General

CCS adapter, the fake Chinese one pushed by Fish, destroyed a Tesla

edited January 19 in General
https://mobile.twitter.com/greentheonly/status/1351306994175668226


“Car had to be towed to Tesla (cannot charge at all) where a number of replacements was performed. Charger, harness and some hose?

Not sure why external connection to the chargeport can fry the car, did anybody even test that scenario at Tesla I wonder?”
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Comments

  • Why I am not surprised?
  • Need to go back to FISHY's original thread and put the fact that it destroyed an M3 in the process.
  • And this is why there is a standard with “shall not”s in it.
  • Can we get Fish the scam pusher to respond here? Or even better get him banned for pushing scam fake products that destroy Teslas.
  • His post will start with,

    Well more like....
  • Next there will be a software update to detect and reject charge from these devices as a protection measure.
  • > @Spuzzz said:
    > Next there will be a software update to detect and reject charge from these devices as a protection measure.

    Wasting coding time that could be better spent.
  • The protection measure is in the warranty and the spec.
  • > @jallred said:
    > The protection measure is in the warranty and the spec.

    Sure. Assuming Tesla honors the warranty for replacing chargers that break when using third party products, that’d be fine for consumers. I’m not sure Tesla wants to bear that liability, though.
  • In fact they should stipulate that they will not honor the warranty when connecting 3rd party equipment, adapters etc.
  • I wonder if he didn't tell Tesla true story how this happened.
  • Sure. Assuming Tesla honors the warranty for replacing chargers that break when using third party products, that’d be fine for consumers. I’m not sure Tesla wants to bear that liability, though.-spuzzz

    Guess I didn’t explain well enough. The warranty says it doesn’t cover third party. The spec calls out no adapters. The two combined should convince a consumer to stay away and protect Tesla from liability.
  • The adapter is a hack. It acts to convince the car that it is attached to a legit charger and acts to convince the charger it is attached to a legit car. The communication between car and charger is there to ensure safe charging. Bypassing this with proxies is dangerous.
  • > @WW_Icefree said:
    > I wonder if he didn't tell Tesla true story how this happened.

    I certainly hope they were truthful in the events leading up to the failure, however it may be detrimental to do so, leaving one to speculate.
  • > @"TeslaTap.com" said:
    > FISH promoted it could provide 1000V to the car. As I replied to that thread, it's a great way to destroy the car. Looks like I was mostly right. I wonder if the damaged car was his own car? That would be justice. I sure he'd lie to Tesla service and try to get it repaired under warranty.
    >
    Oh man, that really would be justice but highly unlikely for 2 reasons. First, I don't think he actually owns a Tesla and second, if he 'does' own one, he wouldn't do anything risky to it. He just wants to see others have their cars damaged for his kicks/cash
  • > @jallred said:
    > The adapter is a hack. It acts to convince the car that it is attached to a legit charger and acts to convince the charger it is attached to a legit car. The communication between car and charger is there to ensure safe charging. Bypassing this with proxies is dangerous.

    I read the CCS adapter tells the car its a Tesla CHAdeMO adapter so the Tesla thinks its using a supported adapter.
  • No FISH to be found. Shocking.
  • And if he does show up, it'll be to blame the user.
  • Remember that a DC Fast charger offers a direct connection to your $10K+ battery. Unlike with an AC "level 2" J-1772 charging station, the battery relies on the charger to control the voltage applied to the battery. It counts on good, crisp communications between sensors in the car and the charger to ensure that the voltage is dropped when the battery requires it in order to avoid damage.
    Do you really want some nameless 3rd party hack product to be able to control this process on your expensive battery?
  • Spend $600 plus on an item to F-up your $50k plus car
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