyes?

    https://imgur.com/ymkHFJZ

    Everyone can see this by comparing Rated Range to Projected Range on the Energy/Consumption graph.
  • Lol again false claims by Troll and 3rd party app that Tesla doesn't recognize and recommend against use of such. Ban Fish now!
  • Nav doesn't use rated range. It uses recent history and route project (including elevation to some degree).
  • > @hokiegir1 said: > Nav doesn't use rated range. It uses recent history and route project (including elevation to some degree).

    If you look at the range posted in Nav as you drive it is rated not the Projected.

    Only time car seems to look at Projected Range is last 50 miles when it has to reconcile the two different numbers and why drivers get the "SLOW DOWN" warning later in a Nav drive vs. when you first plug in the destination.
  • Once again false claim by troll. Ban him now.
  • The 353 mile number is the EPA rating. EPA numbers are used for cars in the US. Aren't cars sold in the UK advertised with the WLTP number rather than the EPA number? Both numbers are bogus but more importantly they represent not only different test cycles but are also based on separate tests. In the US all cars come from the Fremont factory and use the new Panasonic batteries which have a 5% energy capacity bump. In the EU the cars come from either the US or China. The MIC LR cars are using LG batteries rather than the Panasonic batteries. The LG batteries don't hold as much as the Panasonic batteries, there was a news story a couple of days ago that they were software limiting the European Panasonic cars so that they would match the LG cars. Don't know if this is true but it's certainly plausible. If they are doing that then your car might have a slightly lower range than a US car.

    That said, you should set the range indicator to percent. It's a really bad indicator and no one knows what constant they are using to generate it. The Energy Display has a vastly better range number, it takes into account your actual driving. Speed, driving style and weather have a tremendous effect on range. This is especially true for weather, you have the heat pump so that should be better than the old heater that was in the pre 2021 cars, never the less heat is expensive. Rain and snow also have a big effect on highway range. The EPA and WLTP numbers assume dry air, the drag from rainy air is much higher than for dry air. The energy display is based on the last few miles (up to 30) that you've driven so it's taking into account current conditions wich is why it's a reasonable number to use.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    >
    > Only time car seems to look at Projected Range is last 50 miles when it has to reconcile the two different numbers and why drivers get the "SLOW DOWN" warning later in a Nav drive vs. when you first plug in the destination.
    >
    >

    We have gotten the "Slow down" 15-30 miles into a 150-200 mile trip when having swapped drivers at the last charging stop. Hubby drives less efficiently than I do. The charging stop accounted for my driving (the prior 150-200 miles), but when he takes over, we can no longer make the next stop without adjustment. If I continue on as driver, or we go the other way (he drives first, I take over at the stop), we don't have the same issue. Also, if you look at the actual Trip Estimate, you can see the "real time" changes either up or down -- and that's with neither of us being likely to hit Rated Efficiency (2 lead feet -- with one worse than the other).
  • @hokiegir1 +1 same here about warning. I wonder if he doesn't even know what car does or doesn't or just playing dumb as usual. Ban Fish now!
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > Everyone can see this by comparing Rated Range to Projected Range on the Energy/Consumption graph.

    Or we could scroll down in the screen shot you posted and look at the driving efficiency at only 76%. The driver of this car is heavy footed. Or did they do that on purpose just to make the range look crappy and you forgot to crop out that evidence?
  • > @hokiegir1 said: > We have gotten the "Slow down" 15-30 miles into a 150-200 mile trip when having swapped drivers at the last charging stop."

    That's typical. It doesn't look at Projected Range until the end when it has to reconcile rated with actual range. If Nav used actual range from the beginning, it would give the warning when you did the original nav input which would be much more useful.
  • Sigh, not another range thread. The 353 mile range is a value determined by government tests. The range you see on screen is an estimated range based on many factors.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    >
    > That's typical. It doesn't look at Projected Range until the end when it has to reconcile rated with actual range. If Nav used actual range from the beginning, it would give the warning when you did the original nav input which would be much more useful.
    >
    >

    You literally have no idea what you are saying now. The trip *is* going from when it's entered into nav. The difference is that the driver efficiency is different -- so the charging stop accounted for the prior driver in the full projection, but when we changed drivers, it immediately started to account for the change. If we keep the same driver or have the reverse swap, the full projection is correct or is improved on.

    The same is true on the first leg of the trip if I've been the driver locally for a few days and he takes the first leg or if it's colder than it has been so our heater use is having a greater impact -- it'll tell him to slow down fairly early into the trip as those initial uses are computed. It doesn't "suddenly pop up 50 miles from the destination" unless we start making big changes that far in -- like turning on the heater when it's been off or going from 75/80 average to 85/90 average. We'll sometimes go for efficient driving early if we are concerned and as we get farther in, we'll be a little more lenient with "high use" items.
  • > @hokiegir1 said: The trip *is* going from when it's entered into nav."

    And the range is based on Rated Range not the Projected Range of Energy/Consumption. Easy to see by looking at the numbers the nav is showing.

    That's why the "slow down" message appears at the end of the trip and not at the beginning when it would be more useful.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    >
    > That's why the "slow down" message appears at the end of the trip and not at the beginning when it would be more useful.

    What part of "It appears at the beginning of the trip" was unclear in my prior posts?
  • First: FISHEV is present. Public Service Announcement:
    FISHEV is a known troll of several years standing and several user
    names who pushes an anti Tesla narrative. Please
    take his opinions with a grain of salt, avoid any advice he may
    suggest, and do not let him implant any Fear, Uncertainty, or Doubt
    about Tesla or your car into your own opinion.
    FISH likely doesn't own a Tesla and, further, is likely an employee, or number of employees, at a shill farm.

    Second: The SO and I own a 2018 M3 LR RWD, acquired in September of that year. At times its range estimate, either direct with 100% charge or extrapolated from the range at 90% charge, has been as high as 324 miles, especially after the "range boost" update that occurred in 12/2018; other times, that range has roughly held steady around 310 miles; and the range estimate has sometimes varied in a fairly steady manner depending upon how the car was being used. In particular, in late 1st quarter of 2019, the SO and I took a several thousand mile trip from NJ to Georgia and back. Before we took the trip, the range estimate had been hovering around 309 miles. During the trip, over several charging stops where we were going from a couple-10 percent charge when we'd get to a Supercharger and leaving with 80%-90%, we'd be back to that 320-odd mile range estimate; and that stuck around even after getting back home. Then, slowly, over the next few months with no dead-empty/full-charge events happening, the range estimate once again dropped off to 308-312 miles. Which is where it's at now, plus or minus a few excursions over time, with 25,000-odd miles on the car.
    Given that the range estimator is just that, a 315+-5 mile estimate, then there is an implication that the range estimator is vaguely accurate to +-5/315 = +-1.5%. Ha.
    +-1.5%? Sheesh, that's seriously accurate. There are similar range estimators in ICE cars and they're _way_ more inaccurate than that!
    So, FISH and his/her/its blathering can take a hike. Thing is, people look at that range estimate and somehow figure that it's not a guess-o-meter, when it is. As others have pointed out, the best way to "reset" the guess-o-meter is to take the car down to 1-5% charge, then charge it to 100%, then repeat or something, and, if you're lucky, it'll give you that higher estimate you crave. I figure if you're within 5% you're doing pretty well.
    And doing that full charge business on a regular basis may float your boat, but it doesn't do the battery any good. Musk & Co. say regular charges to up to 90% don't do any serious harm, and the occasional 100% just before a long trip is just fine, but there are people around here that think that 80% charge is safer for the longevity of the battery. Me, I tend to stick with 90%, but others may disagree.
    In the meantime, to the OP: You've got the 2021 model. Tesla has been improving the efficiency of the motor. It's not exactly a surprise that you've got a longer range estimate as a result, potentially bigger battery or no potentially bigger battery. And it's an estimate, and, again, it's not like using a laboratory balance beam accurate to 0.001%, you'll be in good stead if it's +-5%. So, what's your problem, again?
  • > @bjrosen said: > That said, you should set the range indicator to percent. It's a really bad indicator and no one knows what constant they are using to generate it.”

    You do. The constant is the cars EPA range divided by the battery kW for miles/kWh.

    4.13 miles per kWh in my 310 Rated Range 75kWh 2019 LR AWD.

    You can see the same constant from other side in “Rated” range line with range in kWh per mile, 241 wH per mile.
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