Model S

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Can we take our TESLA INTO ANY BODY SHOP

I was rear ended by another vehicle. The damage isn’t major but I hear that it must go to a Tesla approved body shop is that true?

Comments

  • No, you do not have to go to a Tesla approved body shop. There are many very good body shops that can fix aluminum body cars.
  • But will Tesla provide parts?

    Perhaps it's changed, but until a few years ago, that anwer was no. And many body shops won't work on Teslas because of their negative experiences dealing with the company.
  • Yes you can and Tesla will furnish parts. Make sure they have done Teslas before otherwise you and your shop will have to learn how to order them. They will have to be paid for when delivered. Once we figured out how to do so, they were there in a week. In fact most were in stock at the local Tesla shop.
    I had mind repaired, major damage, at the Chevrolet place that did my Corvette. They did a great job
  • You should look for a body shop with Tesla experience because they’ll need to make sure the sensors are working correctly, otherwise you might need to bring the car to Tesla afterwards for calibration. That’s one of the reasons Tesla recommends specific body shops.
  • > @EVRider said:
    > You should look for a body shop with Tesla experience because they’ll need to make sure the sensors are working correctly, otherwise you might need to bring the car to Tesla afterwards for calibration. That’s one of the reasons Tesla recommends specific body shops.


    I did not have that problem and it was a front in collision
  • The key is the aluminum body. MOST shops can not work on aluminum as it does not behave well around other materials in a body shop. Only high end shops that work with aluminum cars like Porsches, Jaguars and other high end vehicles can do the work. From my limited research, most of these shops have been certified to work on Teslas, but it may be different in your location.
  • Aluminum is a must but a Tesla shop has more parts acquisition capabilities. Locally most aluminum shops are Tesla shops.
  • > @awolusa said:
    > > @EVRider said:
    > > You should look for a body shop with Tesla experience because they’ll need to make sure the sensors are working correctly, otherwise you might need to bring the car to Tesla afterwards for calibration. That’s one of the reasons Tesla recommends specific body shops.
    >
    >
    > I did not have that problem and it was a front in collision
    >

    Because your body shop recalibrated everything? If they didn't know how to do that, how do you know things are calibrated correctly?
  • @EVRider, Can you tell you what are you aware of that has to be recalibrated after having a accident? Please try and be specific because I've never heard of anything like that in my 30 plus years in the automotive business doing work with body shops. The only recent thing I can think of might have something to do with the radar.
  • @tldickerson,
    acoustic transducers are the main thing.
  • > @tldickerson said:
    > @EVRider, Can you tell you what are you aware of that has to be recalibrated after having a accident? Please try and be specific because I've never heard of anything like that in my 30 plus years in the automotive business doing work with body shops. The only recent thing I can think of might have something to do with the radar.

    I'm referring to the ultrasonic sensors. We had rear-end damage to our Model 3, and the body shop that repaired it (recommended by Tesla) had to calibrate the rear sensors in some way. You want to know that all components of the AP hardware suite are working correctly, and not every body shop is capable of verifying that.
  • I'd be very careful. Yes a Tesla authorized body shop is a good idea, and I would say required, but not all body shops are created equal. My S has been stuck in awful body shop limbo for four months now and I wouldn't recommend the particular body shop I used (the closest to my home), but thankfully the car has finally been released to Tesla service for calibration. Guess what? Tesla discovered a discrepancy which the body shop supposedly agreed to pay an additional $600 for. And guess who eventually covers that? Me through my insurance. So.....
  • Most good body shops can handle aluminum repairs and electronic sensor calibration without issue. Every Ford truck is now aluminum and every car manufacturer has sensors akin to those on our cars. Pretty pedestrian stuff these days.
  • @Pungoteague_Dave
    +1
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