Model 3

Bought used as AWD, turned out to be RWD

A couple of weeks ago, I bought a 2018 Model 3 from Carvana which was advertised as AWD. I know this makes me sound dumb, but only after reading on this forum about how to interpret a VIN did I realize it is actually RWD. I put in a complaint to Carvana and am waiting to hear back about any accommodation they can offer.

I like the car a lot, and it is otherwise just what I wanted, including EAP. Running Kelly Blue Book estimates, it appears there is nearly a $4,000 difference between the resale values of AWD and RWD, but Carvana claimed their price was about $2,000 below KBB.

So, what do you think would be a fair resolution?
«1

Comments

  • > @bjrosen said:
    > They should take the car back and sell you another one.

    They don't seem to have anything comparable, unless they would be willing to sell me a newer, lower-mileage car (and likely without EAP) for the same price.
  • Don't they have a great return policy?
  • I think it's 7 days...
  • Ask for $10K off the price. RWD is still an awesome car. It is better in snow and ice than any ICE FWD or RWD and about as good as many AWD ICE.
  • It took you couple of weeks to understand you got RWD vs AWD? Didn't you check your car config on the screen when they delivered it to you?
  • Had the same thing happen to a friend on what he thought was a 4X4 Tacoma pickup. He is also pretty vehicle savvy and a lawyer. I said to him did you look at the back side of the front wheels to see if there were drive lines attached?
  • What does the screen IN THE CAR say it is?
  • > @operator64 said:
    > What does the screen IN THE CAR say it is?

    This. I would have always checked the car screen first. In my experience browsing new cars, no company understands how to market or list Tesla vehicles and include all the features. Car screen tells you everything.
  • > @andy_connor_e said:
    > > @operator64 said:
    > > What does the screen IN THE CAR say it is?
    >
    > This. I would have always checked the car screen first. In my experience browsing new cars, no company understands how to market or list Tesla vehicles and include all the features. Car screen tells you everything.

    The car screen wasn't so obvious to this newbie. It says "Model 3 Long Range," but does not say anything about RWD. Going one level further down on the software menu II'm using 48.30), it tells me that the rear drive is AC and does not mention another drive. However, I never looked that far until I checked the VIN.
  • No worries about being a newbie, but if you were falsely misled about the car details then Carvana should make it right just like how any other company would.
  • Judge is going to ask for signed paperwork. Likely Carvana's paperwork says it is a RWD somewhere even if it is just listing of car features.

    Even if you can print out original listing saying AWD, it will say "subject to change" on specs so it will depend on what paperwork you actually signed.

    If signed paperwork says AWD, you have all the legal leverage and can make them take car back, pay for legal and other costs or offer you cash back to compensate.

    If signed paperwork says RWD, enjoy your RWD Tesla.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > Judge is going to ask for signed paperwork. Likely Carvana's paperwork says it is a RWD somewhere even if it is just listing of car features.
    >
    > Even if you can print out original listing saying AWD, it will say "subject to change" on specs so it will depend on what paperwork you actually signed.
    >
    > If signed paperwork says AWD, you have all the legal leverage and can make them take car back, pay for legal and other costs or offer you cash back to compensate.
    >
    > If signed paperwork says RWD, enjoy your RWD Tesla

    The contract does not mention AWD or RWD. It identifies the car as Model 3 Long Range and gives the VIN and mileage. That's all.

    Frankly, I did not even realize until very recently that the original Long Range models had RWD. I'll bet whoever posted the specs for Carvana thought the same.
  • > @CameraJim said:
    > The contract does not mention AWD or RWD. It identifies the car as Model 3 Long Range and gives the VIN and mileage. That's all.
    >
    > Frankly, I did not even realize until very recently that the original Long Range models had RWD. I'll bet whoever posted the specs for Carvana thought the same.

    If thats actually the case then i dont think you have any ground to stand on. However, Carvana really should have stated this.
  • > @CameraJim said: > The contract does not mention AWD or RWD. It identifies the car as Model 3 Long Range and gives the VIN and mileage. That's all."

    That's a tough one as likely the legal boilerplate on the contracts covers them BUT if you have a screenshot of their offer that includes their saying AWD and listing the VIN, judge might go with you if you Carvana does not offer to take car back or pay for lack of AWD.

    IF you have a screenshot, take it and all signed contracts to a lawyer who specializes in auto law (lemon lawyer for example) as they can tell you if you have a case or not for $100.
  • > @FISHEV said:
    > > @CameraJim said: > The contract does not mention AWD or RWD. It identifies the car as Model 3 Long Range and gives the VIN and mileage. That's all."
    >
    > That's a tough one as likely the legal boilerplate on the contracts covers them BUT if you have a screenshot of their offer that includes their saying AWD and listing the VIN, judge might go with you if you Carvana does not offer to take car back or pay for lack of AWD.
    >
    > IF you have a screenshot, take it and all signed contracts to a lawyer who specializes in auto law (lemon lawyer for example) as they can tell you if you have a case or not for $100.
    >
    >
    I have a PDF copy of the original online listing, identifying it as AWD.

    So far, they have offered to give me my money back on return of the car, but that leaves me without any car, having traded my Acura. I don't consider this an adequate offer, at all.
  • > @CameraJim said: > So far, they have offered to give me my money back on return of the car, but that leaves me without any car, having traded my Acura. I don't consider this an adequate offer, at all."

    So Carvana is being honest about it and returning the car is legit option.

    Check with KBB.com and see if you overpaid for the RWD. If you paid fair price for RWD and you like the car, keep it.
  • Every now and then, FishEV posts honest, correct advice. This is one of those posts.

    If you really like the car, make a counter-offer to Carvana for the $4000 difference that KBB shows. What you actually paid isn't really germane, IMHO; what's important is how much extra you paid due to the incorrect information.

    I've got a LR RWD, and love it. I'd love an AWD even more, for no other reason than the increased acceleration would put a wider grin on my face. I don't live in snow country, so could care less about the traction differences, and other than traction and acceleration, there's little difference between them.
  • Sheesh. FISHEV is present. Public Service Announcement:
    FISHEV is a known troll of several years standing and several user
    names who pushes an anti Tesla narrative. Please
    take his opinions with a grain of salt, avoid any advice he may
    suggest, and do not let him implant any Fear, Uncertainty, or Doubt
    about Tesla or your car into your own opinion.
    In particular, it's unlikely that FISHY actually owns a Tesla. There's some suspicion that the entity is actually a shill farm, here to disrupt the forums. As part of that, FISHY often tries to fake out newbies who aren't aware of his/her/its reputation and floods the forums with posts so its $SS shows up in Google searches first. Taking advice from it is counterindicated.
    I happen to drive a 2018 M3 LR RWD and like it, but on the other hand I paid the money for it knowing what it actually was. In this case, it's a case of mistaken false advertising. Carvana's not a small company, talk to them, complain, and the two of you should come to an accommodation that satisfies both parties. If you can't, then, that's why there's courts or the equivalent to preserve equity. Not to mention the various State regulatory bodies who take a dim view of selling one thing when one knows, or should have known, that it was another. In this case, it's very definitely a "should have known" case since decoding VIN numbers is not exactly an unknown to a car dealership, used or otherwise.
  • So this is one of those 0.001 % when Fish is actually right.
  • > @Tronguy said:
    > In this case, it's very definitely a "should have known" case since decoding VIN numbers is not exactly an unknown to a car dealership, used or otherwise.

    That's how I've come to see it, after the conversation above. I figure I overpaid. I'd like to keep the car. It would be a pain to switch and it's not likely I'll easily find another that ticks so many boxes -- long range, right color, EAP, upgraded wheels.

    So ,I have asked for a refund to cover the difference. I'm waiting for a call back by the next level of management. I'll post here when it's resolved one way or another.
  • > @WW_Icefree said:
    > So this is one of those 0.001 % when Fish is actually right.

    Surely he's not right THAT much?!
  • I am always impressed when I watch the local 6pm news and the Consumer Troubleshooter reporter tries to resolve a consumer complaint.

    I’ll bet if you contact your local TV News outlet and explain your predicament, you will get a better outcome than if you follow the advice of FishEV.
Sign In or Register to comment.