Model 3

Charging and Covid

This may seem ridiculous to link these two, but with the semi-quarantine in effect I (and many others) are hardly going anywhere. Therefore, my M3 sits in the garage for days on end. I charged it up to 80% after my last trip and have watched it slowly lose a point or two each night. Does the advice to keep it plugged in every night still make sense in these circumstances? I’ve been waiting till it drops to around 65% before charging it back to 80. Thoughts welcome.

Comments

  • Leave the car plugged in whenever possible. Just like it says in the owners manual.
  • I am in the same situation as the OP and I only drive my SR+ for local errands.

    I generally charge to 80% then keep the car unplugged. Whether from local driving or losses from being parked in the garage, I only charge up once the car is depleted to 50%, and bring it up to 80% again.

    I realize that Tesla recommends keeping the car plugged in while parked all the time. But I’m concerned about voltage surges from the grid that could potentially damage the car. I think it’s safer to isolate the car by unplugging it, and simply monitor the battery state of charge. Then plug in the car only for the time necessary to recharge to the desired 80% level.
  • I have dropped my charging to 70% but I do keep it plugged in most of the time.
  • I charge it to 80%, then adjust limit to 50%, and leave it always plugged in.
    After a few drives and normal droppage, when it gets to 50%, I set it back at 80 and repeat process.
  • If you keep it plugged in and at 80%, you'll be ready to go at a moment's notice.
  • I go for drives everyday. Refreshes the mind and spirit.
  • I keep mine plugged in and the limit set to 75%.
  • I did 15.5k miles in the first 7 months of ownership and 1.3k miles the last 10 months, of which 800 miles was on three trips.

    The car stays plugged in. It’s outside - won’t really fit in a UK standard garage and, anyway, us Brits use garages for our freezers and other storage rather than cars! I’ve switch scheduled charge off and have it on 60% most of the time.

    Limited legal reasons here to leave the house so, every few weeks, I take an opportunity to warm and rotate the tyres on a short drive. I also exercise the brakes. I avoid driving when the roads have been salted as the car sits in rain and damp for long periods in-between.

    Glad to have the Tesla though. The ICE has been higher maintenance through the lockdowns with the need to use it more to lube and charge and it also has to go to petrol stations with all of their downsides.

    Side note: I like the recent improvements to predicted range. It seems to nicely track battery temperature. You can see the increase when you pre-warm. The clarity in the app of battery warning running is also good.
  • I thought perhaps this was going to be about supercharging and dealing with the potential threat of getting infected by someone there?

    I find that the Tesla guess-o-meter changes its mind like my GF's decision on what to wear.
  • > @JEI said: > I find that the Tesla guess-o-meter changes its mind like my GF's decision on what to wear."

    You can look at the actual-o-meter, Energy/Consumption 30 mile/avg on the car screen for your Projected (actual) Range.

    To answer the question a lot of us thought was being asked, I wipe my hands with a disinfecting wipe after handling the charger cord.
  • More nonsense, projected = actual in Fish's flat earth world.
  • Public Service Announcement:
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    names who pushes an anti Tesla narrative. Please
    take his opinions with a grain of salt, avoid any advice he may
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    about Tesla or your car into your own opinion.
    It's strongly suspected that FISH is an employee or a bunch of employees of a shill farm, paid to disrupt the forums, confuse newbies, push the stock price down, and confuse so-called stock analysts. Don't listen to him/her/it.
  • I bought my M3 to conserve energy, among other reasons. I live in cold, rural New England. Now that it's really cold, I lose at least 8 miles of range for everyday it sits in my driveway unplugged. I bought the car in September and have only put 2,333 miles on it. It seems foolish to plug it in every night unless I know I'm going to drive it over 50 miles the next day. Why pay for energy that is just going to be sapped by cold weather instead of being used to actually power the car?
  • > @Shelburne said:
    > I bought my M3 to conserve energy, among other reasons. I live in cold, rural New England. Now that it's really cold, I lose at least 8 miles of range for everyday it sits in my driveway unplugged. I bought the car in September and have only put 2,333 miles on it. It seems foolish to plug it in every night unless I know I'm going to drive it over 50 miles the next day. Why pay for energy that is just going to be sapped by cold weather instead of being used to actually power the car?
    >

    Not foolish as keeping the car plugged in as it is best for maintaining the battery health. Also, you would lose the energy while the car is parked weather the car is plugged in or not.
  • > @M3phan said:
    > I go for drives everyday. Refreshes the mind and spirit.

    Agreed, excellent idea
  • "Why pay for energy that is just going to be sapped by cold weather instead of being used to actually power the car?"
    Whether or not it's plugged in, during cold weather, some battery power will be used to keep the battery within normal temp range. It's not wasting electricity, it's a function of the car. Tesla owner's manual says to keep it plugged in when possible and since they designed it, maybe they have some knowledge about the subject.
  • @Shelburne: So, it loses a bit of energy due to energy management while sitting in the driveway. Fine, I understand your motivation to complain about Joules of energy disappearing into the ether.
    On the other hand, the car gets, what, 130 MPGe. It would take a whole lotta energy loss to get to the point of having a worse cost of fueling than an ICE-based car. Even with somewhat reduced mileage in the dead of winter. (Remember, cold weather affects ICEs with worse mileage and longer warm-up times in winter; maybe not as bad as a Tesla is affected, but the effect is noticeable. And the newer Teslas that have heat pumps are probably more on a par with cold weather energy use degradation.)
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